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Old 12-23-2020, 12:03 PM   #41
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I recall sitting in a meeting and I don't recall how the topic came up but I said "I've been in this field 35 years and I'm still learning something everyday". A young gal replied "35 years, why aren't you retired. Let someone else move up".

A year later, I told my managers and co-workers that I had run the numbers and there was no reason why I was spending 3 hours a day commuting for money I did not need based on the last 5 years of expenditures. They were all pretty accepting of it and wished me good luck.
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Old 12-23-2020, 01:15 PM   #42
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Oh...if people really want to know, then of course you could tell them. (And young people are a good target audience, because the naive ones need the information; the smart ones already know and are using you for confirmation bias).

Have never cared for the sort of "20 questions" you are describing, though.

Let's see, what would Miss Manners advise? "Did you win the lotto..." (ha ha, I wish, treat as joke) "Did your parents die?" (shocked silence, then, faintly, "no...." or "mmyes, years ago, why". "Were you fired" (shocked silence, "Um, No, certainly not." )

At some point, one gets fed up and then the LBYM card is played....

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Heh.... Yep, depends on the audience.

Discussion many times turns to how we did it. One person thought we had won a lotto. Another thought parent died, like that would give us the means to retire.... And some thought I had been fired. Even after I left work I understand that some people, given my abrupt departure, thought I was fired. Those on my team then understood why I done some things I had done in the past 6 months as I planned for their success when I left.

So that's the response we give. Also encourages the "youngs" to plan for the future. But I do get your point.
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Old 12-23-2020, 01:32 PM   #43
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I don't worry about what other people think. Perhaps its cold hearted, but to let what others think affect what I do, nope that would drive me crazy. People will always find a reason to have a problem with you, no matter what you do or say. Not everyone is the kind person you find on this forum.

I don't gloat. I don't rub it in. But if someone doesn't like something you do, that's for them to live with.

Be happy for yourself and live.
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Old 12-23-2020, 06:27 PM   #44
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In this season of illness, unemployment and photos of food pantries on every news site, is it insensitive to tell colleagues and customers that I'm retiring early? I've tried saying "I'm stepping back from work to pursue my interests," but that sounds like I'm having a midlife crisis and I'll be back when the money runs out (I'm not coming back).

I think I feel lingering guilt over my success. But I made many sacrifices when I was younger - including shelving unprofitable dreams in order to be a responsible wage-earner - and have been planning for retirement since 1995. It just happens that I'm retiring when other people are not doing so well.
look at it this way. you're making room for a subordinate to move up (and a subordinate to move up, and so on) or for a new outside hire which in turn may create an opening elsewhere and so on. don't gloat...never a good look at any time but neither should you feel guilty.
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Old 12-23-2020, 06:40 PM   #45
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In this season of illness, unemployment and photos of food pantries on every news site, is it insensitive to tell colleagues and customers that I'm retiring early?
Of course you're not insensitive! This is YOUR TIME to express the situation in a way that strokes your own ego to the max! Aren't you smarter, harder working and better looking than them? Didn't you turn adversity into opportunity? Don't you get something for all your sacrifices? Pour it to 'em, those ignorant, ugly, lazy fools!

