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Old 12-26-2016, 04:19 PM   #41
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If I can get a 5% yield I would t take any or just what I need to cover expenses. I have 2 goals. One is to make sure my wife has enough to live on as she 11 years younger and two to leave a decent amount to my 2 kids. If I can pull $150k a year out and not touch principal then I think I will have a nice retirement!
Dividends are useful in retirement, but I think you need to do a bit more reading about safe withdrawal rates and schemes.
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Old 12-27-2016, 06:02 AM   #42
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Anyone that could consistently beat the market would not waste their time writing newsletters or giving seminars. Think about it.
Not really true at all. I could be a psychic but I'd still need capital to take advantage of my gift. Writing a newsletter would be easy guaranteed money and would probably be a fun thing to do.
Now I do agree that most of those guys are more hype than substance but I just don't think the "If they were good they wouldn't need to write a newsletter" doesn't hold water.
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Old 12-27-2016, 06:58 AM   #43
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I will offer one bit of advice......5%/year is too much income to be taking from your portfolio.

+ 1. If your withdrawal rate is truly 5%, then you are taking on a degree of risk that exceeds nearly all conservative norms. If you are comfortable taking that gamble then you will find few like minded souls on this forum.



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Old 12-27-2016, 07:36 AM   #44
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i guess I am one of the few like minded souls, i find morningstar discussion forums very helpful, i followed the link to boggleheads and spend a minute there and didn't see the appeal, appears like random discussions one could spend days reading. I tried to do a search for CEF focused investors, didn't find any. Morningstar has focused forums, the CEF forum and the Fidelity forum, recent buy and sells appeals to me.
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Old 12-27-2016, 08:50 AM   #45
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i guess I am one of the few like minded souls, i find morningstar discussion forums very helpful, i followed the link to boggleheads and spend a minute there and didn't see the appeal, appears like random discussions one could spend days reading. I tried to do a search for CEF focused investors, didn't find any. Morningstar has focused forums, the CEF forum and the Fidelity forum, recent buy and sells appeals to me.
Almost by definition you won't find many bogleheads using CEFs in their portfolios.
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Old 12-27-2016, 08:57 AM   #46
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Almost by definition you won't find many bogleheads using CEFs in their portfolios.
+1

You'll have about as much luck searching the bogleheads.org site for CEF threads as searching vegancooking.com for a steak tartare recipe.
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Old 12-27-2016, 12:40 PM   #47
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I carry and trade many different investments. Though the boglehead concept holds some merit I think it is not diversified enough. These days there are more ways to diversify and still limit risk. In fact, I am starting to think in my old age that the market is too risky for me. One of the reasons I am looking at real estate funding and preferred stocks. Both have some sense of security against the original investments and have a lower chance in my view of principal loss.
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Old 12-27-2016, 01:38 PM   #48
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........Though the boglehead concept holds some merit I think it is not diversified enough.... .
I would be hard to be more diversified than half Total World Stock Market and half Total Market Bond fund portfolio that is frequently mentioned there.
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Old 12-27-2016, 01:39 PM   #49
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... Though the boglehead concept holds some merit I think it is not diversified enough. ....
Some things I read are so silly that they don't deserve a response.
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Old 12-27-2016, 02:08 PM   #50
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What I am saying is your not exposed to other forms of investments like real estate.
I think real estate deserves a place. Whether thru reit or crowdfunding and i like the crowdfunding right now.
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Old 12-27-2016, 02:13 PM   #51
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Some things I read are so silly that they don't deserve a response.
+1
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Old 12-27-2016, 02:29 PM   #52
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I have a mix of individual stocks that I manage personally, and some index ETFs and 401k mutual funds for the rest.

My personal investing results have been very similar to an S&P 500 index fund, aside from sidestepping some of the 2000 tech meltdown because for whatever reason, I could see that it was a crazy bubble. I wasn't out of the market, but I had probably 50% cash because I kept selling stuff because the valuations were crazy and I wasn't finding anything I was comfortable buying.

I went into the Great Recession fully invested, though, so I'm not Nostradamus. I didn't sell and bought all the way through, though, so I've got that going for me.

I read Peter Lynch's books way back when, and everything I could get my hands on by and about Warren Buffet. I don't purchase any newsletters. I follow a bunch of companies, and when the market has them priced reasonably, I buy them. I tend to hang onto them for the long term, unless they get extremely overvalued IMO.

