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Old 12-11-2017, 08:47 PM   #21
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I agree with posters above - don't give notice unless you are prepared to be walked out the door the same day. It doesn't always happen, and if it doesn't, so much the better, but at least you will have all your ducks in a row if it does.

I also recommend checking your employee handbook or other written policies to see if there is a minimum amount of notice required in order to be eligible to be paid for unused leave, etc. At my company two weeks notice is required in order to be paid for unused vacation. So that is exactly what they will get from me when the time comes, and not a minute more.
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Old 12-11-2017, 08:51 PM   #22
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Old 12-11-2017, 10:15 PM   #23
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Give verbal notice as far in advance as you can. Every one knew 24+ months out for me. I gave written notice two week before the last date.
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Old 12-11-2017, 10:38 PM   #24
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I was C-level and gave two months notice. Turned out to be the longest 60 days of my life.
Can you elaborate?
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Old 12-12-2017, 06:58 AM   #25
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These threads seem like a Rorschach test of organizational culture. Everybody sees something different depending on the company they work for and their own nature. I would have felt like I was slapping my peers in the face if I walked out with two weeks notice but I also knew that there was no way I would be fired or marginalized after giving notice. Had I worked in a poisonous environment where I saw people treated brutally after giving notice I would have walked out at COB with no notice.
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Old 12-12-2017, 09:04 AM   #26
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Give verbal notice as far in advance as you can. Every one knew 24+ months out for me. I gave written notice two week before the last date.
This was us as well, although DW's was both oral and written notice via email. (I never gave written notice.) But it all depends upon your workplace environment and what you do. 2 years notice is unlikely to be appropriate or smart for most workers--and it sure seems that even 2 months can be dicey if one isn't ready to walk at time of notice.
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Old 12-12-2017, 09:12 AM   #27
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My employer has a written policy. 1 month for management and 2 weeks for hourly staff. If you do not provide proper notice, you may not be paid vacation accrued.
So I would read your Policy and ensure you give proper notice that could impact any pay outs.
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Old 12-12-2017, 10:14 AM   #28
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I was C level and my employment contract required 30 days notice. I originally thought I'd give 90-120 days, but as my resignation date approached, I realized I really didn't want to stick around that long. Instead, I prepared my direct reports to handle key responsibilities without sharing my departure plans prematurely. I also prepared a detailed coverage plan outlining my critical activities and deliverables and suggesting how each of them could be handled while my position was vacant, which I gave to my CEO when I resigned.

By the end of the 30 days, I had fully transitioned key responsibilities and felt everything would be fine in my absence. My CEO pressured me to stay longer to allow him to find a replacement, but his approach was not motivating to me so I decided there was nothing he or the company could give me to incent me to stay.

In hindsight, it was best to leave when I did. It took my CEO 11 months to name my replacement and in the meantime my former direct reports had the opportunity to shine and be rewarded. And I had a year of freedom I wouldn't have had if I had put the company's needs before my own.

I agree with others that it depends on the relationship you have with your boss and others at the company. It also depends on what you're retiring to and how important that is as a priority in your life. For me, more time with DH was a much higher priority than more help for my company. And since I complied with the notice period in my contract and worked very hard my last month to ensure a smooth transition, I left on good terms, albeit more quickly than my CEO would have liked.
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Old 12-12-2017, 11:50 AM   #29
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I'm treated like such dog$#@! where I work, I'm just not showing up the day after my last holiday bonus check hits the bank.

... I kid.

I'll probably ask my boss (a nice guy, truly) how long he needs me to stick around, to be in his good graces after I'm gone; you never know what could go wrong with retirement finances, and may need to re-enter the workforce. (Unlike you lot, I don't have a seven-figure portfolio, or even close.)
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Old 12-12-2017, 12:25 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Aerides View Post
My answer is "Give notice no sooner than you are ready to be asked to leave that day."
I agree with this. I was on good terms with my company, too. But I made all preparations just in case I got a "Thanks for your service, and security is going to rough you up on the way out."

My letter said two weeks, I told my boss I could stay longer if needed, and in the end, I transitioned everything in about 3 days and got paid for the rest.
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Old 12-12-2017, 05:17 PM   #31
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No person is irreplaceable, if it takes more than 30 days for company to transition your responsibilities / duties then you and the company haven't done a very good job of cross training.

Providing a long notice of your retirement seems to be either be that you are really not mentally prepared for retirement or that you are looking to garner attention from your peers and staff.
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Old 12-12-2017, 05:22 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Scuba View Post
I was C level and my employment contract required 30 days notice. I originally thought I'd give 90-120 days, but as my resignation date approached, I realized I really didn't want to stick around that long. Instead, I prepared my direct reports to handle key responsibilities without sharing my departure plans prematurely. I also prepared a detailed coverage plan outlining my critical activities and deliverables and suggesting how each of them could be handled while my position was vacant, which I gave to my CEO when I resigned.

