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Old 11-08-2020, 10:49 AM   #21
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Maybe they should rename those communities, from 55+ to 70+ so people won't be fooled
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Old 11-09-2020, 10:11 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by jrcunniff View Post
My (internal) debate on Move vs Stay is focused more on having to rebuild my network of friends and professional services (doctors, etc.).

I had always dreamed of retiring to a vacation/beach home. But as I think about the reality of it, do I want to move hours away to a new home where I have to develop new friendships? Especially as a single guy with no wife/gf accompanying me.


...



DW and I made the decisions to move to SE Arizona after living in Frozen Flyover for decades. I always dreamed of living "out West", so this was the best deal that we could afford. We love the mountains, the warm winters, and year-round outdoor opportunities.


Regarding friends, we realized that our closest friends, the ones we talk with weekly and visit regularly, are fairly new, only a few years old. Many of our older relationships have gradually waned as circumstances have evolved. Recently, a friend commented that we are outgoing enough to meet new friends anywhere. This realization, and the crappy northern winters (and springs and falls and a good part of the summer) made us realize it was time to chase our dream and head west.

It has been an enormous amount of w*rk. Long distance moving is an order of magnitude tougher that an in-town move. Still, it has given us a new lease on life. We're building new friendships while we enjoy our old ones by phone as if we were still there.

We carefully researched most amenities such as food and shopping, but professional services has been a pain. We are currently struggling with dentist, eye doctors, and chiropractors. There are plenty to choose from, but it's been hard to replace the stellar service we received in our old city. Hopefully, we'll do better once we have a larger social network. Still, no regrets about finally moving, something I wanted to do for decades, but was constrained by w*rk.
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Old 11-09-2020, 10:18 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Sunset View Post
Maybe they should rename those communities, from 55+ to 70+ so people won't be fooled



Nuts! Now you tell me

I asked 80 yo buddy of mine if he checked out any 55+ communities before he bought "regular" condo in FL. He snapped: "Never! Too many old people!"

We now live in a SFH in an all-ages community down the road from a 55+. Once, while slowly biking down the street in the 55+ section, someone yelled that we were too energetic! Lots of folks with walkers, oxygen, or worse. Yikes! I think I need "age diversity".

Now I'm inclined to tough hang onto our SFH until it's time for assisted living or worse. Tried the condo/townhome thing too. Nope, never again.

Thanks all for the perspectives on 55+ communities.
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Old 11-10-2020, 08:05 AM   #24
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I donít doubt it. The only communities we looked at were new Epcon neighborhoods and they had decidedly younger residents for the most part. But we had the foresight to look at some well established (20-30 years) 55+ communities too and it was awful. The community center looked like an elder care facility with wheelchairs, walkers and oxygen bottles everywhere. Even people outside looked infirmed. Not for us.
Thanks for that insight and your previous post. DW and I have been thinking about the 55+ communities, and didn't take this into account (only have looked at one under development).

This was the trend at my MIL/FILs assisted living place. Since it was a new development, it was mostly a "younger" group of old people, making the move from their homes, and most people were still active and in good shape. But add 10~15 years to that group, and a trip through the dining area gets pretty depressing, lots of people in not so great shape. Having that be your daily environment might not be so great. Though we appreciated all the support they got there.

