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Old 11-06-2020, 05:59 PM   #61
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Retired five years, not taking Social security. Earning some from a side gig. Net worth up 15%.
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Old 11-06-2020, 09:55 PM   #62
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Retired: 8-1/2 years ago

SS: Wife started SS 1 year ago, still postponing mine

Investable assets (not counting homes): 1.6x the value back in 2012

WR: Highly variable, but overall, going down each year

With Quicken, it's very easy to get the total expenses since I retired. And same with income. Subtract the income from the expenses, and that is what I took from various after-tax accounts (some got depleted and closed down), plus IRA withdrawals once I got to 59-1/2.

The total WR in the 8-1/2 years is 28.9% of the beginning portfolio value. Divide that 28.9% by 8.5 years, and I get the average WR of 3.4%/yr.

But when I started retirement, my expenses were a lot higher with kids in college, and we had quite a bit of non-recurrent expenses like home updates/repairs, etc... My recent 12-month WR is 0.6% of portfolio value as of today.

From 3-4% down to 0.6%? Yes, due to several factors. We eat and drink less. Just kidding. There's some truth to that, but what we spend on food is not that much compared to whatever else.

Kids flew the coop, homes not needing work recently (except for the DIY solar thing which is still ongoing), no travel, not even RV'ing, wife's drawing SS. The portfolio goes up, and the WR goes down in dollar amount, and so the WR goes down even more in percentage. It all adds up.

It is good to go through and look at the numbers. Without Quicken, I would be hard pressed to come up with any of the above info. Most happy thing is the 1.6x increase in portfolio value. I will not tell you what the 0.6x increase is in dollar amount, but it is a 7-figure number. Heh heh heh...

How did this happen? Why has the market grown that much? How are we all so lucky?


PS. Note that none of the above numbers are adjusted for inflation. Too much work for that.
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Old 11-07-2020, 07:03 AM   #63
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Years retired :7.5 (both me an DW)
Pension and SS: $0, SS is still at least 10 years out and I'm a skeptic - not counting on anything from it - but both DW and I have made enough contributions to get a decent monthly check if things stay as they are
Investible assets: ~3.3X the value at retirement in 2013
Withdrawal rate: 0%

We are living well off a mix of some remaining rental income and dividends from the portfolio. Note that the large increase in the portfolio is a mix of rapidly appreciated tech shares (almost 60% is 'unrealized gains') and having sold off rental property which also appreciated much more than we anticipated.

Though I may appear smug with this very fortunate early retirement financial situation; I'm actually somewhat paranoid. I've lived long enough to see both real estate and stock market crashes (especially tech stocks) several times in the past and think we are way overdue for another one. So run this survey again in a year or two and things may look very different...
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Old 11-07-2020, 08:16 AM   #64
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Originally Posted by Time2 View Post
For those that have been retired for several years, what is the % increase cor decrease in your NW?
Years retired____
With pension or SS___
Percentage increase____
Withdrawal rate*____
* of Nest Egg only, if known.
Retired for 3.5 years.
No Pension or SS Income (took Lump Sum).
23% Increase in Total Net Worth since Early Retirement after all expenses.
No fixed Withdraw Rate, just enjoying ourselves as desired.
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Old 11-07-2020, 11:09 AM   #65
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Years retired__18__
With pension or SS_$52k__
Percentage increase__132%__
Withdrawal rate*__2%__

We are attempting to increase our WD to reduce the portfolio growth but Covid is working against us (cancelled $15k Europe trip).
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Old 11-07-2020, 12:05 PM   #66
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I have Social Security and a very conservative portfolio that is up about 5% from the day I retired. I take between 4-5%, maybe could take more but have a lifetime frugality addiction. I prefer to think of it as having X months of expenses above the portfolio principal. I expected to use “the 4% plan” and spend down but disregarding inflation, have not.

Retired 12 years (August 2008, age 61, 74 now), took a 10-year payout on a small pension, 1/4 of expenses was medical insurance until Medicare kicked in, another 1/4 of expenses vanished in June 2014.

Corona Era has decreased my expenses by $1,200 plus, more lucratively, I will owe no taxes for 2020 and possibly 2021 because RMDs are not required, also my landlord was not allowed to raise the rent until Oct. 21 but has opted to continue not raising it and is putting off charging allowable passthroughs, apparently for the duration of the pandemic. Market rate for a one-bedroom has gone from $3,600 to $2,700 negotiable with few takers while outgoing moving vans are a common sight. I have rent stabilization and after 26 years, rent is about 1/3 of expenses. My social and short trip expenses have disappeared leaving lots of room for big delivery tips.

