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Old 07-02-2019, 08:47 AM   #21
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Don't forget the insurance...I'm paying ~$1100/year for my student pilot, $1 million liability/$100,000 airframe coverage.

Your home/auto/umbrella provide no coverage for aircraft operation.
That sounds high.Check with AOPA or Avemco
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Old 07-02-2019, 09:06 AM   #22
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That sounds high.Check with AOPA or Avemco
When I shopped Avemco their quote was quite high. I went to my local agent and she has gotten me good rates with AIG.

As a retiree flying for fun and owning a plane, things are a bit different. My coverage is liability (about like ncbill's limits) and $30k for hull insurance on my little plane. The premium for the liability portion is about $450 annually, the premium for the hull coverage is about $1200 annually. I'm going to drop the hull coverage next year, I should self-insure for that. First, Ithink it vastly overstates the risk of big expenses. Second, if I do crumple the little plane into a ball, I'd either dig deep into my pocket, or give up the hobby. It's not like having the house burn down. But, I can't forego the liability coverage-- my exposure is too high and, anyway, my airport requires it for anyone based there.
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Old 07-02-2019, 09:19 AM   #23
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Sorry, I did not realize you owned a plane. That puts a whole different light on things. I rent, so all I need is renter's insurance
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Old 07-02-2019, 09:33 AM   #24
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Don't forget the insurance...I'm paying ~$1100/year for my student pilot, $1 million liability/$100,000 airframe coverage.

Your home/auto/umbrella provide no coverage for aircraft operation.
Good point. Insurance is not required by law, but FBO’s generally require it of renters and lenders generally require it on loans for aircraft purchases. My instructor pointed put that none of the aircraft I’d be renting had a hull value above $50,000 so no point wasting money on coverage above that.
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Old 07-04-2019, 08:42 PM   #25
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Ok pilots, this thread has regenerated my interest in restarting flying in some way. I actually found my PP license (from 1979, last flew in 1980) and logbook. Set up an online account at FAA Airmen Services and updated my address (a bit overdue ). Researched flight schools near me, and have a dilemma. Looks like my best choices are a Part 141 Cessna Pilot Center an hour from home, or a school that specializes in Sport and Recreational pilot training an hour and a half away. The travel time isn't a big factor (I'm retired after all), but could get to be a pain. The bigger question is what would serve me better as I go along. Since I already have my license (though of course I need a LOT of refreshing), would I be better off sticking with the Cessnas I'm familiar with, or effectively "step down" to LSAs, which I could presumably fly with somewhat less regulation, though also more restrictions. Any thoughts about pros and cons I should consider?
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Old 07-04-2019, 08:56 PM   #26
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Congrats on starting up again. I also had a hiatus until I retired. Then I went back with a vengeance.
I would stick with the Cessnas, because the LSA license is very limited about what and where you can fly..It also imposes restrictions where you can fly without special instructor endorsements.
Also, just because it is a Part 141 school, you are net required to go through their curriculum, since you have a license. I just had to fly with an instructor until I was proficient again, then i was able to fly by myself.
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Old 07-04-2019, 08:58 PM   #27
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LSA restrictions aren't that bad...

- daytime VFR
- max t/o weight 1320-lbs
- 2 seats, 1 passenger
- need endorsements for class d, c, b operations
- limited to 10k msl or 2k agl
- min 3sm visibility

and some others many of which are the same as the PP.

