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Old 03-18-2023, 09:09 AM   #21
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I was hoping that would be the case, only seems fair. But the published millage rate for 2023 is the same as 2022 & 2021 for our country and city despite new property values. Taxes aren't due here until Sept, so maybe there will be change?
There should be. In NC, most local authorities drop the millage after the reassessment.

But that's on an aggregate basis. So if you are in a hot area, your rates will go up, but it shouldn't be the total re-evaluation amount.

Source: lived in NC for 35 years. Never saw a tax increase close to my reassessment increase. I've seen reassessments go up 30%, but my tax went up 5%. I live in a moderately hot area.
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Old 03-18-2023, 09:47 AM   #22
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How is that possible? How are your municipal and county budgets approved?

Around here, the voters approve the municipal budget, then that gets divided by the total assessed value of the town to arrive at the mill rate. Counties around here aren't a big thing so that is just a small line item in the municipal budget.

We benefit from the fact that new homes in our area are invariably much larger and more expensive than us "townies" who've been here a while. Their values go up faster than ours, so our taxes don't jump as much as theirs. I've never actually seen them go down though.
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There should be. In NC, most local authorities drop the millage after the reassessment.

But that's on an aggregate basis. So if you are in a hot area, your rates will go up, but it shouldn't be the total re-evaluation amount.

Source: lived in NC for 35 years. Never saw a tax increase close to my reassessment increase. I've seen reassessments go up 30%, but my tax went up 5%. I live in a moderately hot area.
Online they are still showing the exact same millage for 2023 as 2019-2022, However, with some digging I found they will review the millage rates by July 1 (found that in the local paper, not the tax offices?). Furthermore, I found the county and city tax rates per $100K valuation for 2018 to 2019, last revaluation, and the millage rates decreased 24%. So while our property taxes will go up, it won't be at the same rates as valuation increases, probably much less.

Sorry, first time I've lived anywhere where property valuations changes so much!!!
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Old 03-18-2023, 09:54 AM   #23
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How is that possible? How are your municipal and county budgets approved?

Around here, the voters approve the municipal budget, then that gets divided by the total assessed value of the town to arrive at the mill rate. Counties around here aren't a big thing so that is just a small line item in the municipal budget.

We benefit from the fact that new homes in our area are invariably much larger and more expensive than us "townies" who've been here a while. Their values go up faster than ours, so our taxes don't jump as much as theirs. I've never actually seen them go down though.
Same here; plus the total revenue is capped by law so they can approve any budget they want but they can only raise $x in total in the county. Any increase in the tax base or assessments drives down property tax rates. That does create a problem because the infrastructure can't always support the base.
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Old 03-19-2023, 11:52 AM   #24
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our last property tax bill was...$26 higher than the previous year ($7390 vs $7364). $26! that's a .35% increase.
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Old 03-19-2023, 12:32 PM   #25
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I've never looked into it, but I've never seen a corresponding millage reduction with an assessment increase. It makes sense that it should, but it also makes sense that those in charge would just take the increase and spend it.

Thankfully, in Michigan, we have a homestead reduction of 50%. We also have a cap on increases of the CPI or 5%. Given the history of the CPI, historical increases have been pretty low. This year however, we're going to hit the 5% cap and people are not too happy.
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Old 03-19-2023, 12:44 PM   #26
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Here they did a new assessment in 2018 and then started a new policy of doing a new assessment every year. In the last 4 years my property has gone up 53% and my property taxes have gone up 31%. I would not actually be able to sell for what they say my property is worth though. They don't do a physical assessment they just compare "similar" homes in the area. They say my 3bd ranch is worth the same as newer nicer 3bd ranches even though it is not.
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Old 03-19-2023, 12:58 PM   #27
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In 2008 the property tax on my previous house was $864.

The assessment didn't change until I sold it and bought my Dream Home in 2015, and at that point my new home was assessed at purchase price, which seemed fair to me. Property tax at that point was $1,668.

