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Old 02-09-2021, 02:29 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by HI Bill View Post
Ha ha! Yes, I remember in high school, returning from Spring break or Christmas break, and having forgotten the combo!
Heh, heh, my old high school is long gone and I think I had a key lock? BUT I still recall exactly where my locker was in JrHigh, I recall the locker no. and I recall the combo. I'm betting I could still go back there today and open the locker as they never changed the combos. YMMV
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it's common in gov
Old 02-11-2021, 11:33 AM   #62
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it's common in gov

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Originally Posted by ATX78701 View Post
Iím planning to give my two weeks notice next Monday Feb 15. Last day for my plan is March 1 (benefit for me so that I can get an extra month of benefits on the companyís nickel). I wanted to give more notice but after reading advice on this board and from close friends, I decided that too much notice would give the company the power as they can fire at will. Although I want the best for my colleagues and the company, the company has itís own agenda. I realized one of the reasons I wanted to announce early was because of my ego: I would be the first to ER from Megacorp in a long time. Even typing that feels like unnecessary bragging. I decided that industry two weeks notice was sufficient.

I visited with HR asking a series of ďwhat-ifsĒ around retirement looking at four years in the future to throw them off the scent of an immediate departure. Iím really glad that I did because I was mistaken by one big thing. HRís belief is that if a person give two weeks notice on Feb 15 and then plans to take vacation during that time (be it for the solid two weeks or the final three days), then payroll cuts off when that vacation commence and you just get paid the vacation time - so my plan to use PTO the final two weeks wouldnít have worked. They want us in that chair until the final bell rings.
That's what is called "terminal leave" and in the gov isn't allowed by many agencies.
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remember the combo? I didn't even remember where the locker was!
Old 02-11-2021, 11:38 AM   #63
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remember the combo? I didn't even remember where the locker was!

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Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Still can't remember that locker combination, eh?
Did you ever attend the classes of the course that you are sitting a final exam for?
The high school was beyond capacity at that time... multiple people per locker.
Fact: for one of the years, the school had 24 hour classes! Three shifts !! (they fast tracked another school... it was found, a few years later, to have lots of problems)
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Old 02-12-2021, 03:41 PM   #64
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My employment contract called for a minimum 30 days notice, but the CEO made a plea for 6 months notice for physicians. I kept quiet, then notified Human Resources and the scheduler 6 months in advance, in order to avoid hard feelings within my medical group. DH asked me if I was worried if they would terminate me earlier with such a long notice. I said I wasnít worried because we were always so short-handed. DH then asked what about a longer notice? I said I was worried the scheduler would take the opportunity to schedule me to work every major holiday, as well as more undesireable call schedules. I think I left on good terms.
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Old 02-12-2021, 03:49 PM   #65
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^ good that you did not leave on a sour note as it seems important to you.
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Old 02-12-2021, 04:35 PM   #66
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Generally a bad decision in my opinion.

You need to understand that if the shoe were on the other foot, employer would give you the minimum notice possible - could even be a Friday pink slip telling you not to come to work on Monday. Nearly all employment these days is "free will", which means employee can quit/resign/retire at any time for any reason or no reason at all, and employer can terminate at any time for any reason or no reason at all.

Also realize that no employee is irreplaceable. We all love to think that we have very specialized knowledge, are top performers, and employer would be in a terrible bind if we resigned with minimal notice. Get over that line of thinking immediately. We all are very good at what we do. Likewise, there are others who could fill our shoes. Maybe not immediately, but over time, and employer would roll with it and do just fine.

So, if you're truly concerned about employers well-being, give 30 days or less (I'd suggest no more than 2 weeks), offer to document what you do and are doing so your replacement has something to work from and get up to speed. Giving more than 30 days serves no good purpose, other than making yourself feel good. Between 30 days and 6 months, there's potential for employer to make your life difficult...they could throw extra work at you, expect more of you, or even terminate you to avoid paying you for another 6 months.

Be sure that you are sure of what you do and the reason for doing it. Again, if the shoe were on the other foot, employer would not do the same for you.
Agreed, those days of loyalty are long gone! Iíd give 30 days and let the Company counter if they want to keep you on longer.
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Old 02-12-2021, 04:57 PM   #67
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mega corp is a different world. The family I work for, I will offer to come back and do part time to the limits of my pension. It won't be a hard break.
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Unvested options
Old 02-12-2021, 05:09 PM   #68
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Unvested options

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Originally Posted by anothercog View Post
Senior people tend to give really long notice at my company. Oftentimes they will transition to part time and slowly hand off their responsibilities before finally exiting. I'd be inclined to do that if it means they would accelerate vesting of unvested stock grants. Otherwise, 30 days seems plenty.
I read the fine print in my options agreement. Once you give notice, your unvested ones can be withdrawn even if you are still working.
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Old 02-12-2021, 05:10 PM   #69
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My DH told his boss at Megacorp (which starts with a big ol' G) that he'd be retiring early 2 1/2 years before the event. Then he confirmed the date about two months before he'd be leaving, but Boss didn't believe him until he walked out the door when he said he would. Didn't even post his position until the DH left town so we could move to another state and our forever home. This was May 2014.

