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Old 12-23-2020, 07:39 AM   #21
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Since I've been actively announcing my retirement with the various teams that I interact with I've had similar thoughts about being sensitive. DH and I both have pensions which is highly unusual. Even my highly paid coworkers who are married often have a spouse that makes way less than they do with no second pension.

If people ask any follow on questions after my announcement I've just said that I am burnt out (which is completely true). One person yelled "LUCKY" at me in a meeting, one person asked me 'what month' I was leaving (her friend wants my job), and one person asked me if I was moving overseas (she knows I love extended vacations out of the country but I just laughed). I haven't told any 'real' friends yet other than people I am close to that are already retired and they are happy for me.
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Old 12-23-2020, 08:18 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Amethyst View Post

To the rest of the world, it comes across like telling all the overweight people that they could be thin, if they'd only eat less and exercise more, like you do.

That doesn't go over very well on this forum either.
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Old 12-23-2020, 08:38 AM   #23
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Back in 2011 we decided to take a few years off (practice run). It just happened to coincide with the delayed layoffs from 08-09. The manager asked me to move departments as he was laying off a very capable 78 yr old and I would fill his spot.

When I told him our plans, he thanked me and "layd me off" & saved the ole buddy's job (he worked because all his retired friends just died & he enjoyed it)...

You are definitely helping someone else by helping yourself. I didn't share it with anyone except those who asked for the next few weeks. It was a good experience for me...

All our friends were supportive as we were moving to Mexico too. Even an announcement @ church for a send-off. I "almost" shed a tear...
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Old 12-23-2020, 08:46 AM   #24
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In this season of illness, unemployment and photos of food pantries on every news site, is it insensitive to tell colleagues and customers that I'm retiring early?
No
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Old 12-23-2020, 08:50 AM   #25
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For under-50's early retirement, I think it's (always) TMI except with colleagues who are actually friends. The kind you plan to keep in touch with and have already spent time with outside of work.

The kind you are already comfortable talking about money with at all.

For 55+, eh, might be an easier sell. At 46 I kept it very quiet to just a small inner circle.
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Old 12-23-2020, 08:52 AM   #26
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Just tell them you can no longer come to the office as you've taken an oath of Solitude until this pestilence is purged from these lands.
Now you're a hero and not a wealthy slacker.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:04 AM   #27
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Even my best friends at work said that! It was meant as a compliment. Granted, I was seen as "old enough" to retire. But even if I had been younger, the most anyone would have said was to ask which Beltway Bandit I'd signed up with. And all I'd have to say was "Oh, I'm still looking at offers," even if I wasn't.

Nobody asked me about my pension or anything else financial. I would have been shocked into silence if anyone had. And so would anyone else who was listening.

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One person yelled "LUCKY" at me in a meeting, .
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:07 AM   #28
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I don't worry about what other people think. Perhaps its cold hearted, but to let what others think affect what I do, nope that would drive me crazy. People will always find a reason to have a problem with you, no matter what you do or say. Not everyone is the kind person you find on this forum.

I don't gloat. I don't rub it in. But if someone doesn't like something you do, that's for them to live with.

Be happy for yourself and live.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:16 AM   #29
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Absolutely not. Just go, don't gloat. I left when I was 56, my VP's yelling convinced me to go instead of another OMY. I made sure I personally gave him my resignation stating I was retiring not seeking more money. He was genuinely happy for me but then mentioned he had just gotten divorced at age 50 and his settlement allowed his ex to take most of his retirement.... (oh well that sucks, perhaps he yelled at home too). In any case not my problem.
Your early retirement allows someone else an opportunity, perhaps it's a wake-up, about retirement, for a peer.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:18 AM   #30
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Think of it as leaving a job opening for someone else, an act of charity
+1

"I think I have enough saved so that I don't have to work anymore, so I'm leaving my job so that someone else can have that income."

