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Old 02-03-2021, 10:52 AM   #61
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I've fallen from ladders 3 times in the past 2 years. Nothing serious, but I seem to be developing some balance issues. That's why I got gutter guards and have someone wash the windows, and I'm going to hire a painter to stain the soffit and fascia.
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Old 02-03-2021, 11:17 AM   #62
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I've had enough over-use injuries and heard enough stories to make me increasingly careful as I age. For moderate to heavy lifting I'd spread the work out over a few days, preferably lifting once every few days like a resistance exercise, and getting in better shape before beginning. I'll have to do that when I do the kitchen flooring. Linoleum is glued to asbestos tile with black mastic that may also contain asbestos, and the edges have been curled up from day one. I have to weight down the edges with 30 lb. bricks for a few hours, then replace the base molding with thicker molding that will hold down the linoleum before it curls up again (I already confirmed it stays flat for a few hours.) I'm not going to pay for asbestos abatement or convince a flooring guy he should do this. A handyman might be willing but I feel like I can safely handle 30 lb. bricks if I get in shape and pace myself.
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Old 02-03-2021, 11:19 AM   #63
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The foam things or very fine mesh work well in some regions of the country, and not so well in others.

Count the southeast as a difficult area. We have a lot of trees. I mean, a lot. We're going on a good 10 year run now of plentiful rain too, which leads to nice growth spurts. This spring promises to be another full bloom spring.

Blooms you say? Yes. Until you have lived pollen season in the southeast, you cannot believe it. Late March here means visible pollen fog. This stuff clogs all small screens and sponges. It creates a kind of mortar too, which help bind all the stuff together. And then there are pine needles...

I'd say they are a good idea in places with large leaf deciduous trees where you don't see the pollen create etch-a-sketch ready layers on car windows.
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Old 02-03-2021, 11:43 AM   #64
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And then there are pine needles...
+1

Now throw in those damn maple tree seed pods (aka whirlybirds/tree helicopters). They tend to get stuck sticking out of the mesh gutter guards.

Here's a picture -

https://wkdq.com/what-tree-do-helicopters-come-from/
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Old 02-03-2021, 12:02 PM   #65
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I've tried using my blower to blow out the leaves, but it doesn't do a very good job because the stuff at the bottom of the gutters is wet, and doesn't blow out well. Just this year I tried using my power washer, but I've got an old one that doesn't have a curved nozzle attachment that wold clean out the gutters, so I had to go up on the ladder anyway. Might be time to get a new power washer!
There’s nothing like a good excuse to get new equipment. I would expect some yankee engineering would get you where you need to be with either the blower or the power washer. I can see a power washer with a pole and the right nozzle doing the job, but I have a pretty hefty backpack leaf blower that I think I could get to handle those wet leaves. Either way, I think it can be done pretty easy and with keeping the feet on the ground.
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Old 02-03-2021, 01:00 PM   #66
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+1

Now throw in those damn maple tree seed pods (aka whirlybirds/tree helicopters). They tend to get stuck sticking out of the mesh gutter guards.

Here's a picture -

https://wkdq.com/what-tree-do-helicopters-come-from/
I'll raise you another +1!

So basically, mesh/sponge covers work for the traditional round lobed white oak. Acorns roll right off, leaves have few catches. Black oaks, pin oaks, and willow oaks need not apply.
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Old 02-03-2021, 04:17 PM   #67
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I'm 61 and in the same mindset. I designed and built our house and do just about everything on it still.
I hate to think of the point that someday I won't be able to. We do not want to move and I only hope to go out of here feet first horizontally.
I don't like the work most contractor do even if you can get them to show up.
This is how I feel about it. There are some things I can't do. Certain types of carpentry, etc. And finding someone who is willing to fix something instead of replace it is a problem. And getting 4 estimates, all wildly different, for same job and materials. One guy wants $500, another guy wants $2,000. Exhausting just trying to find the 'right' guy to use.
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Old 02-03-2021, 04:38 PM   #68
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Yes, I understand that. It's valid to point out the other maintenance but what I never hear is a cost comparison to hiring all of that stuff out for your own house vs. paying for it thru HOA dues, if the main issue is to avoid doing that maintenance yourself.

