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should I stay or should I go?
Old 04-10-2021, 04:46 PM   #1
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should I stay or should I go?

I've been reading through the enough and various job threads and it inspired me to ask about my recent thoughts at changing jobs late in my career. I've been debating if I should change jobs or stay at my current position until retirement and I'm curious to know what others think.

I'm around 7 years from retirement. My current job is good: I enjoy my coworkers, boss is great, the work is familiar/easy, I can find challenges if I get bored and the company is good (for the most part). Also, I now have the option to work fully remote. I'll probably still go in the office a few times a month, but I could easily work from remote locations for longer periods of time with no complaints from my management.

The downside is that the company has changed. We've lost a lot of good employees over the last few years and the company is ok with this. When issues come up, you can tell that the lack of expertise is missing, which can be annoying. It might be getting a little better, but for the most part, I just deal with it and don't let it phase me. The other downside is overall compensation. It's still good, but compared to positions I can find elsewhere, it looks to be significantly lower, probably 30-40% less. However, based on my conservative estimates, I'll hit my number in 6-7 years without changing jobs.

I ran some rough calculations with the compensation from a new job and I could probably knock 2 years off of my target retirement date, but realistically, I'd probably work for 7 more years regardless. So changing jobs would result in a more comfortable retirement. More money is always appreciated!

The downside with changing jobs is that even though I'd make more, I'd probably have to work a lot harder, especially for the first few years. I'm also skeptical that I'd have the full remote option or if I do, it wouldn't be as flexible as my current job.

I realize that this is very much a first world problem for me. I should probably find a hobby and ride out the current job, but the thought of extra money and new challenges has its appeal. It'd also be nice have more BTD experiences, even though this might happen anyways since my forecasting is conservative.

So has anybody else changed jobs late in their career for more work and extra money? Or did they ride out their current easier job until retirement? If given this choice, what factors would you consider to be most important?
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Old 04-10-2021, 05:03 PM   #2
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I’m 54 and have 6 years left before retiring. I love my job and have no interest in staying over again and having to prove myself. Not worth it to me.
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Old 04-10-2021, 05:16 PM   #3
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"If given this choice, what factors would you consider to be most important?"


You like your boss and enjoy your coworkers. That is worth way more than money to me, so, it it were me, I'd stay put.
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Old 04-10-2021, 05:23 PM   #4
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If your pay is 30-40% lower than comparable positions at other companies, perhaps it’s time to ask for a raise.
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Old 04-10-2021, 05:51 PM   #5
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If your pay is 30-40% lower than comparable positions at other companies, perhaps it’s time to ask for a raise.
That's not going to happen. Part of why we've lost a lot of people is because they can make more elsewhere and the company has encouraged this.

I've spent a bit of time looking at compensation and in terms of base salary, my company seems to be in the ballpark of other companies. Where they lag is in stock compensation and bonuses, which are higher elsewhere. Plus, you can get significant signing bonuses.
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Old 04-10-2021, 06:39 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gremlin View Post
"If given this choice, what factors would you consider to be most important?"


You like your boss and enjoy your coworkers. That is worth way more than money to me, so, it it were me, I'd stay put.
Stay put .....you can thank me in a few years. Plus 1
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Old 04-10-2021, 07:07 PM   #7
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Should I stay or should I go?

If I stay there will be trouble
If I go it will be double
So c'mon and let me know
Should I stay or should I go

It's always tease tease tease
You're happy when I'm on my knees
One day is fine and next is black
So if you want me off your back
Well come on and let me know
Should I stay or should I go?

All the wisdom of the world is in rock & roll -
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Old 04-10-2021, 08:17 PM   #8
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It's up to you. If the current situation affects you mentally/emotionally in a negative way, and you believe a new company will improve this, make the change.

If you can bear with the situation until you retire, do that.

It's your choice.
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Old 04-10-2021, 09:16 PM   #9
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It's your choice.

Yep, and I do have a preference.

Just curious what others think, especially if they went through something similar.