Or you could just tell 'em (if you need to tell them anything at all since you're not returning anyway) that you're departing to pursue other paths in life and let it go at that.
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Old 12-24-2020, 07:36 AM   #46
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I had been planning mine since about the same time as you and the sacrifices we had to make are what got us here. I just retired a few months ago and I never thought to feel guilty about it. Even before covid, if you reveal your success or some of it, there are always going to be people who are are in a good place. Many people aren't doing well because 78% are living paycheck to paycheck and are in debt. I told coworkers that I was going to retire early and they didn't believe me, yet here I am. I admit, sometimes, it feels strange to be in a better position financially when talking to people but I'd like to think that maybe it helps some open their eyes to stop being so complacent unless they wish to work forever. I don't gloat, but I'm not going to hide the fact that I'm happy, grateful and proud of what I have accomplished. And I'd be more than happy to "pay it forward" and help anyone but no one asks. Why should I hide my happiness?
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Old 12-24-2020, 07:45 AM   #47
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It's not gloating unless you.....gloat. If someone asks why you are leaving, a simple statement that you decided to retire is sufficient. If no one asks, and you do not volunteer such information, then you're not gloating.
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Old 12-24-2020, 09:33 AM   #48
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I was working only 12 hours per week when I retired, so I was already "nearly" retired. My short answer to the question, "How are you able to retire at 45?" was simply, "No kids, no debts." I had kept it pretty mum to my coworkers except for one trusted friend who was actually encouraging me to retire, often asking me, "Why are you still working here?"


To some other coworkers if they asked me, I would remind them of the exploding value of our company stock, something the company publicized all the time. If they had been working long enough, they also enjoyed that exploding value, even if it were in their retirement saving plan.


Because I had been working only those 12 hours per week (2 days), the transition to fully retiring was hardly a big one because I had already set up a good number of personal activities in the 7 years I had been working pat-time (going to the office 1-3 days a week, working 20 hours per week in the 5.5 years before reducing that to 12).


Another thing I kept mum, for the most part, was how the 2008-09 financial crisis greatly helped my ER and has done so for the last 12 years by presenting me with a huge buying opportunity I did not expect to have when I was planning it in 2007 nd into early 2008. That might have been seen as insensitive, at least at the time. Later on, I backed away from that statement.
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Old 12-24-2020, 09:35 AM   #49
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+1

It’s not much, if any, different in good times. There’s always people that are happy for you and those that are not. There’s always people that are on the same path and those that are not, some of which may even be jealous. Retiring early is the anomaly no matter what else is going on in the world. Just stay positive and committed and move forward with your plans.

Quick story from my past. I think I was around 40 when a guy I worked with retired at 55 (our required age for retiree healthcare). He was a great guy but more to the point, that made me realize that I could do that, and I did. Though it took me to 57.

Moral of the story - think of yourself as a role model.

I have/had a similar role model.

Back in early 2017, I received a great promotion. I told my manager “great, now I will be able to retire at 58 not 60”. He said “why not 55?”

1.5 years later, that is just what he did. His wife followed when she hit 55.

Seeing someone execute their plan got me and my wife thinking. I will be 55 in June.........

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Old 12-24-2020, 10:07 AM   #50
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Perfectly good answer, to a reasonable question. Loaded questions, like "Did you inherit money?" are something else again.

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My short answer to the question, "How are you able to retire at 45?" was simply, "No kids, no debts."
.
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Old 12-24-2020, 10:23 AM   #51
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When I left at the end of my contract with mega corp in 2009 most of coworkers assumed I would take some time off and then reappear with another company in a related line of business. I was 51 at the time. Only a few close friends knew that I was basically done.

Even the company felt that I was likely going to appear somewhere else. They offered a multi year consulting deal that was basically structured like a non compete although I could do other outside work if it was not directly competitive. I could also terminate it with sixty days notice. It took me about ten seconds to agree to that!

So my suggestion is to announce whatever makes you comfortable when you are ready to leave. Being vague could end up being to your advantage. Besides, it's really nobody else's business but yours!
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Old 12-24-2020, 10:32 AM   #52
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About five yrs ago, a friend said we should retire now so that a new generation could have jobs like ours. He was speaking particularly about his children. I retired 3 years later when I met my goals. The friend is still working even though his situation is similar to mine.

Within my former work place, most people stay on for a long time so my not-so-early retirement was rare. I chose to be quiet about my retirement, but did help others with retiring questions when asked. I made my decision based on my situation and cannot be concerned about what other people thinking. Just do not gloat about it.
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Old 12-24-2020, 10:36 AM   #53
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Yes, to Rocky Mountain! I’ve never understood why anyone felt the need to announce or expect others to celebrate their retirement. I suppose if you’re in your 60s and have worked for the same company for the last 30 yrs, I get it. But that’s not been my career experience at all.