If a community has amenities you want that's a different factor. But if I don't like going to pools, the cost to maintain one with HOA dues is an extra I'd rather not be paying.
We have about 60 units in our development & use a local (not national, learned our lesson) property manager with over 30 years experience & multiple local clients.

So I'm skeptical a random resident here could find a licensed, bonded (we check both to make sure they're current) contractor for whatever (e.g. roofing, paving, electrical) at a lower cost.
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Old 02-04-2021, 09:00 AM   #69
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The foam things or very fine mesh work well in some regions of the country, and not so well in others.

Count the southeast as a difficult area. We have a lot of trees. I mean, a lot. We're going on a good 10 year run now of plentiful rain too, which leads to nice growth spurts. This spring promises to be another full bloom spring.

Blooms you say? Yes. Until you have lived pollen season in the southeast, you cannot believe it. Late March here means visible pollen fog. This stuff clogs all small screens and sponges. It creates a kind of mortar too, which help bind all the stuff together. And then there are pine needles...

I'd say they are a good idea in places with large leaf deciduous trees where you don't see the pollen create etch-a-sketch ready layers on car windows.
LOL I'm right there with you Joe. The "yellowfog sneezy season" really sucks here in Ga. I hired a guy to clean my gutters for the 1st time this past fall. He did it with a pressure washer mounted on a double axle trailer with a big water tank. He took about 1&1/2 hours and never left the ground. His wand was equipt with a double nozzle on the end and had a lot more power than my pressure washer could generate. I was impressed and will be calling him again next fall to do my entire house,roof and gutters. He did my DD's house and roof last summer using hot water and some soap that did great on hers. I have an extension that I can use to do the pressure washing of my siding ans well as the driveway with the circular "pressure broom" that does good.
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Old 02-04-2021, 09:32 AM   #70
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This is how I feel about it. There are some things I can't do. Certain types of carpentry, etc. And finding someone who is willing to fix something instead of replace it is a problem. And getting 4 estimates, all wildly different, for same job and materials. One guy wants $500, another guy wants $2,000. Exhausting just trying to find the 'right' guy to use.

And then to get them to show up when they say they will is another battle. No to to mention the fact that I can do most jobs for 1/3 the price or less.
Even when working full time as an Engineer it bothered me to be paying somebody 2x per hour or more what I was making. But then again I am frugal.
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Old 02-04-2021, 09:39 AM   #71
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And then to get them to show up when they say they will is another battle. No to to mention the fact that I can do most jobs for 1/3 the price or less.
Even when working full time as an Engineer it bothered me to be paying somebody 2x per hour or more what I was making. But then again I am frugal.
When I was 22 and in my first house a water pipe behind a wall in the bathroom developed a leak and it cost $160 for a plumber to fix it. It took him an hour and a half. After paying the bills for the month I was left with about $150 of disposable income so that one small job cost me an entire month of fun money. That was the exact moment that I became very interested in DIY.
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Old 02-04-2021, 09:56 AM   #72
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I think I'd be very frustrated by having to hire out most repair work, rather than the small fraction that I can't do
That is something I do worry about as I get older. I'm a big Do-It-Yourself'er. It saves money, is faster, and I really enjoy it. There are very few things I can't do myself. But even at 57 I can tell things are getting harder than they used to be. I'll keep doing what I can as long as I can, but at some point I imagine I will reach my limits. That will be a very sad day indeed. Not only will I have price sticker shock having to pay someone else, but I'll be giving up a big part of who I am. I'm sure I'll also be a perfectionist, frustrated with hired help that doesn't put as much time and effort into a project as I would. I'm very detail oriented, hired help tends to get in and out as quickly as possible.

In the case of my in-laws, they just have their son-in-law do everything for free. We've spent the last 15+ years remodeling their old house, installing new plumbing and electrical, painting, doing routine maintenance, yard work, etc. Sadly, it's not looking like my daughter will be getting married anytime soon, so no son-in-law (free handyman) in the picture. Despite her upbringing, she's not a big DIY person, so I don't think she'll help much beyond maybe mowing the yard.
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Old 02-04-2021, 10:06 AM   #73
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I tested this similar but different one and then installed them on my rental that I had to clean every year. After I installed them, the next year, there was nothing to clean.

https://www.menards.com/main/buildin...3809628&ipos=6

The IMPORTANT thing is to get the ones that have screen over the holes, as the company also sells them without the screen.

