Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-11-2017, 02:52 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Chuckanut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: West of the Mississippi
Posts: 11,222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon View Post
The saddle on that bike should be fairly comfy. For longer rides, padded bike shorts would be helpful. I use two different brands. Pearl Izumi are my favorite. I also have Sugoi. Not bad, but the padding feels a bit too 'bunchy' at times.
So these are shorts as in wearing shorts, not underwear.

I don't want to go out on the bike trail and embarrass myself!
__________________
The worst decisions are usually made in times of anger and impatience.
Chuckanut is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-11-2017, 02:53 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 4,033
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
Thanks for the advice.

What's a good brand of padded riding clothing? Should I get actual riding shorts, or can I get padded underwear to wear with my ordinary clothing?
They make padded liners if you want to wear baggy shorts over them. Some folks feel funny wearing tight shorts. I personally like cycling bibs, they don't fall down. Best advice is to try on the clothes and see what works. Tight fits, loose chaffs.

Most of the posters have covered what you need, but for me less is more. A bag with a tube, a multi tool, tire iron and a couple air cartridges is all you need. Don't get a pump. They are so hard to use, you'll end up hating it. The less weight on the bike, the more fun you'll have. Get good water bottles that don't leak and always carry a snack. I've been on many a ride that seems short, but a little extra energy makes the ride home easier.
COcheesehead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2017, 03:12 PM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
Avalon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
So these are shorts as in wearing shorts, not underwear.

I don't want to go out on the bike trail and embarrass myself!
Correct. These are typical bike shorts worn on the outside. They'll have padding not only on the back, but the padding will also wrap underneath, and to the front with what's generally called a modesty panel.
https://www.amazon.com/Pearl-iZUMi-Q.../dp/B002KT3XRQ

I often ride in cooler months with cargo shorts over my bike shorts. In winter, I'll wear sweat pants over the shorts.
I'm to the point that I don't actually need the padded shorts on shorter rides. ~ 40 miles and up is when I'm glad I have them.
And be advised, it's most likely going to take some time for your rear end to adjust to the feel of the saddle. It's part of the deal, so be patient.
__________________

...open up your mind and see like me...
Avalon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2017, 03:20 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
bjorn2bwild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Western US
Posts: 1,005
Quote:
Originally Posted by COcheesehead View Post
....... and always carry a snack. I've been on many a ride that seems short, but a little extra energy makes the ride home easier.
There's an app for that -


bjorn2bwild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2017, 07:04 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
nash031's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bonita (San Diego)
Posts: 1,769
One or two water bottle cages. A bike computer for speed, distance, etc. Commuter lights, front and rear. Spare tire bag to hold a tube, hand pump or CO2, and tire irons.

That's all you really need unless you're going to start toting cargo, then I'd just start with a backpack.
__________________
"So we beat to our own drummer in the sun;
We ask for nobody's permission to run.
I just wanna live in a world like that;
Now I'm gonna live in a world like that!" - World Like That, O.A.R.
nash031 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2017, 07:28 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 3,083
I did a 3-week bike tour in Greece years ago with a bicycle touring company. Their bikes were outfitted with handlebar bags.

I bought one for my bike upon my return home. Lightweight and capacious -- good place to store a jacket when not wearing it, carry a lunch, store a book/tablet if you plan to stop somewhere along the way for a bit, and a space for small purchases, etc.

Something like this...
https://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/s...46_-1___204793

-------

Also, a couple of bungees might come in handy at times.


omni
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 09:01 AM   #27
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by COcheesehead View Post
A bag with a tube, a multi tool, tire iron and a couple air cartridges is all you need. Don't get a pump. They are so hard to use, you'll end up hating it. The less weight on the bike, the more fun you'll have.
Just for giggles I grabbed a scale.

Two 12g (aka, the small ones) CO2 cartridges and a minimalist inflator head: 115g.
Lezyne pump w/ mount: 111g.

Early on I stranded myself after running through 2 cartridges on a particularly unlucky, ride. Fortunately another cyclist with a hand pump happened along and I made it home without another flat. I bought a hand pump.

But if you find hand pumps hard to use, use whatever is easier. A pump you can't use is about as useful as an empty cartridge! And as noted earlier a hand pump is a workout to get to 100psi, even with the small volume, road oriented, "high pressure" models. I don't run anything smaller than 32mm anymore, so I don't go that high.
orangehairfella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 09:10 AM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 4,033
Quote:
Originally Posted by orangehairfella View Post
Just for giggles I grabbed a scale.