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Old 11-10-2020, 04:17 PM   #25
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Got an update from our friends (early 70s) who recently moved to the over 55 community. Unfortunately, he fell during a tennis game and now has a blood clot on the brain which will probably need to be surgically removed. SHE has ben showered with help from her neighbors who treat her like family. I think I could live in a place like that though YMMV.
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Old 11-13-2020, 07:10 PM   #26
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I had some 55+ housing near me. They were not only small for the money, had limited storage place but they were also paying through the nose for HOA fees each month - more than 10 times higher than I was paying on my home 3 times the size.
Check out the communities - not only the cost but the atmosphere. I have heard of some that were couples only so when a spouse died, the surviving spouse had to move.
when I moved a few years ago at 58, I chose a townhouse so I could leave it to travel and not have to worry about lawn maintenance. It turns out that so many older people are in this complex that some people think is has 55+ age restrictions.
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Old 11-13-2020, 07:50 PM   #27
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I live in a 55+ community. It sucks. Stay where you are.
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Old 11-14-2020, 03:33 PM   #28
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We moved to a community in another state that is not a 55+ but is like a 55+because most who own here are over 50. Some are second home owners. Some are also snowbirds or weekenders. Lots of golf carts, boats and motorcycles. (We don't have any of them). Most are in their 50's I would say, but some in their 60's like us, 70's and some in their 80's. A nice mixture. Plus their married children come to visit and their grandchildren. So a little of everything. My next door neighbors are 32 years old! Many people here still are working. Most are married but many singles as well, including widows and widowers. One thing- there are an awful lot of dog owners here!



Most active. Heck- we have an 85 year old guy here that goes to the gym 3 hours per day. he also bikes everywhere!. But I would say most are 50's and 60's and active. A lot of golfers as there are golf courses nearby. I heard one guy say he races cars.


Our 2600 square foot former home was newly remodeled from top to bottom. Our goal was whatever we got for it when we sold it that is all we could spend on a new home INCLUDING all the moving costs, atty fees, closing costs, and things we would have to do to the new house once we moved into it. And the extra expense of the temporary rental we were in after our home sold until my husband could retire and our new home was finished being built.Not an easy feat but we pulled it off. And just 4 miles from a town that I wanted to live in but that did not have this kind of community vibe we were looking for and for an affordable price.

I say it was no easy feat because in the area we lived in the homes did not appreciate like they have in other parts of the state and country. We did get back the remodeling costs ($100,000) but not any appreciation above what we paid for the house 32 years ago ($208,000). We sold it last year for $317,000.

The new, one level, 1100 square foot ranch house we purchased cost $274,400 with the extras we put in through the builder. (Base price was $249,000). Once moved in we put more money into it like a whole house generator, a security system, and lots of other things that added up quickly- and we are generally frugal.

I think we have about $2000 left over and we need to have the little driveway sealed next year and some more odds and ends done. But we will not go over this amount, except if something needs repairs obviously. Hopefully nothing as it is a brand new house.


The HOA fees here are just $150 per month. 85 homes so a nice, intimate vibe. Clubhouse, pool, law mowing, private road snow plowing, and trash pick up. The HOA is flexible so strict about lawn decor and so forth.

Can walk to the beach, boardwalk and boating nearby if that is your thing. Restaurants, shopping, medical services. It is a vacation area. 4 season - has lots of winter activities- again if you are into that.

Our only son also lives 45 minutes from here and works 10 minutes from here. Tax situation is good overall.

Our former home was nice- but secluded on 10 1/2 acres in the woods. Great to come home to when we worked but not good for aging in. Too lonely. Especially whenever the time would come that you cannot drive, though that is still far away for us as we are in our 60's. High property taxes as well.

Yes there are some things we do not like about the new place. The homes are right on top of each other. Very tiny lot- and I mean tiny! In summer the area around us gets noisy because there are camps surrounding our development. The house is small- a newly constructed ranch- 1100 square feet- no views except of neighbors walls- though some seasonal views to the back of us of the bay and mountains- and trees. Hubby and I on top of each other. Good thing he goes down into the basement to his workbench. LOL! He does not have much to do with the new house and that is a plus but also a negative in terms of keeping him busy.

But the positives outweigh the negatives. We have made friends- one has a boat and has been kind enough to take us out several times on the lake. Even during this hard year we have had some nice get togethers with the neighbors. Went on group walks. We never had this. We had no neighbors nor did we have friends that lived nearby in our former home state.