They are cheap at $0.65/ft and work amazingly well. Also easy to remove/replace if you need to do any work.

This property is in a cold region that gets a lot of snow, so they hold up well to snow issues.
I've actually put these on both houses, years ago, and they've worked reasonably well...but...they were almost impossible (and in some places impossible) to slide under the steep angle of our metal roof, and I finally had to cut out parts where it intersected the metal gutter support. Some of them didn't stay on at my dad's house, and I finally took them off years later and now have to clean gutters again...sigh...they are for now staying on pretty well at our hopes, but the lip where I had to cut out the place for the gutter support catches leaves a lot.
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Old 02-04-2021, 10:08 AM   #74
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When I was 22 and in my first house a water pipe behind a wall in the bathroom developed a leak and it cost $160 for a plumber to fix it. It took him an hour and a half. After paying the bills for the month I was left with about $150 of disposable income so that one small job cost me an entire month of fun money. That was the exact moment that I became very interested in DIY.

I have 5 brothers and sisters and I am by far the most DIY type. Don't know where that came from but I enjoy solving problems and saving money
That is why I designed and built (80-90% of it) our house myself. I built the entire house (1947sq ft) for $100,000 (exclusive of the land and site work cost) and it is of a much higher grade than a standard builders spec house.
It also is a traditional Timberframe which tends to cost more to build as well.
I have always liked the aesthetic of timberframes and used to look at magazines like "Timber Homes Illustrated" with awe and envy. They gave me a lot of inspiration. They almost became "house porn" for me.
Look at this site for one of the most famous of the style. He literally wrote the book(or two) on timber framing.
Look at some of the "shacks" in this gallery.
Mine is nothing like these but you would have to add another zero to my cost and then some to get these.
https://bensonwood.com/portfolio/cove-house/
https://bensonwood.com/portfolio/
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Old 02-04-2021, 10:11 AM   #75
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That is something I do worry about as I get older. I'm a big Do-It-Yourself'er. It saves money, is faster, and I really enjoy it. There are very few things I can't do myself. But even at 57 I can tell things are getting harder than they used to be. I'll keep doing what I can as long as I can, but at some point I imagine I will reach my limits. That will be a very sad day indeed. Not only will I have price sticker shock having to pay someone else, but I'll be giving up a big part of who I am. I'm sure I'll also be a perfectionist, frustrated with hired help that doesn't put as much time and effort into a project as I would. I'm very detail oriented, hired help tends to get in and out as quickly as possible.

You sound exactly like me except I am 61.
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Old 02-04-2021, 10:15 AM   #76
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That is something I do worry about as I get older. I'm a big Do-It-Yourself'er. It saves money, is faster, and I really enjoy it. There are very few things I can't do myself. But even at 57 I can tell things are getting harder than they used to be. I'll keep doing what I can as long as I can, but at some point I imagine I will reach my limits. That will be a very sad day indeed. Not only will I have price sticker shock having to pay someone else, but I'll be giving up a big part of who I am. I'm sure I'll also be a perfectionist, frustrated with hired help that doesn't put as much time and effort into a project as I would. I'm very detail oriented, hired help tends to get in and out as quickly as possible.
Except that I'm 66, this is exactly how I feel about it! I draw the line at electrical - I won't touch anything electrical beyond rewiring a lamp, and also we hire out anything to do with the well and septic system except for "grunt work" such as digging out the dirt for the leach lines. But the time is coming...sigh...
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Old 02-04-2021, 10:22 AM   #77
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I have 5 brothers and sisters and I am by far the most DIY type. Don't know where that came from but I enjoy solving problems and saving money
That is why I designed and built (80-90% of it) our house myself. I built the entire house (1947sq ft) for $100,000 (exclusive of the land and site work cost) and it is of a much higher grade than a standard builders spec house.
It also is a traditional Timberframe which tends to cost more to build as well.
I have always liked the aesthetic of timberframes and used to look at magazines like "Timber Homes Illustrated" with awe and envy. They gave me a lot of inspiration. They almost became "house porn" for me.
Look at this site for one of the most famous of the style. He literally wrote the book(or two) on timber framing.
Look at some of the "shacks" in this gallery.
Mine is nothing like these but you would have to add another zero to my cost and then some to get these.
https://bensonwood.com/portfolio/cove-house/
https://bensonwood.com/portfolio/
I bought land in 1995 and was going to build a house and had planned on doing 80% - 90% of the work myself. The lot was next door to my brother...in fact he was the one that told me the lot was available before it went on the market, knowing that if I bought it he didn't have to worry about an unknown wacky neighbor.

