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View Poll Results: What % of your retirement stash is Taxable vs IRA, tIRA, 401k or Equivalents?
100% Tax Deferred 26 10.20%
100 % Taxable 5 1.96%
80% Deferred 20% Taxable 68 26.67%
60% Deferred 40% Taxable 42 16.47%
50% Deferred 50% Taxable 49 19.22%
20% Deferred 80% Taxable 35 13.73%
Some Other Deferred/Taxable Split 30 11.76%
Voters: 255. You may not vote on this poll

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Poll:What % of your retirement stash is Taxable vs IRA, tIRA, 401k or Equivalents?
Old 01-28-2020, 09:11 AM   #1
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Poll:What % of your retirement stash is Taxable vs IRA, tIRA, 401k or Equivalents?

I was just mulling over our 60% Taxable vs 40% Tax Deferred (tIRAs In our Case) Financial Nest Egg. I was just curious what other folks percentages were. Roth IRA falls into Tax Deferred for the ease of polling

This Poll is for Cash, Stock, Bond or equivalents. Not including Property, Homes, Cars, Tractors, Airplanes, Boats Etc.

It would help if votes were as close as possible as opposed to folks saying none fit my scenario, if that is the case, please do not vote.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:28 AM   #2
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100% Tax deferred. At 24% federal and a 6% state tax bracket, no plans on changing that. (:
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:33 AM   #3
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How do we account for Roth IRAs? 40% tax deferred, 35% taxable, 25% tax free.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:34 AM   #4
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I'm assuming you're wanting Roth money to go in the tax deferred line - even though it's not tax deferred, it's tax free?

Using that criteria, I'm unfortunately around 90% tax deferred.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:38 AM   #5
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I would put Roth IRA in Tax Deferred for simplicities sake. Update OP.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:38 AM   #6
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We are about 85% tax deferred.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:42 AM   #7
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Strange. You state mulling over a 60% Taxable plus 40% Tax Deferred allocation, yet you don't have it listed in the poll. That's about where we're at, primarily because our move from Silicon Valley (CA) to central Texas in late 2018 netted us quite a bit of cash (post capital gains taxes) after the sale of our CA house and purchase of a TX house.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:44 AM   #8
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15% Deferred (tIRA)
24% Taxable (After-tax investments)
61% Tax free (Roth)
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:46 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickA5 View Post
I'm assuming you're wanting Roth money to go in the tax deferred line - even though it's not tax deferred, it's tax free?

Using that criteria, I'm unfortunately around 90% tax deferred.
I also find this a problem. I'm 55/30/15 tax-deferred/tax-free/taxable. I followed your advice and chose the 80/10 split in your poll, but I think you should want tax-free money aligned with taxable (lower tax on gains is more in line with tax free money than it is with ordinary income rates on tax deferred).
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:46 AM   #10
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Just about half and half.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:49 AM   #11
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When I retired at the end of 2011, I was 44% taxable, 53% tax-deferred and 3% tax-free.

Since then I have done lots of Roth conversions which moves funds from tax-deferred to tax free and until a couple years ago we used taxable for spending and taxes on Roth conversions.

Today we are 18% taxable, 55% tax-deferred and 27% tax-free. Taxable has stayed the same because growth has exceeded Roth conversions.

I recently changed tactic and we are leaving taxable alone so I expect that it will grow wih equity returns (and hopefully eventually get a stepped-up basis so unrealized appreciation is never taxed). Tax-deferred will decline slightly as a result of annual Roth conversions exceeding interest income and tax-free will grow steadily as equity returns and annual Roth conversions exceed withdrawals for spending.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:51 AM   #12
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Were 50-50. Its working out nicely for us.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:56 AM   #13
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Not sure which button to vote with, other covers a lot of ground? About 30% tax deferred but that’ll mostly be tax free in 5-7 years.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:59 AM   #14
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We had an extensive poll on this not long ago, I think.
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:14 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
We had an extensive poll on this not long ago, I think.
Yep.

http://www.early-retirement.org/foru...ed-100411.html
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:19 AM   #16
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Much thanks!

OP - your answers have already been collected at the link above. And most folks were higher than 40% tax deferred.
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:25 AM   #17
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69% tax-deferred. I didn't vote.
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Old 01-28-2020, 12:47 PM   #18
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50%, but currently spending taxable, so eventually close to 100% tax-deferred.
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Old 01-28-2020, 12:55 PM   #19
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Too much for me! One of my mistakes....I was too anxious to tax defer.
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Old 01-28-2020, 12:57 PM   #20
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I'm spending down the IRA while tax rates are low.
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