But then we got a new, more energetic tax assessor/collector, who began actually DOING the re-assessments he was supposed to do every 4 years. (The previous guy just didn't bother).

So, last year my property tax was $2,121. This year's property tax isn't due until December, so the amount hasn't been revealed yet.

Honestly I've got no complaints thus far. From what I've read here on the forum, it could be worse.
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Old 03-19-2023, 01:15 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
Online they are still showing the exact same millage for 2023 as 2019-2022, However, with some digging I found they will review the millage rates by July 1 (found that in the local paper, not the tax offices?). Furthermore, I found the county and city tax rates per $100K valuation for 2018 to 2019, last revaluation, and the millage rates decreased 24%. So while our property taxes will go up, it won't be at the same rates as valuation increases, probably much less.

Sorry, first time I've lived anywhere where property valuations changes so much!!!
Well, if you're 65 or older & can 'manage' your income from all sources to be under the current limit of ~$34k property tax is cut in half.

Must re-qualify every year, though.
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Old 03-19-2023, 02:06 PM   #29
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When I was a fresh out of college new hire, one of the older guys in my dept commented: "If you have to pay taxes on it, you never really own it".
The corollary is: "you rent your property from the government."
I would look at it this way. You do own your property, but you need to pay for services that make living on the property possible/convenient/pleasant. Such services include schools, fire, police, sewage, community amenities such as parks, libraries, etc. and even something as mundane as mosquitos mitigation or weed abatement (where applicable). That's what the proper tax pays for. Without these services, living on the property wouldn't be very pleasant or convenient.
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Old 03-19-2023, 04:13 PM   #30
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My property taxes can’t go up more than 3% and are low to start with. Part of the formula is age of the property. My taxes are 400/year.
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Old 03-19-2023, 05:11 PM   #31
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I think I like prop 13. Our tax went up some but not a huge amount in the years at our last place. Meanwhile the market value went way up. At the new place taxes are lower because the property price was lower in this relatively LCOL area.
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Old 03-19-2023, 06:27 PM   #32
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My property taxes canít go up more than 3% and are low to start with. Part of the formula is age of the property. My taxes are 400/year.
Where is that? How do you pay for schools? Just my local public school district alone was $1760 on a $168K house.
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Old 03-19-2023, 08:46 PM   #33
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Ours went down slightly last year. I thought they assessed annually here as the assessment changes annually. At least as residents we’re limited to a 10% tax increase per year.
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Old 03-19-2023, 08:53 PM   #34
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Where is that? How do you pay for schools? Just my local public school district alone was $1760 on a $168K house.
Their next door neighbor with a new property who is assessed $10,000 pays for it

It is a very fair pyramid scheme, I mean system.
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Old 03-19-2023, 10:47 PM   #35
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I was hoping that would be the case, only seems fair. But the published millage rate for 2023 is the same as 2022 & 2021 for our country and city despite new property values. Taxes aren't due here until Sept, so maybe there will be change?
Our cabin had this issue, and so taxes went up 50% for everyone as the millage rate remained the same.
It was kept the same the 2nd year too, so I guess gov't in the tiny town like the extra cash
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Old 03-19-2023, 10:57 PM   #36
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I guess anything is possible, cost of living in paradise - LOL. But I've been in FL for 8 years, haven't seen anything close to 40% insurance increase. Highest I saw was just over 10% one year. This year change was flat.
You need to visit the Big Jump In Homeowner's Insurance thread. https://www.early-retirement.org/for...ce-117100.html

Lots of examples of significant increases in homeowner's insurance there. Mine personally went up over 50% this year, with no changes, no claims. Of course, everything around me was completely destroyed by hurricane Ian, so it's sort of understandable. Rather than being surprised that others are seeing large increases, I'm rather shocked that you aren't. But keep your head down and fingers crossed, and maybe they won't notice.
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Old 03-19-2023, 11:24 PM   #37
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Where is that? How do you pay for schools? Just my local public school district alone was $1760 on a $168K house.
I live in Reno. Property taxes in general are lower compared to many states. I spent 32 years in Wisconsin and taxes are higher. However, Wisconsin has better schools and much better social programs.
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Old 03-20-2023, 07:08 AM   #38
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You need to visit the Big Jump In Homeowner's Insurance thread. https://www.early-retirement.org/for...ce-117100.html