Two 12g (aka, the small ones) CO2 cartridges and a minimalist inflator head: 115g.
Lezyne pump w/ mount: 111g.

Early on I stranded myself after running through 2 cartridges on a particularly unlucky, ride. Fortunately another cyclist with a hand pump happened along and I made it home without another flat. I bought a hand pump.

But if you find hand pumps hard to use, use whatever is easier. A pump you can't use is about as useful as an empty cartridge! And as noted earlier a hand pump is a workout to get to 100psi, even with the small volume, road oriented, "high pressure" models. I don't run anything smaller than 32mm anymore, so I don't go that high.
I always carry two cartridges and a Presta/Schrader adapter for air hose use. Never needed more than that with well over 60,000 miles of riding in the last 15-20 years. I have had at least 3 frame pumps over the years and never used them. Plus they look fugly on a bike frame. Your results may vary.
COcheesehead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 10:31 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fair Lawn
Posts: 1,974
REI's brand, Novara, is a good and reasonably priced bike short. BTW, you wear bike shorts commando.
mystang52 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 10:51 AM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Chuckanut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: West of the Mississippi
Posts: 11,222
Another thing I have discovered is that my old Yakima trunk bike rack sticks out a good 18 inches at least from the back of the car. This makes parking difficult in some areas with narrow streets and limited parking space sizes. Also, it has these rubber straps that one must pull tightly over some rubber buttons. Aging, arthritic hands have a tough time pulling it tight. And it takes up a lot of room in the trunk.

So...

Can anybody recommend a smaller trunk bike rack, one that hold only one or maybe two bikes? And one that does not strain the fingers to secure the bike onto the rack.
__________________
The worst decisions are usually made in times of anger and impatience.
Chuckanut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 11:07 AM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fair Lawn
Posts: 1,974
Can anybody recommend a smaller trunk bike rack, one that hold only one or maybe two bikes? And one that does not strain the fingers to secure the bike onto the rack.[/QUOTE]

I can't attest to it personally, but a friend I frequently bike with has a Saris Bones bike rack, and it appears to be easy to use.
Perhaps more than you want to do, but I invested in a hitch rack. It was something on the order of $550 all in - 150 for the hitch, 150 to pay my collision guy to install, and some 250 for the Saris Freedom hitch rack itself. For this rack, the bike tires fit in holders and there's a notched strap that is easy to use and no stress on the hands.
mystang52 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 11:08 AM   #32
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Dallas
Posts: 536
Coil locking cable (mounts under front of seat, out of the way)
Rear mount bag (small - medium expandable)
Air cartridge pump (fits in bag with backup tube; beats repairing on the road)
Rear and front lights
Helmet with rear-sight mirror (one of my best buys; just clips on the front visor)
Water bottle housing

That's what I have on the bike. I have a normal pump with gauge, good oil and a repair kit at home for basic stuff. Made a nifty bike rack to hang just below the garage track...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_20170306_205407.jpg (515.9 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20170306_205528.jpg (481.4 KB, 22 views)
Surewhitey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 01:03 PM   #33
Recycles dryer sheets
Avalon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
Another thing I have discovered is that my old Yakima trunk bike rack sticks out a good 18 inches at least from the back of the car. This makes parking difficult in some areas with narrow streets and limited parking space sizes. Also, it has these rubber straps that one must pull tightly over some rubber buttons. Aging, arthritic hands have a tough time pulling it tight. And it takes up a lot of room in the trunk.

So...

Can anybody recommend a smaller trunk bike rack, one that hold only one or maybe two bikes? And one that does not strain the fingers to secure the bike onto the rack.
No personal experience with racks. I've seen many variations, depending on type of vehicle, etc.

Have a look at this site. I see they even offer a solo rack.
https://www.saris.com/catalog/racks#
__________________

...open up your mind and see like me...
Avalon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 03:55 PM   #34
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon View Post
No personal experience with racks. I've seen many variations, depending on type of vehicle, etc.