The trend so far is about what I expected.
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Old 04-10-2021, 10:58 PM   #10
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I had a similar situation, I could have taken a mgmt position with better pay. But it would have meant goodbye to remote work and a certain amount of uncertainty about if I would have liked it as much. I stayed where I was and didn’t regret it. The company also didn’t care about turnover much either, but once I decided they’d last as a going concern at least through my target retirement date. I just did my best within that 40 hr work week , with the odd crunch week thrown maybe one or two times a year. I started prioritizing things I wanted to do in retirement ( trekking , music ) over work more. I was able to do that because I had my current position well under control . I doubt I would have been able to do that if I moved on. In the end that was worth the extra time to reach my retirement target for me.
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Old 04-11-2021, 03:41 AM   #11
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If your boss is a good person, I would put the salary issue on the table in a gentle way. Not "fix this right now" but more "I'd like to discuss." When people put it gently to me, I usually make a note of it, check on whether they are under-paid, and begin to move the salary wheels in steps to close any legitimate gap. When they hold their breath and stamp their feet, I take no action quietly move them down on my potential list for promotion because they're demonstrating a real emotional immaturity.

If you're boss doesn't work that way, I would take some interviews at other companies to see if the opportunities are real.

I've seen a lot of people get it in their head that management is a bunch of dullards and the grass will be greener elsewhere...only to find out that they couldn't get those jobs or they weren't as advertised. (That includes me by the way. I shopped myself hard several years ago only to discover that life was quite good where I was.)

If you do land one of those jobs -- and the various money/work/life balances appear to be better -- decide if you're REALLY prepared to leave or not. If so, see if the company matches the pay. Otherwise, leave.

But, remember that the grave yard is full of irreplacable people. DO NOT threaten to leave unless you're prepared to follow through.

I've had more than one person walk into my office thinking they were holding the cards on a big salary negotiation only to have me shake their hand and wish them best of luck in their new role. Oh...and no need to stick around for a few weeks to transition. We'll be fine. For your own good we'll get you out of the IT systems by end of the day, so there is no risk of being accused of taking company info with you.

More often than not I was happy they initiated it because they weren't really at the top of the talent pile anyway. Never missed them.
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Old 04-11-2021, 04:19 AM   #12
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Stay put .....you can thank me in a few years. Plus 1
+2 Would not want to prove myself late in my career. Too risky.
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Old 04-11-2021, 04:22 AM   #13
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Twenty three years before I retired I was offered a job in which I had considerable experience and could easily start without missing a step. It would also double my income. They were generous with their offers but I chose the career path and the lifestyle that I loved. Those were 23 great years. No regrets for not chasing the dollar and I was still able to retire comfortably.
I would think about a few things before making my decision. Since the present company is changing then what is do you think it will be like to work for them in a few more years? By changing to a new company will their grass be any greener? In what ways would your lifestyle change?


Cheers!
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Old 04-11-2021, 06:22 AM   #14
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A bird in the hand is worth 2 in the bush.
I understand the changing workplace dynamics and attitude's.... part of the reason I'm not staying any longer myself. but I'll have a pension from it.

We have a large transport service in the next county that pays almost double, and all the overtime you want....and many of our medics have gone there part time, a couple quit and went full time....
ALL of them have quit there due to the work conditions....

Your comfortable and like where your at, And planning on working the same amount of time., so I would be incline to stay. It wouldn't hurt to ask for a little more
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Old 04-11-2021, 06:48 AM   #15
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I spent 29 years in an organization that valued people, their knowledge, contributions to the organization. The last 5 years the founding C levels left and it became what have you done for me in the last hour. The culture became impossible too, with ne'erdowell's trying to impress the shiny new management.

I moved from one part of Megacorp to another, grass is greener, right? It was worse. One day during a 14 hour conference call my new VP wanted to rip me a new one(he didn't like what I correctly told him the customer's issue was) and I decided I was done.

I'm watching today, eight years later, as the last of that workforce is in being dismantled. Buildings begin sold off and a lifetime of thousands of people's careers being cast aside.

If I had to choose over I'd stay at a place that valued people over nonsense.
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Old 04-11-2021, 07:46 AM   #16
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I would definitely stay. The good things you have in your job money can’t buy.
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Old 04-11-2021, 07:49 AM   #17
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My two cents...

About 15 years ago, I had decided to leave my job because of lack of support from my boss. Boss eventually apologized profusely, but I thought I'd go anyway, because the money and retirement benefits would have been better at the new place. The working conditions would have been harder, though, and, as there have said, I'd have had to "prove myself" and build my reputation all over again, and life would not be easy until I had.