A main financial regret is that I didn’t retire 18 months sooner.
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Old 11-07-2020, 12:20 PM   #67
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^^^ Good to see you post again, CJ.
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Old 11-07-2020, 12:41 PM   #68
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^^^ Good to see you post again, CJ.
Glad to see you and other familiar members still posting.
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Old 11-07-2020, 12:47 PM   #69
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Hey Joe, nice to see you. Stick around and join in the fun.
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Old 11-07-2020, 02:42 PM   #70
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this was my original post a few days ago:
retired in ‘05. NW has nearly trippled. withdrawl rate is 0%, most of it in mutual funds but also a good chunk of cash. living off of pensions and SS. zero debt. life is good so far.

went back and actually did the math. the increase between week 45 in my retirement year and week 45 this year was 139.77%. life is still good.
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Old 11-07-2020, 03:59 PM   #71
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this was my original post a few days ago:
retired in 05. NW has nearly trippled. withdrawl rate is 0%, most of it in mutual funds but also a good chunk of cash. living off of pensions and SS. zero debt. life is good so far.

went back and actually did the math. the increase between week 45 in my retirement year and week 45 this year was 139.77%. life is still good.
I ask myself this question also: SO what are you going to DO with your stash if you are living off pension and SS? In my case, I've been funding kid's down payments and favorite charities. But, if nothing else changes (and I hope it doesn't) I'll die with more than I need. Maybe a better question to ask (us) is "why did we save so much?" I think in my case, it was genetic. I was wired that way. I was never much of an investor, but always a world-class saver. It's been difficult to reverse that - though RMD's have 'helped.' YMMV
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Old 11-07-2020, 04:58 PM   #72
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^^^ Us also first class savers, so so investors.
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Old 11-07-2020, 06:00 PM   #73
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Retired 27 years. Age 77. Pension(non-cola) plus SS(early) up to 30k. Last ten years Vanguard computer says 7%/yr for portfolio.

Heh heh heh -
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Old 11-07-2020, 06:33 PM   #74
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For those that have been retired for several years, what is the % increase cor decrease in your NW?
Years retired - 7++
With pension or SS - No pension, 10 more years to 70 then will trigger SS
Percentage increase - NW doubled in that time, been a good run! That includes a small inheritance +, paying a lump sum out for my 2 kids college costs -, and a huge forex loss on an AUD loan I made to a needy relative -.
Withdrawal rate - I just use this simple formula: Annual Expenses / NW.

For the first 3-4 years in California = 1.62
For the next 3-4 in Asia & S. American = 0.81
- Part of this is way lower costs & part is a higher denominator (yeah)


Bottom line - should probably loosen the purse strings but just don't see the need...





* of Nest Egg only, if known.
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Old 11-08-2020, 07:59 AM   #75
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Retired in 2009 at age 48
with no pension or SS,
my net worth has more than doubled, about 130% increase,
withdrawal rate < 2% based on current NW

I start collecting a pension in January,
SS is still a long way off.
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Old 11-08-2020, 12:07 PM   #76
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Retired Sept 2008, just over 12 years. No FICA/ACA/Medi/pension, living on savings, dividends/interest/cap gains. 57. Planning on taking at 62.5 before currency ruined.

Allocation was 96/4 RE/Cash. Now 13/86/1 structured debt/stock/cash.

Net worth has gone from 447k to 1.484M during retirement.

Spending avg 2400/month. Annualized ROI (after life return) is about 10.5% a year.

WR is about 30k a year, so started at 6.7% now at 2%.
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Old 11-09-2020, 12:10 PM   #77
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15+ years years retired
We both receive SS and we have several pensions (pays all expenses)
Since all withdrawals (RMD) are reinvested, I guess I have a 0% WR at this time.
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Old 11-09-2020, 12:19 PM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mickeyd View Post
15+ years years retired
We both receive SS and we have several pensions (pays all expenses)
Since all withdrawals (RMD) are reinvested, I guess I have a 0% WR at this time.
I think the OP was asking:
"... what % has your NW increased or decreased?"

How does your Net Worth compare from before you retired, to today?
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Old 11-26-2020, 10:57 AM   #79
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Having updated my net worth tracking spreadsheet recently due to new highs (knock on wood!!!):

I had some interesting personal data to share.

I track our net worth against inflation, since over a long period of time that is what matters to us. If we beat inflation, we win the game. Any excess above inflation we feel like is a gift. We are fine with spending down our investments, but it's nice when they beat inflation.

I have net worth tracked against Dec 1999 (I retired in August 1999), and Dec 2011. So I'm comparing almost 20 years and also the recent seven years. The two time periods simply have to do my record keeping and are coincidental.

What is interesting is that the real growth over the two time periods is virtually identical:
  • Growth in net worth since Dec 1999 is 104.5%, but after almost 21 years of inflation, real growth is 49.80%
  • Growth in net worth since Dec 2011 is 65.2%, but after almost 9 years of inflation is 49.85%
That indicates that real growth went below zero at some point during 2000-2011, and recovered by the end of 2011, and that is basically what happened. The difficult 2000-2011 period (which had two nasty bear markets) we at least managed to catch back up with inflation by the end of it, but the real growth happened after that period. Well - actually didn't break even until 9/2012. At 12/2011 we were still down 10% in real terms. Also, FWIW, inflation from 2012 - 2020 has been quite a bit lower than the previous period. And obviously, the longer the time period, the bigger the bite from cumulative inflation.

I use the following calculator for cumulative inflation over long time periods. http://inflationdata.com/inflation/i...alculator.aspx
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Old 11-26-2020, 11:37 AM   #80
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Retired July 2009 at 51.
Net Worth up 125% since then.
Pension of $36k now. Another one of $15k at 65. Both non cola'd.
SS at 67 or 70 haven't decided yet.
Withdrawal rate about 1%.
Can't seem to spend more so am starting to give it away!
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