Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-27-2020, 04:34 PM   #41
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Koolau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Leeward Oahu
Posts: 5,650
When I (self) declared my Financial Independence at 51, I guess maybe I was "nervous" because I didn't retire at that time. I SAY it was because I still liked what I was doing. Several years later when I didn't like what I was doing I retired without any nervousness. YMMV
__________________
Ko'olau's Law -

Anything which can be used can be misused. Anything which can be misused will be.
Koolau is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-27-2020, 05:19 PM   #42
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 217
It is a huge decision to walk away from steady income. I did at 47. My WR is well below 4%. I have lots of hobbies and young kids. More importantly, I was burned out on rat race of Corporate America. While I had a significant role performing a ďstrategic initiativeĒ, I knew I didnít need work to feel productive, useful or get my ego stroked. When I was confident my financial position trumped the rat race stress, I made the decision.

Itís been a year. I am stress free. Life is great. I do what I want to do for the most part and very little of what somebody else tells me I have to do.

One comment you made we seem to have in common. Daily exercise has become one of my key priorities and accomplishments. Itís aerobic and weight lifting along with several sports (favorite being golf where Iím lowering my handicap). So refreshing to do this without historical burden of constantly thinking about work.

For me, time still moves fast. Iím very fortunate to be spending it on my terms and not that of an employer.

Is work the best part of your day or week?
WhenIsItTime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2020, 06:19 PM   #43
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 457
I was a nervous wreck Before I retired.
Stormy Kromer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2020, 10:56 AM   #44
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 7,364
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
I was nervous because the portfolio had just melted down and DW was still enjoying work.

I spent 2 years as a private trader, and by the the time my wife was ready, our portfolio measured up too. After that everthing else seemed easy. I quit all my Board positions the following year.
__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2020, 12:55 PM   #45
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Houston
Posts: 93
Three years ago, we were both working but kids were off to college. We were in good shape financially and could see light at the end of the tunnel. To battle empty nester syndrome, we decided to take dance lessons, plan more trips and couple activities together.

Early last year, we hit out target xxx NW number, and DW became unhappy with her BS bucket so she quit. I continued to work for 6 more months until 2 of our 3 kids graduated from college with good jobs lined up. I then gave notice at work, retired at 60 and we lived on our savings. DW was really nervous about it. When COVID hit, our NW took a hit and the anxiety level went way up. But I was still glad that I did not have to work and continued to enjoy our limited activities during the pandemic.

If you have enough money and have other things to do with your free time, then jump in. The water is fine. I am glad I did.
Green Papaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2020, 05:03 PM   #46
Recycles dryer sheets
Navigator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Little Rock
Posts: 205
I was definitely nervous about retiring. I liked my job but felt I had to leave because of health problems, so was really torn about what to do. Retirement is a huge life change - I think it is natural to be nervous about it.
Navigator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2020, 05:26 PM   #47
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 229
Three months before retiring, I started making a list of ďwhat Iím not going to missĒ; read Zelinski books, made a travel bucket list; put a last day music play list together to listen to on the ride home; had a long list of projects and made a list of what to enjoy in solitude (DH wanted to keep working) and what to do to treat loneliness.

Five years later, still working to clear the project list, read the not miss list occasionally for a good laugh, continue editing the travel bucket list. Although, travel is temporarily on hold. Still enjoy the play list. Have yet to experience loneliness and am prepared should it occur.

Also, slept 10 - 12 hours every night for more than a year. Now, 7 - 8 hours. Can count on one hand the number of naps taken since retirement.

All in all, zero regrets. Loving life and looking forward to whatís next.

I hope your experience is all this and more!
Sanstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2020, 05:38 PM   #48
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 447
I was nervous only because I could not continue to do what I did all my life and understood clearly that the best part of my life was over. Sure there is freedom with FI retirement and if not for Covid, we would travel as we did twice, sometimes 3 times a year. In conclusion: enjoy your freedom and FI because our lives are not lasting forever. Many people could not retire even at 70. On the other hand DW sister was preparing to retire at 55 with the Standford retirement plan but died of cancer at 52. That is another main reason not to worry if you have enough and retired.
VFK57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2020, 08:36 PM   #49
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Way up North
Posts: 392
Today is my retirement day. Not nervous, but it is an emotional day. I packed my bags and cleared out my room at camp this morning. Caught the company air charter to town for the last time. My crew had a small barbecue at the worksite last night to celebrate my retirement. It is good to go out while still on "top of my game" but I know that time is marching on and retirement is a big milestone marking the passage of time. Lots of stuff to do and and only a finite but unknown time to do it with.

