Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-20-2020, 12:57 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Nemo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 8,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcbraemer View Post
Funny, after reading this thread and this comment I looked up to realize that "Live for Today" had been playing on the speaker. The Grass Roots, I believe!
I was on the elliptical listening to this: "My body's aching and my time is at hand."

James Taylor.
__________________
"Exit, pursued by a bear."

The Winter's Tale, William Shakespeare
Nemo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-20-2020, 04:17 PM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
bolt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 394
A good friend whom was Bostons Central Artery & The Big Dig's primary architect recently retired @82/83'ish yrs old.
He succinctly viewed ones lifeline on an actual "tape measure" using .gov metrics.
Then he changed the numbers to %'s.
He, like Hank Paulson*(financialcrisis08) jockeyed back and forth between .gov employment and private industry retiring with .gov service bennies for close to 60yrs.
Life's not fair eeh?
Its not theoretical, its pragmatic.
__________________
It ainít what you donít know that gets you into trouble. Itís what you know for sure that just ainít so.
bolt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2020, 05:57 PM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 203
This video emphasizes to me just how lucky I am to be set up to retire now. Yes, I worry about the ability to get health insurance once COBRA runs out, but I will find a state that protects people with pre-existing conditions if the ACA is struck down. Work has made me sad and miserable. Being forced to work on stupid projects, at the mercy of terrible bosses, and having to interact with people when I’m a natural introvert. Everything screams, “enjoy your life and never return to an office!”

So why am I still conducting a job search? Why am I hoping that one of the companies I interviewed with will call with an offer, or at least move me to the next step of the selection process? Why do I feel anxiety about not being chosen? I wish I understood why I’m feeling like I need to go back to work when financially I’m fine, and work has never made me happy in the past. Maybe my identity has been so rooted in my job and career that I’m having trouble letting it go? Or because I was laid off instead of being allowed to control when I left?

I don’t know but these mixed up feelings are unsettling.
Poopycat is offline   Reply With Quote
This Is How Terribly Short Your Life Is
Old 05-20-2020, 07:05 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Markola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 2,318
This Is How Terribly Short Your Life Is

Oneís reaction to this video is highly individualistic. It assumes ďeveryone hates their jobĒ and career at 22. I didnít and I donít consider my life up to this point at 54 ďwasted,Ē by any means, just the product of choices Iíve made, feel grateful for and accept responsibility for. I remember tromping around in the woods with wet boots for weeks on a job at age 24 and deciding, ďScrew this noise. I want to be in a dry office with unlimited coffee nearby.Ē I certainly had zero interest in making YouTube videos like this guy, who has found his calling and seems to want to preach about it.

Lately, I want something different than an office environment and am planning accordingly. Thanks to excess savings my profession afforded me, I can follow my new interests. The tragedy is people who go through a career unintentionally, donít save, and donít have the means to make a change when their bucket almost inevitably runneth over after doing anything for too long.
Markola is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanks sheldon cornped.
Old 05-20-2020, 07:16 PM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
samm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 218
Thanks sheldon cornped.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sheldon cornped View Post
If you are contemplating whether to ER or not and especially if you fall in the OMY category, this clip might push you off the fence.


Great video. This is why I retired ASAP at 60.
samm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2020, 07:52 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Upstate
Posts: 1,745
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6miths View Post
Interesting on the mowing the grass. Yesterday, DS said, 'Dad I finally get why you like working in the yard.' This after he had helped me by pulling a few weeds. He said that it allows one to focus on something simple and take one's mind off the stresses of life. Turns out my DS is becoming wise. From the time I started cutting grass at about age 8 I have always enjoyed it for many reasons. Certainly, DS is correct that removing one's mind from the stress of life is one aspect but there are many others. Small things well done, tending plants, working in the dirt with one's hands, being outside, physical labour when one's primary occupation doesn't involve same, making something look appealing, etc. Finding satisfaction in small things is part of mindfulness and practicing thankfulness and gratitude. I don't look forward to the day when I can't mow the lawn, appreciate the smell of cut grass or stretch out in the sun on the turf. Soon enough I'll be under it! (Or in my case, just spread around as fertilizer).

I'm not crazy about yard work (at all), but I don't mind cutting the grass. One of the things I did when I retired was to get rid of my riding mower. Now I cut about an acre with a power push mower (no power assist), some of it hilly. Why? Well, I figured it was sort of a 'forced' exercise. Sometimes I regret the decision, but usually not. I just listen to a podcast w/ear protection on top and enjoy the day (somewhat).
copyright1997reloaded is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2020, 10:15 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
jollystomper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,710
This is why everyday I am thankful that (a) I had a college major and career job that I enjoyed and (b) it was lucrative enough that I could retire at 60 and choose not to work. Any time I have left now is just a bonus.
__________________
FIREd date: June 26, 2018 - wwwwwwhat a rush!
jollystomper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2020, 12:25 AM   #28
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 513
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheldon cornped View Post
the OMY category
??
Bongleur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2020, 05:01 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Badger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 2,012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maenad View Post
I'm glad they didn't jump into the "follow your dream and the money will follow" b.s. that so many carpe diem videos propose. The message was more of a "be aware of the cost and benefit of your choices, that making yourself miserable today and solely living for tomorrow has a very high price". I can't argue with a message to think about our choices and decisions, being thoughtful is generally better than being mindless.
I did this and had a very happy and enjoyable life. The career path I chose was what I wanted, the money was enough to take care of my needs with some to save, colleagues were of like mind and interesting, and I had a lot of time to travel and enjoy myself. I could have retired years earlier than I did but I was having a good time. At one point I left and spent 10 years in another job for the money that was fun at first for the novelty and the respect given. However, eventually the money couldn't offset the drudge and the problems many complain about when going for the money so I went back to my dream for the next 20+ years before retiring. My experiences taught me that living a life that is enjoyable every day while preparing for the future is better than being miserable at a job until you retire.


