Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-03-2020, 02:06 PM   #61
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
MuirWannabe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1,598
Time for black eyed peas again. Its another sleepy, dusty, delta day.
__________________
Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt. John Muir
MuirWannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-03-2020, 03:50 PM   #62
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,294
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuirWannabe View Post
Time for black eyed peas again. Its another sleepy, dusty, delta day.
Wow. Thanks for the reminder - I can't believe this slipped by me till now (see my earlier posts about my obsession with this song).

A true classic, timeless. Well, look at this line:

"There was a virus going 'round; papa caught it, and he died last spring"

"Fil" did an analysis of this song/performance in the mean time. No mention of black eyed peas in the analysis though:



-ERD50
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2020, 04:33 PM   #63
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
MuirWannabe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1,598
You are obsessed. But she is a looker. And the song is timeless as you say.

I thought about that virus line, but doubt it was Covid related .

Besides being a great story with just enough details to drive you crazy, her voice is so smoky. I think thats a big part of the secret sauce on this.
__________________
Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt. John Muir
MuirWannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2020, 08:21 PM   #64
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,696
Funny, the song came on today in the truck, and for the millionth time I wondered what was thrown off the bridge.

I also noted some of the inconsistencies mentioned last year in this post, which I'd either forgotten or missed the first time around. I, too, always assumed it was an aborted fetus they threw off the bridge.

My new observation today was around the term "dinner." It means "lunch" in the South, but "supper" in many Northern US regions. At first, it's obviously lunch, since they came in from the morning work in the fields, and Momma had been cooking all morning. But later, that nice young preacher is coming over for dinner Sunday night.

Still a great song. Just like Joan Baez' The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, in which she butchered the lyrics (e.g.; "so much" cavalry instead of "Stoneman's".) And how could the wife say "there goes Robert E. Lee"? Or was it "the Robert E. Lee"? But that doesn't really work, either. Gotta love a song with some mystery!
CaptTom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2020, 08:32 PM   #65
Moderator Emeritus
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 45,110
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptTom View Post
My new observation today was around the term "dinner." It means "lunch" in the South, but "supper" in many Northern US regions. At first, it's obviously lunch, since they came in from the morning work in the fields, and Momma had been cooking all morning. But later, that nice young preacher is coming over for dinner Sunday night.
Just to add some confusion, my mother always told me that dinner was the larger meal of the day, whether that was at noon or in the evening. The other meal was lunch or supper.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptTom View Post
Still a great song. Just like Joan Baez' The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, in which she butchered the lyrics (e.g.; "so much" cavalry instead of "Stoneman's".) And how could the wife say "there goes Robert E. Lee"? Or was it "the Robert E. Lee"? But that doesn't really work, either. Gotta love a song with some mystery!
The Robert E. Lee was a steamboat, built in 1866. So maybe that was it.

According to Wikipedia,
Quote:
The Baez recording had some changes in the lyrics.[14] Baez later told Rolling Stone's Kurt Loder that she initially learned the song by listening to the recording on the Band's album, and had never seen the printed lyrics at the time she recorded it, and thus sang the lyrics as she had (mis)heard them. In more recent years in her concerts, Baez has performed the song as originally written by Robertson.[15]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ni...Old_Dixie_Down
__________________
Happily retired since 2009, at age 61.
W2R is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2020, 06:18 AM   #66
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,696
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
Just to add some confusion, my mother always told me that dinner was the larger meal of the day, whether that was at noon or in the evening. The other meal was lunch or supper.
I assumed that was it, but it still struck me that the two were seen talking "after church last Sunday night." But the preacher was invited to "dinner" on Sunday. Just how long is this church service? Around here Sunday services usually break up around lunch ("Sunday dinner") time, which makes sense. Not at night (supper time.) That's the line which doesn't fit. Of course, "Sunday afternoon" wouldn't rhyme with "don't seem right."

Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
I'd seen that suggestion, but somewhere I read that it didn't work, because either the time frame or location of the steamboat vs. the song didn't fit. Can't find the reference now.

However, even the Wikipedia article you linked has the following citation:

Quote:
14. The Last Waltz of The Band Neil Minturn - 2005- Page 85 "be more familiar to some in Joan Baez's version. Hoskyns remarks of Baez's version: "Two years later, Joan Baez recorded a terrible version of 'Dixie' that seemed to turn Robert E. Lee into a steamboat, but it made"
Anyway, both are great songs, from two of the best vocalists who ever lived.
CaptTom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2020, 06:36 AM   #67
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: The Great Wide Open
Posts: 2,765
^^
Many churches have another church service on Sunday evenings well after the Sunday morning service. DMIL's church did that and also had a Wednesday evening service, and yes, it was well below the Mason Dixon line.
__________________
Give me Liberty or give me Death. Patrick Henry
Winemaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2020, 07:02 AM   #68
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 29,878
Sunday dinner was a large meal at midday after church.