I am going out on a very lucky note. I had planned to retire this year from several years ago, but serendipitously mega-corp decided to sell the asset at almost the exact time I would have gone anyway. Resulted in a nice severance windfall. Money isn't likely to be much of a limiting factor for me, which makes me fortunate and grateful. Having fairly simple wants and needs is a help as well.

On to the next phase
__________________
Retired 9/30/20 at age 61 from Evil Mega Big Oil Corp (EMBO corp)
A day in retirement is like a day on the farm. Every meal's a banquet. Every day's a parade. Every SS & pension check a fortune!
bada bing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2020, 09:48 PM   #50
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by bada bing View Post
Today is my retirement day. Not nervous, but it is an emotional day. I packed my bags and cleared out my room at camp this morning. Caught the company air charter to town for the last time. My crew had a small barbecue at the worksite last night to celebrate my retirement. It is good to go out while still on "top of my game" but I know that time is marching on and retirement is a big milestone marking the passage of time. Lots of stuff to do and and only a finite but unknown time to do it with.



I am going out on a very lucky note. I had planned to retire this year from several years ago, but surreptitiously mega-corp decided to sell the asset at almost the exact time I would have gone anyway. Resulted in a nice severance windfall. Money isn't likely to be much of a limiting factor for me, which makes me fortunate and grateful. Having fairly simple wants and needs is a help as well.



On to the next phase


Congrats! I believe my DH left the same mega-Corp way up north, about 21 years ago. Was a pretty big surprise to him, took awhile to recover, but ended up being good for both of us. Enjoy your new freedom.
Time2re is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2020, 05:26 AM   #51
Full time employment: Posting here.
WestUniversity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 624
Absolutely! Reworked our numbers about a thousand times and also met with a financial planner/advisor. Everything said yes. Was still concerned about stepping off, so to speak. Itís counterintuitive to work so hard to get a job and to work so hard to keep it and then to voluntarily walk away from it into a untested future. All my efforts however paid off. Iíve been retired for almost two years and the planning worked perfectly. It was absolutely the right decision.
__________________
Whatever failures I have known, whatever errors I have committed, whatever follies I have witnessed in private and public life have been the consequence of action without thought... - Bernard Baruch
WestUniversity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2020, 08:50 AM   #52
Recycles dryer sheets
Vacation4us's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 421
My retirement date is fast approaching in December. DH retires 11/2.

As a nurse I completely understand where your coming from. I have had some second thoughts myself. I am making the most money I have ever made as a nurse and walking away seems counterintuitive to me right now. We move back to SoCal in December. I could keep my job and travel here once a month for 8 days with all the headaches that entails or I could look for work close to home at 50% of what I make now. Neither sounds appealing. So retirement it is.

I am nervous I am excited I am crazy but it’s happening.

Good luck to you!
Vacation4us is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2020, 03:51 PM   #53
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 69
I was never nervous.
I worked very hard for relatively little. I have always been able to enjoy a lifestyle that fits my income. Sometimes itís caviar, sometimes tuna. Both are good.
kingkarmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2020, 03:59 PM   #54
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 65
I was quite concerned about anxiety after I retired. The opponent happened. I was relaxed, and began enjoying my life. I retired at 59.5 years young and have never looked back. Enjoy your retirement.
msanniee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2020, 04:08 PM   #55
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 420
I was only nervous about the large amount of stock options I had to cash, and figuring out the tax implications. It spiked a bit when the stock market became volatile. Everything else was relatively calm.
Toocold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2020, 04:28 PM   #56
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 4,854
I was driven my whole life by a fear of being old and poor and by the mantra, "No matter what happens, do NOT touch the retirement funds". I'd planned to work till age 65 but my BS bucket was full at age 61 and consults with planners from two firms confirmed what my simplistic spreadsheet projections told me: I'd be OK.