Cheers!
Badger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2020, 07:59 AM   #30
Moderator
sengsational's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,337
When I see high production value videos, I'm left wondering who pays for them... what's the business model? Not curious enough to dig. I like that if more people thought this way, wages would be pushed higher.



The logic is very flawed, but agree with the sentiment.
sengsational is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2020, 11:44 AM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Markola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 2,318
Iím told every 1 million views generates about $500. So this oneís 1.5 million views has earned it $750. I canít verify that except that I heard someone knowledgeable say it. Maybe thereís also value to a film makerís portfolio in advertising their services.
Markola is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2020, 12:20 PM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
skipro33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Placerville
Posts: 1,586
This video exactly points out why I started taking SS early; 62. My remaining years are going to be restricted on what I can do by my health and physical ability. Waiting until 70 to take AND enjoy the benefits of SS funds also comes with being unable to do those things I would want to do now. Now I kayak on the ocean, ski the mountains, work on landscaping projects, ride motorcycles, hike, fish, etc. As time goes by, it's less and less likely that my health will allow me to do those things past age 70. When I'm old, sitting on the front porch in a rocking chair, I do not want regrets of things I could have done back when I was able, but put off for a few more bucks in a bank account that can't buy me those experiences my body no longer can enjoy.
skipro33 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2020, 01:01 PM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,301
Quote:
Originally Posted by skipro33 View Post
This video exactly points out why I started taking SS early; 62. My remaining years are going to be restricted on what I can do by my health and physical ability. Waiting until 70 to take AND enjoy the benefits of SS funds also comes with being unable to do those things I would want to do now. Now I kayak on the ocean, ski the mountains, work on landscaping projects, ride motorcycles, hike, fish, etc. As time goes by, it's less and less likely that my health will allow me to do those things past age 70. When I'm old, sitting on the front porch in a rocking chair, I do not want regrets of things I could have done back when I was able, but put off for a few more bucks in a bank account that can't buy me those experiences my body no longer can enjoy.
+1000. I ER'd at 52 and did the hiking, riding, all the hobbies I didn't have time for before starting at ER a totally different life in the Oregon forests which I've enjoyed immensely. This all came to abrupt halt at the end of last year at age 69+ when I developed a serious autoimmune disease that put the paid to all my outdoor activities. I wouldn't trade the last 17 years of bliss for all the money in the world.
ejman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2020, 01:20 PM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,517
Quote:
Originally Posted by copyright1997reloaded View Post
I'm not crazy about yard work (at all), but I don't mind cutting the grass. One of the things I did when I retired was to get rid of my riding mower. Now I cut about an acre with a power push mower (no power assist), some of it hilly. Why? Well, I figured it was sort of a 'forced' exercise. Sometimes I regret the decision, but usually not. I just listen to a podcast w/ear protection on top and enjoy the day (somewhat).
I'm all in on the exercise aspect of DIY. Mow or walk mindlessly on a treadmill? It's a nobrainer. This week DW and I mowed and redid our lakehouse drive way. Cut sod and expanded it with a 12 ton topper of crushed stone. All by hand with a mattock, two shovels and a couple of rakes. It's great to be the old geezers nobody will mess with.
__________________
Took SS at 62 and hope I live long enough to regret the decision.
foxfirev5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2020, 07:56 AM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 7,409
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
When I retired at 60, while I was really enjoying my work, I said to myself, I have spent 25 years getting ready and 35 year executing, and now I will spend 25 years reaping the rewards.

Now that I am 17 years into it with 8 years to go, I really appreciate those that retire even earlier! Why take the chance? We just bought our final retirement condo and are enjoying every minute of it!
__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2020, 09:59 AM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
jollystomper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,710
Quote:
Originally Posted by skipro33 View Post
This video exactly points out why I started taking SS early; 62. My remaining years are going to be restricted on what I can do by my health and physical ability. Waiting until 70 to take AND enjoy the benefits of SS funds also comes with being unable to do those things I would want to do now. Now I kayak on the ocean, ski the mountains, work on landscaping projects, ride motorcycles, hike, fish, etc. As time goes by, it's less and less likely that my health will allow me to do those things past age 70. When I'm old, sitting on the front porch in a rocking chair, I do not want regrets of things I could have done back when I was able, but put off for a few more bucks in a bank account that can't buy me those experiences my body no longer can enjoy.
Excellent point!