The boss begged DH to stay on until the end of the year, telecommuting and occasionally flying back for face to face meetings. DH did and it was nice to pick up some more quarterly stock disbursements and not have to switch to COBRA quite so soon. He trained his replacement and even 7 months after the big announcement when he left for the VERY last time, his co-workers still threw him a retirement party.

An early head's up about his retirement plans didn't hurt in our case. It's really nice to be needed and the DH left on his own terms and on a high note professionally and personally. YMMV
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Old 02-12-2021, 05:11 PM   #70
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Maybe look at this from a different point of view. How about giving them 30 day notice, and then letting them know you are willing to stick around for an extra 60 days should they need it. You say the company has been good to you, and that there are no concerns. Giving your 30 day notice 30 days before you intend to quit, with the possibility of staying a bit longer would accomplish a few things: 1) you didn't put yourself in a possible six month negative situation 2) you have shown some courtesy to your employer who you say has treated you right 3) if you do stick around, you are the 'good guy' ... the 'great guy' going out the door for 'helping out'.


Rather than making this a stressor, this tactic could make it an opportunity.


Just my two cents.
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Here's My Advice
Old 02-12-2021, 05:12 PM   #71
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Here's My Advice

Assuming that there's no pension plan that requires extra notification to get your payments rolling.

Begin doing things that will help ensure an orderly exit and transition:
  • Document your processes
  • Write a job description for your replacement
  • Save your contacts/collect personal contact information for the people you want to still talk to after you leave

Then announce your decision 30 days out and let them know that you will help with the transition, and share the stuff you prepared over that 30 days as you close out your projects.
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Old 02-12-2021, 05:17 PM   #72
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Being nice about things can have advantages.
I had worked for a small village for 30 years and my contract allowed them or me to end the employment with no notice.
But they treated me well and valued my work, so I gave a notice of "when will it be easy to replace me?" They asked me to find my own replacement, which took several months. I planned to stick around part time for a couple of weeks working as an assistant to help the new boss get acclimated. He turned out to be a good man to work for and work with, and he liked the situation; the village was pleased with the arrangement, so I stayed on working a few hours a week for three more years.
a win-win for everyone.
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Old 02-12-2021, 06:53 PM   #73
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I am only required to give 30 days' advance notice of retirement, but I have been with my employer for a long time, I have generally been treated very well, and the employer would certainly benefit from having more notice. So I am thinking that I would give about 6 months' notice. I have no concern they would terminate me when I give the notice (they would never do that, and on the one-in-a-million chance that I'm wrong about that, I would not care). Other than that, what might I not be thinking of? Are there reasons why I should not give, say,, 6 months' notice? I can't think of any, but maybe there's something I'm not thinking of?
I think it all depends on your job skills. If your job skills are still valuable, then your employer should consider you an asset. I recommend not burning your bridges. They may want to hire you back at a higher salary if they cannot find a replacement.

I used to work as a government engineer for the county public works department. I had a unique skill of calming the public when they feel that the county was screwing them over. The public would come to the counter yelling and screaming about how unfair the county permits are or how high their property taxes are. My co-workers, supervisor and a second level manager all wanted me to stay because nobody wanted to perform that function. I simply informed them that I do not have an infinite life and I hate to continue working and then die the next day after I retire. After my retirement, I continue to have lunch with my co-workers because I had considered them as friends.

On the other hand, if your job skills are not unique and your job can be conducted by most people or you had a past argument with a supervisor or a manager, you have to be much more careful. The foundation of most relationships depend on "trust". Can you "trust" management not to screw you....just before your retirement? This can happen and I have seen that happened to a co-worker. Supervisors and managers have long memories so I would review your relationships with them.

The choice of burning your bridges by giving them a short notice is a personal one. I perfectly understand your dilemma.
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Old 02-12-2021, 07:33 PM   #74
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Iíve departed retirement eligible from two companies. The first had a security policy that locked you out of systems on notice. That one was an April notice and July actual departure date. Vacation and other time along with negotiated departure date for retirement credit. Paid APR to Jul. offered to train replacements and support. Nope. Out of the building in APR. Departure dinner in May and Bye.

Last one was similar. March decision based on new hire in the C suite. Negotiated pay and departure of Aug. no work after March.

You may find a similar situation. You should ask about whether policy will even allow you to work beyond notice.
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Old 02-12-2021, 08:56 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by ATX78701 View Post
, then payroll cuts off when that vacation commence and you just get paid the vacation time - so my plan to use PTO the final two weeks wouldnít have worked.
Vacation and PTO are legally quite different.
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Old 02-12-2021, 11:34 PM   #76
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I've mentioned early retirement to my boss multiple times over the past few years, most recently a month ago when corporate HR killed our PTO program.
Did they let you go home at night, at least?