Lots of examples of significant increases in homeowner's insurance there. Mine personally went up over 50% this year, with no changes, no claims. Of course, everything around me was completely destroyed by hurricane Ian, so it's sort of understandable. Rather than being surprised that others are seeing large increases, I'm rather shocked that you aren't. But keep your head down and fingers crossed, and maybe they won't notice.
You probably hit it on the head, and what I mentioned previously, it's area/region specific. From your comments you obviously are in an area with higher risk of destruction and now a history of destruction. Ian didn't cause any damage in the area I'm in. And my new home built to the latest code for up to 150mph winds and no chance of storm surge due to elevation level. As I look at discounts on my policy it's shocking to me to see how much discount I get for hurricane mitigation.

And as you know, in our state another driver to higher home insurance cost is older roofs, some insurance companies no longer insuring homes with roofs over 10 years old. With a new home and tile roof that's another benefit to keep insurance costs down.

Maybe I'll see a bit come next renewal but can only comment about what I've experienced to date, who knows what the future will bring.
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Old 03-20-2023, 07:06 PM   #39
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My assessment here in Charlotte NC jumped almost 30%. But how much of an increase that translates to is extremely hard to tell. My home is only 2.5 years old, new build in a hot area. So my value surely went up compared more compared to the long time residents in older homes. However there are still a ton of new builds going up. And I donít think the city budget is going up much. So how that all pans out remains to be seen.
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Old 03-20-2023, 08:15 PM   #40
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Online they are still showing the exact same millage for 2023 as 2019-2022, However, with some digging I found they will review the millage rates by July 1 (found that in the local paper, not the tax offices?). Furthermore, I found the county and city tax rates per $100K valuation for 2018 to 2019, last revaluation, and the millage rates decreased 24%. So while our property taxes will go up, it won't be at the same rates as valuation increases, probably much less.

Sorry, first time I've lived anywhere where property valuations changes so much!!!
Property taxes generally support our local communities wants and needs. All communities need basics like schools, police, fire, roads, public buildings, sewage treatment, etc. Property taxes are like room-mates in the community splitting the bills for things we wanted and voted for. The system is based upon ďad valoremĒ (according to value) taxes levied on the resident property owners. Basically there are three parts of the equation. Valuation, Budget, Mill Levy. Counties are not allowed to run deficits. They donít generally budget for surpluses either. Their income must basically meet their expenses every year. We simply split the bills of the community we want to live in according to the values of our property. If all property values double, but the budget remains unchanged, mills would halve and taxes would remain the same. If all property values declined 50%, bills still need to be paid, and if the budget is the same, mill levies would need to double. Appraisals, whether going up or down in the community, are just one part of the equation, and cannot tell us whether taxes will be changing or how much. Tax increases are always a result of spending money. Worry if you and/or your neighbors vote YES on ballot issues that involve money. Most of the time, if you get a significant tax increase its because, you, or your neighbors voted YES on too many nice things. But sometimes a community can save money by spending money. My local volunteer fire department for instance gets a small levy, but saves me far more than their cost by reducing the cost of my homeowners policy. Another practically guaranteed tax increase comes when your valuation goes up far more than others in the community. If you build a new 4 car garage, but none of your neighbors do, expect a tax increase. If you remodel and make substantial improvements, expect a tax increase. If your home burns down, and you donít rebuild it, expect a decrease. Tax appraisals are only a problem when they are wrong. If your property is erroneously valued at a higher than market value, that would be something that needs action on your part. Appeals are often needed or at least a visit to the local assessor. If your property is erroneously valued lower than market value, you might consider keeping quiet about it. Of course there are various exceptions to the above formulas when local or state governments pass certain caps or limitations on the ability to make changes annually. When this happens, local governments must find ways to do without, or get the money elsewhere.
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