I interviewed for and got the job I was looking for.

I discussed it endlessly with my hubby and anyone I knew who could give me a solid opinion. It was about evenly spit between stay and go.

On the day of the deadline to accept or reject, I sat on the stairs outside of the building of the new job and thought and thought, until just before 5:00, and then went in and turned it down.

I get less retirement now because of that decision, but it is enough. And with the very good support from a boss who felt bad about how he'd treated me (smile!) I really enjoyed working there, until about three years before I eventually retired, when management changed for the worse. But by then, I'd decided to stick it out no matter what, and did.
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Old 04-11-2021, 08:56 AM   #18
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They say "If you enjoy your job,you will never work a day in your life."


It sounds like you are fairly happy where you are. We all want more money. But is it worth the stress and having to potentially change to something you might not like? Once we get to a certain level where money is not quite so important. To me being happy at my job rates a lot higher than money. It is where I spend the biggest part of my time,and if I were to be miserable my health would probably suffer. And health is something that money can't buy.
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Old 04-11-2021, 11:10 AM   #19
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It sounds like you have very good employment--you like your job, can work remotely, like your co workers and your boss, will make enough to retire comfortably in 6-7 years.

Positives to new job--more money, a greater challenge, possibly retiring two years earlier due to income (but you say you would work 6-7 years more anyway, so that doesn't seem to count)

For me, the stress of changing jobs, new co workers and boss to become accustomed too when I am so close to retirement would be a No Go.
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Old 04-11-2021, 03:36 PM   #20
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Lots of great responses. Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mh View Post
I had a similar situation, I could have taken a mgmt position with better pay. But it would have meant goodbye to remote work and a certain amount of uncertainty about if I would have liked it as much. I stayed where I was and didn’t regret it. The company also didn’t care about turnover much either, but once I decided they’d last as a going concern at least through my target retirement date. I just did my best within that 40 hr work week , with the odd crunch week thrown maybe one or two times a year. I started prioritizing things I wanted to do in retirement ( trekking , music ) over work more. I was able to do that because I had my current position well under control . I doubt I would have been able to do that if I moved on. In the end that was worth the extra time to reach my retirement target for me.
I've been offered management roles and have always politely declined. I'd have to attend way more meetings and I never wanted to give up the flexibility I have as an independent contributor. Unless the company is sold, etc, my job should be safe until retirement.

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Originally Posted by Closet_Gamer View Post
If you do land one of those jobs -- and the various money/work/life balances appear to be better -- decide if you're REALLY prepared to leave or not. If so, see if the company matches the pay. Otherwise, leave.

But, remember that the grave yard is full of irreplacable people. DO NOT threaten to leave unless you're prepared to follow through.
I'd never make any demands from an employer even if I was leaving. I'd be hesitant to create a situation where, "you pay me more or I'm gone." If you stay that could leave a bad impression with your management and you might not be treated well in the future. I want to maintain good relations with everyone I work with (and always have).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Badger View Post
Twenty three years before I retired I was offered a job in which I had considerable experience and could easily start without missing a step. It would also double my income. They were generous with their offers but I chose the career path and the lifestyle that I loved. Those were 23 great years. No regrets for not chasing the dollar and I was still able to retire comfortably.
I would think about a few things before making my decision. Since the present company is changing then what is do you think it will be like to work for them in a few more years? By changing to a new company will their grass be any greener? In what ways would your lifestyle change?
I find that the grass is never greener, it can take a while to figure out the shades of green. That's the nice thing about a new job: it takes a while before you start seeing and recognizing the negatives. And in the meantime, the work can be fun (or else why go?), so that keeps you busy too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pacergal View Post
It sounds like you have very good employment--you like your job, can work remotely, like your co workers and your boss, will make enough to retire comfortably in 6-7 years.

Positives to new job--more money, a greater challenge, possibly retiring two years earlier due to income (but you say you would work 6-7 years more anyway, so that doesn't seem to count)

For me, the stress of changing jobs, new co workers and boss to become accustomed too when I am so close to retirement would be a No Go.
This is the direction I'm leaning. This has been a good exercise for me, and who knows, maybe an opportunity will come a long that will be too enticing to pass up. But at this point, I should embrace the remote work life, keep contributing positively to my team, and find some new hobbies to keep me busy.
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