No PTO would make me gone in no time flat.
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Old 02-13-2021, 12:01 AM   #77
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My advice is to wait until the very last minute and even then only if you have your retirement in the bag. Sadly, many employers will try and screw you out of your pension if you give them a chance. Personally, I waited until the very last possible moment and don't regret it. Sadly, I was the manager of a large government research group (24 people) and my "boss" (Division Director) fired every last one of them after I retired as my personal replacement choice was replaced by a thug who had the obvious duty to destroy my laboratory and eliminate it entirely. Apparently, this was revenge for my being independent and not a sycophantic underling.

As an example in research when you publish your research there is an important hierarchy of authorship with the first author being the main researcher and the last author the leader of the research group. No one not actually part of the research should be included if they didn't contribute to the research itself. This is a main ethical rule we researchers live by. However, it is also imperative to a research scientist to have as many publications as possible as a measurement of your success. This is especially true for first and last authorship positions which translate to getting better positions usually as a professor in a University research laboratory (after leaving government service). Anyway, this "boss" made it a rule that he must be the last author on all research papers even though he had nothing whatsoever to do with the actual research other than being the administrator. It is highly unethical and outrageous to order that and I refused. That authorship position was mine to have as I got the funding, designed and supervised the projects, and directed the research often also being a leading research scientist myself. Of course, being the administrator of our Division, all publications have to be approved by him so he could choke off all my (and my staff's) publications which is exactly what he did. He was later court-martialed (he was a colonel in the Army) for numerous (embezzlement and bribery plus sexual and racial harassment) crimes and I later published everything after retirement and his elimination from the Army (he was retired at one grade lower).
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Old 02-13-2021, 02:17 AM   #78
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Not sure I saw a decision from MedVed on this.
As someone said earlier, everyone is different. A lot depends on the profession, your personal outlook and expectations. Mine are low, & although our company do work to help some amazing things happen around the globe & across many industries, I also realise it will still carry on long after Iím gone. I focus more on family, friendships and friends within work - they are the key things I will miss.

My boss is a good friend with a similar cynicism of our MegaCorp. He has known for quite some time about my vague plans (I expect him to follow within 6 months!). MegaCorp has actually been very very good to/for me over more than 20 years, but I am aware cultures change, and have no expectations.

I also shared my plan a few months ago with my immediate team. We all share some top banter, and I felt they deserved to know. I also appreciate that was Ďa riskí to it spreading wider, but as I told them, ďuntil I hand my notice in, this could all be my joke just to wind you lot up, so donít share wider, I will just deny itĒ

That said, I formally gave only the required notice (3 months) to HR. In our industry we regularly have RIFs, and should the opportunity have arisen, I believe my boss would have looked to see if any window for a severance package could have opened. Sadly (), our team are too valued and rarely Ďbenefití from being at the end of a redundancy, so that was never to be.

Notice was handed in a week ago, and it is refreshing how it feels like a weight lifting! When I hear of delays or challenges to our future products, I am no longer so vested, and feel the blood pressure lowering already!
Iím taking the opportunity as people call me for things to pick and choose who to let know.....my boss asked me if I wanted him to send out a message, I suggested leaving it until a month before I leave, but that is up to him.

Technically I put this off a year due to COVID, and of course the markets have behaved very well since last yearís brief mini-crash....Iím hoping that covers the sequencing risk (a crash early in retirement), although I am aware markets are still.....frothy.
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Old 02-13-2021, 11:10 AM   #79
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Generally a bad decision in my opinion.

You need to understand that if the shoe were on the other foot, employer would give you the minimum notice possible - could even be a Friday pink slip telling you not to come to work on Monday. Nearly all employment these days is "free will", which means employee can quit/resign/retire at any time for any reason or no reason at all, and employer can terminate at any time for any reason or no reason at all.

Also realize that no employee is irreplaceable. We all love to think that we have very specialized knowledge, are top performers, and employer would be in a terrible bind if we resigned with minimal notice. Get over that line of thinking immediately. We all are very good at what we do. Likewise, there are others who could fill our shoes. Maybe not immediately, but over time, and employer would roll with it and do just fine.

So, if you're truly concerned about employers well-being, give 30 days or less (I'd suggest no more than 2 weeks), offer to document what you do and are doing so your replacement has something to work from and get up to speed. Giving more than 30 days serves no good purpose, other than making yourself feel good. Between 30 days and 6 months, there's potential for employer to make your life difficult...they could throw extra work at you, expect more of you, or even terminate you to avoid paying you for another 6 months.

Be sure that you are sure of what you do and the reason for doing it. Again, if the shoe were on the other foot, employer would not do the same for you.
I just gave 10 weeks notice and received an extra "special project" for my trouble. I should have given 30 days. Oh well.
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Old 02-13-2021, 12:29 PM   #80
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I took a package offered to encourage older employees to leave. I was well-respected in a critical role and shocked my team by taking the package. The package terms gave me a choice of, as I recall, 2 months or 5 months notice. Being the nice guy I am/was, I took the 5 month notice to give the company the best transition.

Mistake. I should have taken the shortest possible term. Within one month I had my projects transitioned to other people. Except for one particularly annoying assignment, I had very little responsibility for the remaining 4 months. Nobody I transitioned my main work to ever consulted with me during that time, so I endured the worst of my assignments for those final months without having any of the fun work. I was so happy when it finally ended.
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