Dinner was an evening meal the other nights of the week as that was the larger meal of the day, and we had lunch at midday those days.

Supper was an evening meal, lighter as opposed to dinner. I guess we had supper on Sunday evenings.
__________________
Retired since summer 1999.
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2020, 01:10 PM   #69
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,696
OK, Let's just stipulate that "she" (the narrator) went to the late service last Sunday, but that the young preacher is coming over for the mid-day meal after the early service this coming Sunday. This way, we've preserved the integrity of the lyrics AND it still rhymes.

I think I've spent way too much time on this already. But I still like the song.
CaptTom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2020, 02:01 PM   #70
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: The Great Wide Open
Posts: 2,765
^^Sure beats talking about the lack of toilet paper, the high price of meat and wearing a mask,though.
__________________
Give me Liberty or give me Death. Patrick Henry
Winemaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2020, 07:19 AM   #71
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,696
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winemaker View Post
^^Sure beats talking about the lack of toilet paper, the high price of meat and wearing a mask,though.
OK, then let's keep going...

Another historical song: Gordon Lightfoot's The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald. The lyrics put you right there in the midst of the tragedy.

I do take exception to the line "the captain wired in..." because, let's face it, there were no telegraph wires involved. And there's another option about the cause of the wreck which has been gaining traction lately, beyond what's in the lyrics. They may have simply misjudged their course and grounded on a charted reef. But like the other two, it's still a good song.
CaptTom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2020, 07:44 AM   #72
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
bclover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: philly
Posts: 1,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Car-Guy View Post
WHAT?


Maybe it's a southern thing, but everyone around here (well the natives anyway) eat black-eyed peas each New Years day. (For good luck)


Yep also an African American tradition (not surprising most have southern roots).

we never liked them but always, always had a pot on NY day.
__________________
My darling girl, when are you going to realize that being "normal" is not necessarily a virtue? it sometimes rather denotes a lack of courage~Aunt Francis
bclover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2020, 08:29 AM   #73
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,294
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptTom View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
The Robert E. Lee was a steamboat, built in 1866. So maybe that was it.
I'd seen that suggestion, but somewhere I read that it didn't work, because either the time frame or location of the steamboat vs. the song didn't fit. Can't find the reference now.

However, even the Wikipedia article you linked has the following citation:



Anyway, both are great songs, from two of the best vocalists who ever lived.
Oh boy, another song to feed my obsessions!

And it has a date ref too, " By May the tenth, Richmond had fell,". Richmond fell earlier, but I think this is a bit of poetic license, with Richmond representing the Confederacy, so it was the Confederacy that fell "by" May 10 (not "on" May 10)...

Lots more here: Peter Viney: The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Quote:
From the day Richmond had fell (Confederates abandoned the town on April 2 and Federals occupied it on the 3rd) up until May 10, the various organized Confederate forces continued to surrender. By May 10, most if not all had accepted their paroles.

Before I researched it, I always heard it (in the Band original) as "there goes the Robert E. Lee", and imagined the "Robert E. Lee" to be a train, the best train in the South? To me, that matched with " But they should never have taken the very best."


Quote:
To be fair to Baez, on some live versions Levon gets pretty close to adding a 'the'. Even as early as Rock of Ages it sounds like: There goes -a Robert E. Lee. The question of whether it's "the" Robert E. Lee (a steamboat, or even an army unit with that name) or the General himself has caused some discussion, ...
Quote:
… the fact that Robert E Lee was never in Tennessee after the war doesn't mean that people didn't think they saw him. People in the South after the war constantly thought they saw Lincoln and General Lee, even though they couldn't have, and it would be passed down to generations even though it was historically incorrect.
Even if it was ref to the steamboat, which was pointed out, could not be historically correct, I'm fine with some poetic license - it gets the point across w/o destroying anything, even if not factually correct. I don't see any harm in it.

I was familiar with, and liked, the Baez version before I ever heard the original. When I heard The Band do it, I was thinking, "Wow, they just drag this out, they slow wa-a-a-a-ay down and lag w-a-a-a-ay behind the beat as they enter the chorus. This is weird". But then, I listened a few more times, and realized how that added a real heft and weight (no pun intended) to the song. After that, I couldn't stand Baez's version, it seemed all sing-y-song-y and trivial.

and I still hear it as "so much Cavalry came", wasn't familiar with "Stoneman's cavalry".

The Band - they've really created some masterpieces of "Americana" (Acadian Driftwood and King Harvest being two of my favs).

edit- I should mark my calendar "It was the third of September ".... I still think "all he left us was a loan" is more clever and fitting than what appears to be the official (though that doesn't mean it is 'correct') version, "all he left us was alone". He was MIA as a Father, they were always "left alone", even before his death. Leaving them "a loan" would just be salt in the wound, adding to their misery, he messes them up even in death - far more poetic, IMO.