There is pretty much nothing I am buying right now, and my cash levels have been creeping up for awhile. I'm now roughly 80% stocks 20% cash, when my preference is to be fully invested.
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Old 12-27-2016, 02:33 PM   #53
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Some things I read are so silly that they don't deserve a response.
+2

No need to respond to comments from under the bridge.
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Old 12-27-2016, 02:41 PM   #54
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What I am saying is your not exposed to other forms of investments like real estate.
I think real estate deserves a place. Whether thru reit or crowdfunding and i like the crowdfunding right now.
Take Total Stock's annual report and do a search for "real estate", "realty" and "REIT" and you will find about 60 issues.... and that is on top of real estate holding by other non-real estate companies. I used to work for Verizon and real estate was so significant that we had our own real estate operating company and our own design and construction management unit.
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Old 12-27-2016, 02:47 PM   #55
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Funny, you guys crack me up. I am going to put all my eggs in 4 vanguard funds? Sorry, I just don't get it. Look at the top holdings in those funds, I hold them all as individual stocks and I don't pay an ongoing fee. I have owned Apple for years and been in and out and at the peak owned 4000 shares. I currently hold about 2500 as I just sold a batch recently when it was up to 117.

Yeah, I got 40% cash right now and I am considering going into bonds that have gotten hammered. Not stocks as I still thing there will be a meltdown in January. Noone wants to sell right now because they are afraid of taxes. Rule #1 - never let taxes interfere with your investing decisions.

I am going fixed income for a bit, will pull out when rates come up and market comes down. My investing thru the years has done me well. Believe it or not one of my bigger holdings is the vanguard S&P500 Index fund and it has doubled since I first got in. But at the same time my apple has tripled, EMC which I held thru 3 splits was a 45 bagger when i sold first batch and a 15 bagger when I sold the rest.

During the tech craze I bought into IPO's and dumped quick.

My investment decisions are not perfect, but I like to trade. Just commiting to a few funds and sitting back is not investing, it's banking. Yeah, maybe I will be there in a few more years but right now I get pleasure out of playing and trading and I am pretty conservative right now with 40% cash, yeah, 45% still in market, so I didn't miss this run-up, but I will be ready for the run-down!
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Old 12-27-2016, 03:52 PM   #56
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Funny, you guys crack me up. I am going to put all my eggs in 4 vanguard funds? Sorry, I just don't get it. Look at the top holdings in those funds, I hold them all as individual stocks and I don't pay an ongoing fee. I have owned Apple for years and been in and out and at the peak owned 4000 shares. I currently hold about 2500 as I just sold a batch recently when it was up to 117.

Yeah, I got 40% cash right now and I am considering going into bonds that have gotten hammered. Not stocks as I still thing there will be a meltdown in January. Noone wants to sell right now because they are afraid of taxes. Rule #1 - never let taxes interfere with your investing decisions.

I am going fixed income for a bit, will pull out when rates come up and market comes down. My investing thru the years has done me well. Believe it or not one of my bigger holdings is the vanguard S&P500 Index fund and it has doubled since I first got in. But at the same time my apple has tripled, EMC which I held thru 3 splits was a 45 bagger when i sold first batch and a 15 bagger when I sold the rest.

During the tech craze I bought into IPO's and dumped quick.

My investment decisions are not perfect, but I like to trade. Just commiting to a few funds and sitting back is not investing, it's banking. Yeah, maybe I will be there in a few more years but right now I get pleasure out of playing and trading and I am pretty conservative right now with 40% cash, yeah, 45% still in market, so I didn't miss this run-up, but I will be ready for the run-down!
Seems like you know what you are doing. Why are you asking us for advice?
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Old 12-27-2016, 08:04 PM   #57
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Do a google search for Lord Xot. He's a preferred stock guru and you would probably really like his portfolios.
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Old 12-27-2016, 08:39 PM   #58
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+2

No need to respond to comments from under the bridge.
The OP does have some trollish qualities and his answers to honestly given advice have reinforced that appearance. The "funny you guys crack me up" is a classic troll start to a post
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Old 12-27-2016, 09:25 PM   #59
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I tend to agree but for me it's a little bit of a hobby. With that said I will probably put bulk in funds and play with a small amount just because I like to play the market.
It's the hormones - resistance is futile. I too own 'a few good stocks.'

1966 - 2006 I tried a lot of things including some rental RE. After trying to beat 'Bogle's Folly' from 1977 in my 401k with stock picks, Pssst Wellesley, dividend stocks, and other adventures I threw in the towel at age 62 and went Vanguard Target Retirement full auto hands off for my serious money.

heh heh heh - Now I will pick a few good stocks(under 3% of portfolio) and I may, I say may venture a maximum bet of maybe $5 on the Cowboys or the Pats for the Superbowl while hoping the underdog Chiefs do well.
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Old 12-28-2016, 08:17 AM   #60
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Funny, you guys crack me up. I am going to put all my eggs in 4 vanguard funds? Sorry, I just don't get it.

You do realize that "4 Vanguard funds" contain nearly all of the world's stocks and a good representation of the world's corporate and government debt? You could not ask for a more diversified portfolio.

Simplify, keep costs to a bare minimum and don't try to beat the market. I used to think I was an above-average Lake Wobogon stock picker. Now I realize I was lucky. Or shortsighted enough to remember my successes and forget my failures.
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