If there is a need to tell someone, I would drop the ‘early’ part and just say I’m retiring/retired. I think most people care a lot less about your life than you’d think! And those that are overly interested usually aren’t of interest to me.
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Old 12-24-2020, 11:00 AM   #54
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... I’ve never understood why anyone felt the need to announce or expect others to celebrate their retirement...
when i gave my notice to my boss the HR manager wanted to throw a retirement party for me (we were friends, not just co-workers). I asked her not to...i just wanted to quietly leave. but she was determined to go thru with it. it turned out to be a very nice baseball-themed send-off. that was on my 55th birthday. the next day i came in, turned in my ID and keys and picked up my next-to-last check. my buddy was waiting for me and asked if i was staying the whole day. i smiled and left. i attended his retirement send-off a few years ago. i think his smile was bigger than mine.
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Old 12-24-2020, 11:17 AM   #55
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I cannot imagine why anyone would think that 'early retirement' is insensitive.

Why on earth would it be
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Old 12-24-2020, 11:31 AM   #56
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I cannot imagine why anyone would think that 'early retirement' is insensitive.

Why on earth would it be
Why not? Just about everything else has been reclassified disparagingly of late.
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Old 12-24-2020, 12:19 PM   #57
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This is the part that other people don't want to hear about. Nobody outside this forum welcomes stories of "what I suffered to get where I am today." (But you can share all the details with us, and we'll even try to top your tale of deprivation).

To the rest of the world, it comes across like telling all the overweight people that they could be thin, if they'd only eat less and exercise more, like you do.
This would be an interesting topic for another thread - how much people feel they have sacrificed to achieve ER. It has probably already been the subject of a thread, I imagine. I don't feel that I sacrificed much at all, as I'm naturally wired to save, and not consume excessively. When I see posts by folk talking about how they sacrificed to achieve ER, I wonder whether it was really that hard for them, or whether they're merely feeling a little superior.

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That doesn't go over very well on this forum either.
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Old 12-24-2020, 02:20 PM   #58
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This would be an interesting topic for another thread - how much people feel they have sacrificed to achieve ER. It has probably already been the subject of a thread, I imagine. I don't feel that I sacrificed much at all, as I'm naturally wired to save, and not consume excessively. When I see posts by folk talking about how they sacrificed to achieve ER, I wonder whether it was really that hard for them, or whether they're merely feeling a little superior.
we're childless (by choice but it had nothing to do with $) so we had it a bit easier than couples with kids. we really didn't sacrifice much but had we started investing earlier than we did and purchased late model used cars rather than new we'd likely be farther ahead than we are. as it is our NW is in the low 7-figures which is our nest egg should our public pensions go poof. there's nothing to gain by coulda/shoulda/woulda at this point in time. decisions, choices were made and we're living with them. life is very good!
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Old 12-24-2020, 02:23 PM   #59
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Back in my teaching days, some of the schools used to sell bumper stickers that said something like "My child is an Honor Student as Dudley Jr. High". A few parents became offended. "What does that say about the other students?", was their big objection. The answer was simple - it said nothing about the other students. I see no problems as long as you are not putting down others. In fact, you are opening up a position somewhere for an unemployed person who probably needs the paycheck much more than you. That is good.

Just don't get a bumper sticker that says "My grandchildren are cuter than your grandchildren." Them is fighting words.
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Old 12-24-2020, 03:22 PM   #60
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This would be an interesting topic for another thread - how much people feel they have sacrificed to achieve ER. It has probably already been the subject of a thread, I imagine. I don't feel that I sacrificed much at all, as I'm naturally wired to save, and not consume excessively. When I see posts by folk talking about how they sacrificed to achieve ER, I wonder whether it was really that hard for them, or whether they're merely feeling a little superior.



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