That was 6 years ago and I'm in better shape than I would have expected so I've relaxed a lot. The one metric I keep checking, in addition to the fancy models, is average annual increase in invested assets since retirement; right now it's at 3%/year AFTER withdrawals. That tells me my spending is sustainable.
athena53 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2020, 05:14 PM   #57
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 126
Left work in March and bought a house that I spent way too much on that needs way too much work. Then Covid became a reality. Got hit with hail storm, insurance only covered small percent of of it then the AC went out. Wasn't nervous then, but getting there now after having to spend an extra 21K on the house, right off the bat.
nobody is offline   Reply With Quote
Tomorrow Not Promised
Old 10-02-2020, 06:15 PM   #58
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 60
Tomorrow Not Promised

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1242Vintage View Post
I wasnít nervous about retirement for a few reasons.

Financially the decision was easy since the monthly pension I was eligible to draw became larger than my paycheck at that point. Not going to deal with all the BS of working for nothing!

And before retirement I was working and living (at my own expense) in Los Angeles, 500 miles away from my permanent residence. Rent on a decent condo in LA plus flying back home every weekend was $3k a month. Retirement let me shed those costs.

And finally, there was a little voice in the back of my head that kept reminding me that my father dropped dead of a heart attack at age 56 and never took the opportunity to retire with Mom. I turned 56 in April 2020, listened to that voice and retired on May 1, 2020.

Now getting to spend my days enjoying life with my lovely bride ... just celebrated 33 years of marriage yesterday!
Congrats! We all are aware life is too short, donít wait too long ya #ís good Firecalc - Time is of essence
Work Work Work Work think like Socrates take it Ez

Say, you love your work, thatís a good thing but ER is clearly an emphasis here , call it a day ~ early.

Nervous like kid on Christmas 🎄 morning I like that too. Super early just before 40? Wow! ER indeed!
My last day really working was in May 2016 I was 49
nearly 50. At 51, fully cut the cord.

Thatís what retirement Freedom can really enhance, time with family, friends, and fun! Albeit, Covid adjustments these days. Travel is mostly out for now although we drive to Cali coast to chase blue skies. No place like home I say...play it safe right.

It would seem youíve tapered from full-time to part-time similar path I had so cut the cord - some work too long never get to this point. Iíve volunteered, run for local office, feel life full of purpose but specialize in leisure...but thatís why I worked, saved, deferred, early sacrifices - Bored of leisure? Iím Not Tired Yet!

DW has been an RN still works remotely but not for long says sheís ready join the ER group at 50.

Like this post #50 nice round number. Great ideas and encouragement on this site but main objective is ER enjoy your time your way ~ tomorrow? Today!
Live Large is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2020, 07:14 PM   #59
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4nursebee View Post
And yet, the thought of quitting work is scary. This despite saving too much.
...
Is this what it was like for you? How did you deal with it? How long did it take for the nerves and anxiety to get better?
I'd really like to be on the other side of this decision.
Thanks,
4RNB
Lots of replies about money. But, if I read your post right, the issue you're wrestling with isn't finances.

I walked away with a package one year ago at age 53. Like you, I was fully FI.
I haven't missed the work -- years of retrenchment had taken the joy away -- but I do miss the people and the routine. Those aren't easy things to replace.

On a forum like this you will hear from lots of ER cheerleaders -- it's the site's raison d'etre. But the transition is a big one -- you don't need to rush it.

I liked the advice from @MarieIG in post #30: take a leave of absence and punt the final decision. There is no downside in that.
maplefireseeker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2020, 07:18 PM   #60
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Prior Lake
Posts: 24
I'm still scared but it's worth every bit of it. I retired early with just enough to make it as I somewhat frugally was; with some buffer. I feel extremely blessed that I have chosen this path. I see too many friends and family die too young before then get to enjoy much. The risk is highly worth it! It do drool a bit when a friend or such buys a new Tesla; It's still worth the freedom and much less stress
wildbilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Were expenses what you thought after you retired? beachfire Life after FIRE 81 07-09-2017 01:27 PM
Nervous, just plain nervous limpid lizard FIRE and Money 48 11-13-2007 09:18 AM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:20 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.