Then a couple months after I bought it he told me that their dream house they had always liked was up for sale and they were moving. So I bought his house instead of building. Since then I've extensively renovated it, basically down to the studs and rebuilt new.
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Old 02-04-2021, 10:24 AM   #78
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I bought land in 1995 and was going to build a house and had planned on doing 80% - 90% of the work myself. The lot was next door to my brother...in fact he was the one that told me the lot was available before it went on the market, knowing that if I bought it he didn't have to worry about an unknown neighbor.

Then a couple months after I bought it he told me that their dream house they had always liked was up for sale and they were moving. So I bought his house instead of building. Since then I've extensively renovated it, basically down to the studs and rebuilt new.

That makes sense. Sounds like you've pretty much rebuilt the entire thing anyway.
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Old 02-04-2021, 10:26 AM   #79
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That is something I do worry about as I get older. I'm a big Do-It-Yourself'er. It saves money, is faster, and I really enjoy it. There are very few things I can't do myself. But even at 57 I can tell things are getting harder than they used to be. I'll keep doing what I can as long as I can, but at some point I imagine I will reach my limits. That will be a very sad day indeed. Not only will I have price sticker shock having to pay someone else, but I'll be giving up a big part of who I am. I'm sure I'll also be a perfectionist, frustrated with hired help that doesn't put as much time and effort into a project as I would. I'm very detail oriented, hired help tends to get in and out as quickly as possible.
I could have written this myself. I agree with everything, right down to the age.

I also do this kind of work on a volunteer basis. The current surge has put that on hold and it is killing me. My group and I just made a plan to go forward with a project in March, with the hope of the surge continuing to dwindle. I've also discussed doing this kind of work for pay, but decided against it due to liability risk.
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Old 02-04-2021, 11:59 AM   #80
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That is something I do worry about as I get older. I'm a big Do-It-Yourself'er. It saves money, is faster, and I really enjoy it. There are very few things I can't do myself. But even at 57 I can tell things are getting harder than they used to be. I'll keep doing what I can as long as I can, but at some point I imagine I will reach my limits. That will be a very sad day indeed. Not only will I have price sticker shock having to pay someone else, but I'll be giving up a big part of who I am. I'm sure I'll also be a perfectionist, frustrated with hired help that doesn't put as much time and effort into a project as I would. I'm very detail oriented, hired help tends to get in and out as quickly as possible.
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I could have written this myself. I agree with everything, right down to the age.
Same same!

I have witnessed this first-hand, and have a deep concern. My father was a big DIY guy, could do just about anything (and so we did). He also took care of all the maintenance for the homes of my 3 sisters.

Well, the problem is that, as he aged, he still planned on doing the maintenance. But he slowed down to a crawl on actually doing it. So lots of things needed attention. (Living 900 miles away, I could not help regularly.) Moreover, his standard of work declined. But he was adamant about not hiring things out, to the point of arrogance sometimes.

After he passed, we had to pay a lot of pros to clean up the deferred maintenance and shoddy workmanship to be able to sell the house.

So I want to be clear-eyed about what I can and cannot do as the years pass. I am trying to "test-drive" hiring some things out. I decided this summer that I probably could not do as good a job with landscaping and hardscaping as a pro could, so I "blew that dough" to the tune of $12k. This was a really good move. Nonetheless, I have a list of house renovations/repairs that I am going to tackle this summer, after I retire!
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