I find it nice that even taking a walk I can wave to someone or someone might stop and chat with me when I am sitting on the front porch. If my husband needs advice or help with something he is doing at the house another man will come over and help out. Even little things like we needed to borrow a bigger ladder- we can ask around- and we have a community Facebook page and HOA website that we can communicate with other people here through.


And it is nice to see neighbors helping the older neighbors out that might need it. Maybe a meal here or their, just checking up on them, shoveling their driveways, etc. It's all good.



If it wasn't for the virus stuff there would be some activities going on in the development- just a few- usually organized by the residents themselves, like a Halloween or Xmas party, card games, etc. But some of us have managed to do things together safely.

Having a small, low maintenance home is great but people need to really downsize- accept the fact that they have way too much stuff- and purge. My motto is keep it simple!

I feel moving only gets harder as you get older. So moving now in our 60's got us transplanted and settled. Better than doing it in your 80's!
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Old 11-14-2020, 03:40 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by umograd83 View Post
I live in a 55+ community. It sucks. Stay where you are.
Best laugh I had today - thanks!

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Originally Posted by imnontrad View Post
they were also paying through the nose for HOA fees each month .
I donít know if the 55+ communities work the same way (probably) but my HOA fee is ridiculous (this is just for a regular complex, not a 55+), and on top of that the association regularly throws ďspecial assessmentĒ charges at us for improvements not covered by the normal HOA fee. Right now, and for the next few years, Iím paying a quarterly fee for new roofs going on the buildings. A few years ago, it was to replace the decks on units. And of course, youíre at the mercy of the association to do the due diligence of getting estimates and making logical choices that you trust for contractors, materials, etc.

My advice to anyone moving to an association (condo complex, senior housing, etc.), in addition to the fee amount and what it covers, ask for (1) historical payments, and (2) how the association handles repairs/updates not covered by the HOA fee.
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Old 11-14-2020, 04:42 PM   #30
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Maybe they should rename those communities, from 55+ to 70+ so people won't be fooled

Some now are 62+ communities!
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Old 11-14-2020, 07:43 PM   #31
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Congratulations on the life you've built for yourself. Stay where you are.

I don't know that we'd be very happy in a 55 and older community. Although we're 70 & 72, we're especially young in our minds for our age and a generation younger than those Old People.

To top it off, we're so fortunate to be raising our 9 year old granddaughter, and there's nothing like listening to her music everywhere we go in the car.
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Old 11-14-2020, 08:00 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by meleana View Post
We moved to a community in another state that is not a 55+ but is like a 55+because most who own here are over 50. Some are second home owners. Some are also snowbirds or weekenders. Lots of golf carts, boats and motorcycles. (We don't have any of them). Most are in their 50's I would say, but some in their 60's like us, 70's and some in their 80's. A nice mixture. Plus their married children come to visit and their grandchildren. So a little of everything. My next door neighbors are 32 years old! Many people here still are working. Most are married but many singles as well, including widows and widowers. One thing- there are an awful lot of dog owners here!



Most active. Heck- we have an 85 year old guy here that goes to the gym 3 hours per day. he also bikes everywhere!. But I would say most are 50's and 60's and active. A lot of golfers as there are golf courses nearby. I heard one guy say he races cars.


Our 2600 square foot former home was newly remodeled from top to bottom. Our goal was whatever we got for it when we sold it that is all we could spend on a new home INCLUDING all the moving costs, atty fees, closing costs, and things we would have to do to the new house once we moved into it. And the extra expense of the temporary rental we were in after our home sold until my husband could retire and our new home was finished being built.Not an easy feat but we pulled it off. And just 4 miles from a town that I wanted to live in but that did not have this kind of community vibe we were looking for and for an affordable price.

I say it was no easy feat because in the area we lived in the homes did not appreciate like they have in other parts of the state and country. We did get back the remodeling costs ($100,000) but not any appreciation above what we paid for the house 32 years ago ($208,000). We sold it last year for $317,000.