By the end of the 30 days, I had fully transitioned key responsibilities and felt everything would be fine in my absence. My CEO pressured me to stay longer to allow him to find a replacement, but his approach was not motivating to me so I decided there was nothing he or the company could give me to incent me to stay.

In hindsight, it was best to leave when I did. It took my CEO 11 months to name my replacement and in the meantime my former direct reports had the opportunity to shine and be rewarded. And I had a year of freedom I wouldn't have had if I had put the company's needs before my own.
Interesting, your experience was very similar to what I had outlined as my approach to announcing my retirement. As of next month it will be two years since I gave my notice, hard to believe how quickly two years has passed.
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Old 12-12-2017, 05:39 PM   #33
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I gave six months.

It was great. It changed my relationship with the Company. I didn't spend time on the next cycle's planning. I didn't do my "employee development" stuff for HR.

My boss knew that he wanted me around to finish a big project, he made that clear to his boss. I worked on something I enjoyed and shucked as much of the irritating stuff as I could.
What he said...contract required six months notice but my boss knew I was out the door. It was kind of nice not having to deal with a HR cycle and a budget cycle and still get paid.
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Old 12-12-2017, 06:42 PM   #34
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I ended up giving two months notice, right after the bonus for the year hit my paycheck. I was working from home by that point, so I didn't have any personal effects at my desk to be removed, and there were no other financial incentives I needed to be concerned about.

The two month date coincided with a major project deliverable date, so I knew I was pretty safe - I would have been ecstatic to get cut off and not have to finish it, but I also knew that no one else wanted to do it since it was a tedious and annoying project. In the end, I finished it a couple of weeks early and coasted into the final date.
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Old 12-12-2017, 07:22 PM   #35
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I worked in megacorp for nearly 20 years. I gave them nearly 6 months notice. This time period included 2 qtrly director bonuses and an option vest. Yes it was a gamble in an at-will state, but I had great relationships with everyone there and I felt the risk was very small. In the end, it was a great decision for me and they really appreciated it.
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Old 12-12-2017, 09:12 PM   #36
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No person is irreplaceable, if it takes more than 30 days for company to transition your responsibilities / duties then you and the company haven't done a very good job of cross training.

Providing a long notice of your retirement seems to be either be that you are really not mentally prepared for retirement or that you are looking to garner attention from your peers and staff.
Depends upon the job. Say you are partner in a four doctor group with every fourth night/weekend call for OB in a nonteaching hospital. Getting someone competent and capable to replace you comfortably within that partnership can take 2+ years even when actively searching. (And, pray tell, who can be "cross trained" to take your responsibilities within the group--when only your three partners have licenses and privileges?)

The group could go to every third and swing the other day--but that isn't simply replacing you. (If you got hit by a truck, they'd make do, but at considerable expense to their personal lives until they managed to find a replacement.)
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Old 12-13-2017, 12:10 AM   #37
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Can you elaborate?
I had previously positioned or promoted key staff into roles where they could easily assume portions of my responsibilities. When I was confident they could swim on their own, I gave my notice. They enthusiastically stepped up to the plate and took everything off mine. By day 30, I literally had nothing to do. By day 59, I felt like Kramer in those Seinfeld episodes showing up for work every day for a job that didn't exist. Not to mention that knowing what awaited me at the end of those two months made every day seem to last 48 hours.
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Old 12-13-2017, 06:48 AM   #38
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My retirement was all set to happen on Oct 31. We went on an Alaskan cruise in late August and during the cruise I threw my back out. Came back to work in early Sept in a wheelchair, As soon as my boss saw me he told me to “go home and get better. If we see you back here it’s great but not required”. Only went back to clear out my desk and attend my going away dinner. Too bad I was in so much pain and couldnt enjoy the extra time. As I said, these guys were a class act.
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Old 12-13-2017, 11:55 AM   #39
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I gave 6 months notice.... I based this on a request by the CEO for 6 months notice.
Personally, I would factor in the CEO's request to my decision-making process only if the company had previously been reasonably receptive to my requests (for pay raises, additional staffing or other resources, flexibility in scheduling vacation time, etc.).
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Old 12-13-2017, 12:18 PM   #40
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Depends upon the job. Say you are partner in a four doctor group with every fourth night/weekend call for OB in a nonteaching hospital. Getting someone competent and capable to replace you comfortably within that partnership can take 2+ years even when actively searching. (And, pray tell, who can be "cross trained" to take your responsibilities within the group--when only your three partners have licenses and privileges?)

The group could go to every third and swing the other day--but that isn't simply replacing you. (If you got hit by a truck, they'd make do, but at considerable expense to their personal lives until they managed to find a replacement.)
I'd bet my next month's worth of dividends that what you outline is really unique and doesn't reflect the majority of users here.
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