In that light, it's selfish not to retire.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:20 AM   #31
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I did't glorify it. I just said I had enough of the corporate bullshit, maybe give a couple of good examples, and say we were fortunate to plan, work hard and live within our means for decades to allow us the opportunity.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:23 AM   #32
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I did't glorify it. I just said I had enough of the corporate bullshit, maybe give a couple of good examples,
Here is, I think, where one needs to stop. Unless further interrogation ensues, no need to preach self-denial to the masses:

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and say we were fortunate to plan, work hard and live within our means for decades to allow us the opportunity.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:30 AM   #33
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I retired in 5/19. I said “yes” 3 times from 2014 until 2019. I was asked twice to come back, in the last month. for the team in which I experienced abuse, both emotional and non-violent physical (inappropriate sleep deprivation.)

I said “No”. Never, under any circumstances, give up your own life trajectory for their story. There are 7billion on this planet. They can surely find one that fits their needs more than you.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:31 AM   #34
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I did't glorify it. I just said I had enough of the corporate bullshit, maybe give a couple of good examples, and say we were fortunate to plan, work hard and live within our means for decades to allow us the opportunity.

This was my same situation. Just don't rub it in to those with low savings or other circumstances that prevents them from retiring. I worked full time since I was 15, with part-time during school, and paid my way through college on my J-O-B scholarship; so had put in plenty of time in the trenches that most coworkers had no real clue about. Most all people were happy for me; if they had an issue it was their problem, not mine. For OP, no reason to feel any guilt about leaving. Just be polite and leave on your schedule, with a huge smile on your face that last day!
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:34 AM   #35
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Here is, I think, where one needs to stop. Unless further interrogation ensues, no need to preach self-denial to the masses:
Heh.... Yep, depends on the audience.

Discussion many times turns to how we did it. One person thought we had won a lotto. Another thought parent died, like that would give us the means to retire.... And some thought I had been fired. Even after I left work I understand that some people, given my abrupt departure, thought I was fired. Those on my team then understood why I done some things I had done in the past 6 months as I planned for their success when I left.

So that's the response we give. Also encourages the "youngs" to plan for the future. But I do get your point.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:40 AM   #36
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In this season of illness, unemployment and photos of food pantries on every news site, is it insensitive to tell colleagues and customers that I'm retiring early?
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrfeh View Post
No
+1

It’s not much, if any, different in good times. There’s always people that are happy for you and those that are not. There’s always people that are on the same path and those that are not, some of which may even be jealous. Retiring early is the anomaly no matter what else is going on in the world. Just stay positive and committed and move forward with your plans.

Quick story from my past. I think I was around 40 when a guy I worked with retired at 55 (our required age for retiree healthcare). He was a great guy but more to the point, that made me realize that I could do that, and I did. Though it took me to 57.

Moral of the story - think of yourself as a role model.
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Old 12-23-2020, 09:58 AM   #37
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Thank you all for your wise and funny responses - jollystomper, I laughed out loud at your post! I will go forward saying that I'm retiring, and I'll leave off the "early" part, since it's largely self-evident. Then I'll run off into the sunset!
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Old 12-23-2020, 11:21 AM   #38
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I retired at 56. I tell people "I'm Retired" if they ask where I work. I told my siblings and mother I retired. I don't ever say "I retired early" on my own. I let the other people decide if they want to figure out if it was early, on-time, or late. If they ASK me for more details, I tell them more details.
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Old 12-23-2020, 11:37 AM   #39
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I don't see where unemployment is all that bad. US unemployment rate now at 6.4% and falling. I remember when I was a young man working, unemployment rate was over 10% and no one was handing me any free money, free groceries nor did I qualify for any sort of welfare. Insensitive? I think maybe the press is reporting a little too sensitive about unemployment.
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Old 12-23-2020, 11:38 AM   #40
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Some people said we were 'lucky' to retire early.

More like we were lucky not to have bought a house full of furniture on credit, lucky not to have bought a new car every two or three years, purchased more home than we could afford, lucky not to have taken a winter vacation every year on credit, lucky to have worked our way though university and lucky to have moved away from mommy and friends in order to move our careers forward. Lucky to have saved a little each year instead of buying trash and trinkets.

Very lucky. But so similar to others who have been lucky to retire early.

Ignore those people. They don't get it. They never will.
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