Have a look at this site. I see they even offer a solo rack.
https://www.saris.com/catalog/racks#
I am a big Saris fan. They serve on bicycle boards and help raise money for the industry. I have had two racks and they are well made. That would be the first place I would look.
davef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 04:04 PM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 898
As part of my volunteer efforts, I try to make bicycling better in my community. I developed an advocacy web page for our local bike club. If you are not familiar with many of the approaches to make bicycling safer and more fun, you may want to review this link. Perhaps you want to join the National Bike Challenge (a fun program you can do with friends or by yourself) or participate in Bike Month activities presented by local organizations, typically. Does your community have a Ride of Silence which remembers cyclists who have been in accidents or killed; an important way to build awareness. The League of American Bicyclists certify towns as being Bicycle Friendly Communities as well as businesses. Is your town working on a BFC recognition. Are you familiar with your local bike advocacy efforts. And lots more. Advocacy - Hat City Cyclists
davef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2017, 01:12 PM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
GravitySucks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Syracuse
Posts: 2,744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
Thanks for the advice.

What's a good brand of padded riding clothing? Should I get actual riding shorts, or can I get padded underwear to wear with my ordinary clothing?


I like Pearl Izumi or Voler for bike shorts when riding the road bike and padded underwear from Dick's when riding the commuter more than 10 miles but less than 30 miles.

You may have to try different bike shorts as it seems to be a personal choice. One brand I hated my friend swears by, but he doesn't care for the fit of the Voler.
__________________
“No, not rich. I am a poor man with money, which is not the same thing"
GravitySucks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2017, 01:20 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 4,033
Quote:
Originally Posted by GravitySucks View Post
I like Pearl Izumi or Voler for bike shorts when riding the road bike and padded underwear from Dick's when riding the commuter more than 10 miles but less than 30 miles.

You may have to try different bike shorts as it seems to be a personal choice. One brand I hated my friend swears by, but he doesn't care for the fit of the Voler.
There are also different models with each brand varying from junk to excellent. So try the different price points too within a brand.
COcheesehead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2017, 01:27 PM   #38
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Marita40's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: St. Paul
Posts: 1,447
Here's what I have: two pair of bike shorts and a variety of tops. Several pair of well padded bike gloves. Several water bottles and a water bottle holder on bike. Under seat caddy (straps on with velcro) to hold coiled bike lock, multi-purpose tool, spare tire, rag. Pump, helmet, fanny pack, small coin purse that holds ID, credit card, money, extra house key and lock key.
Just got the bike out today for the season! I have a Raleigh road bike that is at least 20 years old and still going strong.
Marita40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2017, 02:06 PM   #39
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 16,007
I love it, I hope to get my bike out for the first time this year tomorrow!

Wow, great lists but what you need depends on where/how far you'll be riding. Some of the above lists might be overkill, or might not. I wouldn't skimp on anything, especially safety related items. You don't have to buy the best, but don't buy the cheapest.

Every rider needs
  • Helmet with rear view mirror (unless you prefer bar end models, I don't)
  • Water bottle(s) and cage(s)
  • Floor pump
  • Small saddle pack for keys, phone, etc.
Not essential but I can't imagine not having
  • Bike computer for speed, distance, etc.
If you're going to ride longer distances, mostly out and back from home
  • Multi-tool
  • Hand pump
  • Spare tubes
  • Tire levers
  • Saddle pack that fits the above plus incidentals
  • GPS (smartphone if you get reception everywhere you'll be riding)?
Optional, left at home maybe
  • Glueless patches
  • Vulcanizing patches
  • Chain lube
If you're going to leave the bike somewhere unattended
  • A good lock
If you're going to ride at night
  • Front and rear lights
I have several brands of bike shorts, my Pearl Izumi's are the best I've ever had.
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 40% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 25% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2017, 05:56 PM   #40
Dryer sheet aficionado
GreatLaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 33
Wow, some great information and ideas here!

This is not an accessory, but a precaution I learned to take.

I always kept my keys and ID on my person, either in a pocket or else keys and a small laminated/waterproof ID tag on a lanyard around my neck if cycling in clothes without suitable pockets. And for long rides in hot/sweaty or possibly rainy weather keep the ID in a waterproof zip-closure bag.

In case of a crash or accident you could go one way in an ambulance and your bike goes another way in a cop car trunk. Not a pleasant thought, and I never had a problem but better safe than sorry.
__________________
The first principle in speculating is never give anyone advice to buy or sell shares, because, where perspicacity is weakened, the most benevolent advice can turn out badly.
Joseph de la Vega
GreatLaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bike accessories


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ipad accessories Chuckanut Other topics 5 08-02-2012 08:03 PM
Life Insurance - necessary or necessary evil? Rich_by_the_Bay FIRE and Money 64 03-10-2006 12:08 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:44 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.