It does seem a good idea to consider taking SS early if your main pursuits involve physical activity. We are guaranteed to have that ability for physical activity reduced as we age. Soto me it does make sense to trade off a lower but earlier SS payment if it helps one pursue those things one will not be able to do when older.
__________________
FIREd date: June 26, 2018 - wwwwwwhat a rush!
jollystomper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2020, 01:26 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,993
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxfirev5 View Post
I'm all in on the exercise aspect of DIY. Mow or walk mindlessly on a treadmill? It's a nobrainer. This week DW and I mowed and redid our lakehouse drive way. Cut sod and expanded it with a 12 ton topper of crushed stone. All by hand with a mattock, two shovels and a couple of rakes. It's great to be the old geezers nobody will mess with.
Great work! Totally agree. One of my pet peeves has always been the gym rats with the great muscles who can never find the time to help me break rocks. Probably going to have to use the wrong muscle groups!
6miths is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2020, 02:59 PM   #38
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre1969 View Post
For some reason, this made me think of a calculation I did a few years ago. A friend of mine, who lives in DC, in a rowhouse that was converted to condos, had a small backyard. The mowable part was probably around 10x15 feet, at the most. He just hit it with a weed whacker. Yet, he griped about having to "cut the grass", and mentioned that he couldn't even fathom the idea of being out in the suburbs or more rural areas (like where I live), because of all the grass cutting. I simply told him that "you get used to it" and "it's not that bad" and so forth, but he didn't want to hear any of it.

Anyway, I think I was around 42 at the time. I probably started cutting the grass when I was around 10, when Granddad taught me how to drive the lawn tractor. Being out in the boonies, we don't have an HOA breathing down our necks, so we can sometimes let the grass go a bit before cutting it. On average, I'd say 10 cuts per year, at 2 hours per cut, is an over-estimation. But, let's use that. That's 20 hours per year. Over the course of 32 years, that would have been 640 hours of my life. Or roughly 26 days and 16 hours.

So, at the age of 42, not even a month of my life had been devoted to cutting the grass. Even now, at the age of 50, that would only be 800 hours, or roughly 33 days and 8 hours. As I've gotten older, I've learned I like cutting the grass less and less. When I was a kid, it was exciting, like being one step closer to driving a car. But now it just seems repetitive and dull. Plus, now that I've moved, I have a much larger yard. I let the grass go about 4 weeks without cutting, and as a result it took almost 7 hours to cut it all.

Still, to put it in perspective, even if it took me 70 hours total to cut the grass this year, that's about the equivalent of 11 weeks worth of commuting back and forth to work for me. And, I know I'm not going to cut it 10 times over the course of the year. Last year I think it only got cut 5-6x, and later in the season when it was drier, it didn't take as long.

So, whenever I'm having trouble finding the ambition to cut the grass, I remember this little math exercise, to put it in perspective. Even though it drones on and seems to take forever, in the overall scheme of things it's such a tiny portion of my life.

Another statistic I just figured out. With my current commute (75 minutes round trip on a good day, 5x per week), in about 2 1/2 years, I will have spent the same amount of time driving to and from work as I did cutting grass for 40 years!

Now that, more than anything else, makes me want to retire!
Growing up, I spent a lot of time cutting the grass at my house. It was tedious and time-consuming, but I had to do it.

Here in CA, my house is so close to my neighbor's, that the little bit of grass to be cut gets done by gardeners. When I travel back East, I see such large yards, and they're beautiful to look at, but oh my, the weekly maintenance must be a PITA. Especially some of the medians along the highways are all grass, it just looks like a lot of work.
Elbata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2020, 08:21 PM   #39
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 580
Thought it was interesting that the sample person in the video had 525,600 hours left. Thatís the number of minutes in a year. (Which I know because of that song from Rent.)
__________________
Saved 8 figures by my mid-40's as a professional bubble-spotter. Beware...the Fed creates bubble after bubble after bubble.
RenoJay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2020, 08:56 PM   #40
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 471
I retired at 57 in 2003 due to a disability that caused chronic pain. No fun
At age 60 I was diagnosed with stage 3 pancreatic cancer. Had immediate surgery followed by chemo and radiation? This cancer had a 5-year survival rate of 10%. I believe the survival rates are a little better today.

My point is that you never know what the future holds so if early retirement is your goal then by all means do it. Remember the old cliche "No one on their death bed ever said they wished they had spent more time at the office".
2soon2tell is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Terribly sad news about Linda Ronstadt bondi688 Other topics 16 09-01-2013 01:21 AM
Life is Precious--and Sometimes Short ScottFromUtah Life after FIRE 30 11-01-2010 06:49 AM
beware of short life on lamps in dlp televisions mathjak107 Other topics 3 11-18-2006 09:00 AM
Having a hard time waiting to be FIRE: life's too short... bearkeley Young Dreamers 15 09-29-2005 05:56 PM
Life is Short Video retire@40 Other topics 0 03-26-2005 06:37 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:18 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.