you already have a PP. all you need is a medical, knock-the-rust off training and a flight review. if you have any med issues that would cause you to not pass or be deferred to special issuance then do not proceed with the med exam until you know you will pass. if you take the med, fail or are deferred to SI then you are grounded even for the SP.
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Old 07-04-2019, 09:27 PM   #28
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Ok pilots, this thread has regenerated my interest in restarting flying in some way. I actually found my PP license (from 1979, last flew in 1980) and logbook. Set up an online account at FAA Airmen Services and updated my address (a bit overdue ).
Yup, lots of ground study ahead of you. If you didnít already know, they changed the names of airspaces in 1993; e.g. Positive Control Areas are now Class A airspaces. Somewhere I have an old Cessna ground study manual from 1988 with the old names. Found this helpful link summarizing the changes (more than just the names changed): https://aviation.stackexchange.com/q...us-before-1993
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Old 07-12-2019, 08:29 PM   #29
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Thanks, all, for the advice and encouragement. I visited the sport pilot school this week, and liked the vibe and the cute little planes. Will be checking out the Cessna Pilot Center in the next week or so. I'm a little bit intimidated by the 3rd class medical -- I don't think I have any relevant medical issues (definitely none of the 15 absolute no-nos), but at 66 my medical history is extensive, so I hope there wouldn't be anything an AME would find troubling. But I'm assuming I wouldn't need the medical until I'm ready to solo -- am I right?
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Old 07-12-2019, 11:47 PM   #30
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if you have a valid driver’s license no medical id needed for the sport pilot certificate. if you go for the Private Pilot cert you will need the medical before you solo. caution...DO NOT attempt the medical until you know you will pass. if you take the exam and either flunk or go into the FAA black hole known as Special Issuance (deferred) you will be ineligible for the Sport cert until you are issued a medical certificate. many AME’s will give you a practice exam to see if any issues are there.
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Old 07-13-2019, 02:13 PM   #31
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many AME’s will give you a practice exam to see if any issues are there.
The OP may want to do this first if the goal is to get a private ticket instead of the sport license. That way you'll know what the options are and avoid the snare of getting involved in the black hole mentioned.
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Old 07-13-2019, 03:15 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Crabby Mike View Post
Ok pilots, this thread has regenerated my interest in restarting flying in some way. I actually found my PP license (from 1979, last flew in 1980) and logbook. Set up an online account at FAA Airmen Services and updated my address (a bit overdue ). Researched flight schools near me, and have a dilemma. Looks like my best choices are a Part 141 Cessna Pilot Center an hour from home, or a school that specializes in Sport and Recreational pilot training an hour and a half away. The travel time isn't a big factor (I'm retired after all), but could get to be a pain. The bigger question is what would serve me better as I go along. Since I already have my license (though of course I need a LOT of refreshing), would I be better off sticking with the Cessnas I'm familiar with, or effectively "step down" to LSAs, which I could presumably fly with somewhat less regulation, though also more restrictions. Any thoughts about pros and cons I should consider?
The part 141 will probably cost more than going part 61. The closest airport to you will most likely have couple -172 to rent and an old crusty CFI with 15,000 hours that won't charge you nearly as much as the 141 joint will.

I personally would get recurrent in what you know...trusty, reliable Cessna. Once you are current, then you can get checked out on some of the LSA planes that may be available to rent.
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Old 07-13-2019, 03:25 PM   #33
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The part 141 will probably cost more than going part 61. The closest airport to you will most likely have couple -172 to rent and an old crusty CFI with 15,000 hours that won't charge you nearly as much as the 141 joint will.

I personally would get recurrent in what you know...trusty, reliable Cessna. Once you are current, then you can get checked out on some of the LSA planes that may be available to rent.
+1 on the cost differences. The part 141 has to pay for classrooms, ground instructors,etc. I got all my instruction out of small flight schools
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Old 07-22-2019, 09:05 PM   #34
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Yep, I probably will. If I have it, I know the most likely places it will be (boxes in the garage).
I found my log book.

Inside the front cover is my "Medical Certificate Third Class and Student Pilot Certificate" dated 3/16/1986 and signed by my father, who was a doctor and a pilot who also had a CFI and was also a medical examiner for private pilots.

I was OK'ed for solo in a C-150 and also for solo XC in a C-172.

I have recorded 183 landings, 53.2 hours in SEL, 18.7 hours cross country, 48.9 hours day, 4.3 hours night, 1.1 simulated instrument, 36.1 dual received, 17.1 pilot in command, and 53.2 hours total flight duration.

My last logged flight was 3/17/1988.

Along with my log book, I saved a bunch of old student pilot handbooks, a manual flight computer thing, and other miscellany.
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Old 07-22-2019, 09:15 PM   #35
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I found my log book.
Super. Cha-CHING! Obviously, you'll still need to fly as many hours as it takes to be proficient and pass your checkride, but this may save some money. And having the hours documented may also decrease your insurance rates, even if they are very old hours.
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