The new, one level, 1100 square foot ranch house we purchased cost $274,400 with the extras we put in through the builder. (Base price was $249,000). Once moved in we put more money into it like a whole house generator, a security system, and lots of other things that added up quickly- and we are generally frugal.

I think we have about $2000 left over and we need to have the little driveway sealed next year and some more odds and ends done. But we will not go over this amount, except if something needs repairs obviously. Hopefully nothing as it is a brand new house.


The HOA fees here are just $150 per month. 85 homes so a nice, intimate vibe. Clubhouse, pool, law mowing, private road snow plowing, and trash pick up. The HOA is flexible so strict about lawn decor and so forth.

Can walk to the beach, boardwalk and boating nearby if that is your thing. Restaurants, shopping, medical services. It is a vacation area. 4 season - has lots of winter activities- again if you are into that.

Our only son also lives 45 minutes from here and works 10 minutes from here. Tax situation is good overall.

Our former home was nice- but secluded on 10 1/2 acres in the woods. Great to come home to when we worked but not good for aging in. Too lonely. Especially whenever the time would come that you cannot drive, though that is still far away for us as we are in our 60's. High property taxes as well.

Yes there are some things we do not like about the new place. The homes are right on top of each other. Very tiny lot- and I mean tiny! In summer the area around us gets noisy because there are camps surrounding our development. The house is small- a newly constructed ranch- 1100 square feet- no views except of neighbors walls- though some seasonal views to the back of us of the bay and mountains- and trees. Hubby and I on top of each other. Good thing he goes down into the basement to his workbench. LOL! He does not have much to do with the new house and that is a plus but also a negative in terms of keeping him busy.

But the positives outweigh the negatives. We have made friends- one has a boat and has been kind enough to take us out several times on the lake. Even during this hard year we have had some nice get togethers with the neighbors. Went on group walks. We never had this. We had no neighbors nor did we have friends that lived nearby in our former home state.

I find it nice that even taking a walk I can wave to someone or someone might stop and chat with me when I am sitting on the front porch. If my husband needs advice or help with something he is doing at the house another man will come over and help out. Even little things like we needed to borrow a bigger ladder- we can ask around- and we have a community Facebook page and HOA website that we can communicate with other people here through.


And it is nice to see neighbors helping the older neighbors out that might need it. Maybe a meal here or their, just checking up on them, shoveling their driveways, etc. It's all good.



If it wasn't for the virus stuff there would be some activities going on in the development- just a few- usually organized by the residents themselves, like a Halloween or Xmas party, card games, etc. But some of us have managed to do things together safely.

Having a small, low maintenance home is great but people need to really downsize- accept the fact that they have way too much stuff- and purge. My motto is keep it simple!

I feel moving only gets harder as you get older. So moving now in our 60's got us transplanted and settled. Better than doing it in your 80's!
That was a great write-up. I don't mean to pry for details, but would you mind saying what state or general area your old home and new home were/are?
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Old 11-16-2020, 03:33 PM   #33
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Yes where ?? 270,000 near beach
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Old 11-29-2020, 02:20 PM   #34
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We have been members of this CCRC for about 18 months and often wonder why it took us so long to move here. Activities are great, amenities are great, food is great, cost is manageable, best of all the other residents (though old) are tops.
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Old 12-02-2020, 07:28 AM   #35
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I am now going to be 65 still waiting to take SS closer to 70 work PT as track coach local HS and sub teach as much or as little as I want.
i'm not a fan of 55+ communities. That would be something I would pursue with a rental for a while if i became interested. That lifestyle is something you need to experience before buying.

What you did post that caught my attention is the enjoyment that you evidently receive from your PT work. My career path was in academia and even though I retired (for health reasons) almost 10 years ago I still miss that enjoyment of working with young students looking forward to a future where anything is possible. It has the additional benefit of keeping you young.


Cheers!
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