Oh well, we can pick this up in September...

-ERD50
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2020, 11:55 AM   #74
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: The Great Wide Open
Posts: 2,765
I looking forward to our discussion to our discussion of "American Pie".

I can't blame Baez for her misinterpretation of words in some of my favorite songs. I remember hearing "lunatic hound" when it was "blue tic hound" in Charlie Daniel's tune "Country Boy".
__________________
Give me Liberty or give me Death. Patrick Henry
Winemaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2020, 12:04 PM   #75
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 3,287
Ok yeah love the black eyes peas, that's good eatin'.

But what was the "news about Billy Joe"? Any locals provide color?

(I do recall what the news was as portrayed in movie of same name). No cheating.

Edited to say: oh..just a year too late. Must have missed this great thread the first time.
Montecfo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 03:35 PM   #76
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Koolau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Leeward Oahu
Posts: 6,100
Back to "chopping cotton" for a moment. Unless I missed it, I didn't see the "answer" I was presented IN a cotton field in AZ back in the '70s. My Megacorp had "business" with cotton growers and I led a small team of folks "simulating" chopping cotton. It was 'splained to me by our local station chief (plant pathologist or similar) that chopping cotton was the first pass through the freshly planted cotton, with a hoe and THINNING the cotton. Apparently, cotton is over planted and then thinned (at least in the old days - and thinned by hand.) My cursory search of the net seems to confirm this though some "experts" seem to think it was weeding.

Always loved the song. It took on a special meaning as I was a man "out standing" in my field (actually someone else's cotton field.) As I fumbled to complete my work in the early morning, the spray rigs had ice cycles hanging from them. My fingers were frozen and I could barely write by flashlight. By end of the day, it was in the mid '80s.

I learned that by "mounding" the rows of soil and planting cotton on the east side of the mound, a farmer could plant 3 weeks earlier because the plants would catch the early sun. Yeah, TMI but this discussion brought back a flood of memories (Confrontation with the Farm Workers Union, watching a fatal car accident, sun burns from hell, etc.)

Returning you now to your regularly scheduled discussion. Oh, and YMMV.
__________________
Ko'olau's Law -

Anything which can be used can be misused. Anything which can be misused will be.
Koolau is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 07:59 PM   #77
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,294
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koolau View Post
Back to "chopping cotton" for a moment. Unless I missed it, I didn't see the "answer" I was presented IN a cotton field in AZ back in the '70s. My Megacorp had "business" with cotton growers and I led a small team of folks "simulating" chopping cotton. It was 'splained to me by our local station chief (plant pathologist or similar) that chopping cotton was the first pass through the freshly planted cotton, with a hoe and THINNING the cotton. Apparently, cotton is over planted and then thinned (at least in the old days - and thinned by hand.) My cursory search of the net seems to confirm this though some "experts" seem to think it was weeding.

Always loved the song. It took on a special meaning as I was a man "out standing" in my field (actually someone else's cotton field.) As I fumbled to complete my work in the early morning, the spray rigs had ice cycles hanging from them. My fingers were frozen and I could barely write by flashlight. By end of the day, it was in the mid '80s.

I learned that by "mounding" the rows of soil and planting cotton on the east side of the mound, a farmer could plant 3 weeks earlier because the plants would catch the early sun. Yeah, TMI but this discussion brought back a flood of memories (Confrontation with the Farm Workers Union, watching a fatal car accident, sun burns from hell, etc.)

Returning you now to your regularly scheduled discussion. Oh, and YMMV.
Yes, I brought it up, but it was way back in post # 6:

Quote:
I lived on a farm when that song came out, and though we were up North here in IL, that line about 'chopping cotton' didn't sound right to me. Would cotton be ready for 'chopping' by the 3rd of June, even in the warm South? I figured it was some LA or New York song writer.

But my recent research showed that 'chopping cotton' meant weeding it, chopping at the weeds, not chopping down the cotton for harvest. OK, that makes more sense.
"Thinning" makes a lot of sense too, and since you have experience I'd take that over "weeding".

I wasn't familiar with the idea of planting on the side of the mound of dirt (the "hill") to capture more warmth from the early sun, though I know that is done on mountain sides. Interesting.

-ERD50
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bad news, bad news, good news.... ziggy29 Health and Early Retirement 17 04-04-2011 09:26 AM
Good News/Bad News RE: SS mickeyd FIRE and Money 38 08-05-2008 12:41 PM
Nords! - We have good news and bad news!............ Cut-Throat Life after FIRE 16 09-13-2006 01:26 PM
Good news/bad news kz Life after FIRE 16 09-06-2006 06:13 AM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:23 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.