Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-11-2020, 02:32 AM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,491
Have driven a lot in Italy - yes, the Italians can be capricious at times, however, for the most part it is similar to driving in Europe in general. Be careful of the narrow roads, slow down in the cities and be prepared to stop to let cars going the other way go through. The worst experience I had was driving in Florence - got boxed in trying to park (they park cars side-by-side 5 and 6 times deep) Very difficult to get out. They have small cars in general there, so you are a more maneuverable than the typical American or German car.

I had a student visa in Italy when I did a small stint in medical school in Milan. You will need to get your Fiscali number....that is your Italian SS. The Italian bureaucracy is notoriously sclerotic, even for Italians. Be prepared to wait in lines and deal with insanity. However, I found that the Italians were enamored that you as an American were there in Italy and wanted to become part of their community. If you were polite, they were exceedingly polite back. And if you tried to speak Italian, they really appreciated it.

Almost all financial transactions and appointments/official paperwork (I would have had to get a green card even though I had the student visa) are done through the post office. Moreover, the Italians tend to wait to the absolute last minute to finish the paperwork. Case in point, I received my passport with my student Visa via FEDEX on the day of my flight from the USA...they truly cut it that fine. And I found that approach was the attitude in general. To a planner like me that was very frustrating, anxiety-ridden and exasperating....

Do not mess with the enforcers - if you are riding any public transport, once you buy the ticket you must validate it with the stamp machine which can be found near the track. If you are found with it not validated you will pay the fine and it will be paid right there or they will force-ably take you from the train/bus and take you to the police station to pay the fine. They take cash and credit cards. I saw this happen on a train from the Milan airport to the center of town. And the policeman tended to choose tourists to check. There was a iron fist in velvet glove approach and they did not care if you did not know the rules. So make sure you know the rules.

It is similar here in Germany, however the enforcers do not wear uniforms. They dress in regular clothes and get on the bus/train and ask to see your pass/ticket. If you do not have it, they fine you. The Germans are real fans of the random reinforcement route....got asked many times when I live in Stuttgart and was taking the bus/train to airport from where I lived.
__________________
Deserat aka Bridget
“We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.”
deserat is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-11-2020, 05:43 AM   #22
Full time employment: Posting here.
atmsmshr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: An island off the coast of Florida. (Ok - if you really need to know it's Vero Beach)
Posts: 627
Kudos to anyone brave enough to drive in Rome and survive to tell the tale!
__________________
DW and I are 59/59. FIRE'd August 2019. Non-cola pension available but will remain untouched until mid sixties to grow, max SS for DH at FRA or 70. Mega retiree health available. IRA rollover from 401k Jan 2020 for NUA treatment. LTCG next few years. AA 40% stocks, 7% cash and 53% Intermediate Treasury fund. Rising equity glidepath.
atmsmshr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2020, 07:00 AM   #23
Moderator
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Flyover country
Posts: 18,788
I haven't yet been to Italy, but would love to visit. But I've had several friends who were stationed at the Aviano airbase which is north of Venice. I never heard any of them say anything but good about living there. Granted, life at an overseas military base is nothing like living on the economy, but still a good sign.
__________________
I thought growing old would take longer.
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2020, 09:05 AM   #24
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 12
No base housing inside the base. Most of us rented from locals.
Gringoretirado is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2020, 10:11 AM   #25
Full time employment: Posting here.
Bryan Barnfellow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 798
Research this carefully. Language is critical when you move from tourist to resident. And, believe me, after 50 or so the language neurons don't fire as easily.Also, keep in mind that if you are going to live off income derived from the US, in dollars, you will have to deal with the Dollar/Euro currency differential regularly. Also tax filing to both the US and Italy every year and trying to decipher correctly the US/Italy tax treaty (who gets to tax what income).

Finally, a note on Venice, there is "high water" now about 100 times a year, versus 10 a century ago. And it's increasing in frequency. There are many ground floor apartments (=1rst floor in the US) for sale/rent; be careful about claims of no flooding. Moving to Italy can be very rewarding w/ respect to lifestyle, but the devil is in the many details.

That said, best of luck.

-BB
__________________
FIREd, April 1, 2015. My Retirement Benefits Package includes: 6 months vacation, twice a year.
Bryan Barnfellow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2020, 05:35 PM   #26
Recycles dryer sheets
RetiredAtThirty-eight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by candrew View Post
If you can get by without a vehicle, it should save you some money as Italians pay more for gas than almost every other European nation. Last year, we paid about €5/gallon.
If you buy an EV for retirement in Italy, you can still get out and enjoy the countryside and small towns, wineries, etc. and you'll never have to buy gas again. Electricity in Italy costs about twice as much as the U.S. average which means it will still be a lot cheaper than gas in the US.
RetiredAtThirty-eight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2020, 08:09 PM   #27
Full time employment: Posting here.
urn2bfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 835
Venice supposedly has a higher cost of living. As
do many of the typical tourist centers. I hear Abruzzo region is very affordable as it has yet to be “discovered.”
urn2bfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2020, 12:13 AM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Huntsville, AL/Helen, GA
Posts: 5,011
I would love to live in Europe, however the Schengen Agreement limits Americans to staying in the EU only 90 days every 180 days.

Visa's are generally unavailable unless you're going there temporarily as a student. It's hard to pass yourself off as a college exchange student when you're 70 years old.

Therefore, it's very, very difficult to obtain a Visa where you're allowed to live in Italy. Portugal will issue a Visa if you bring a great deal of cash into the country. And sons/daughters and sometimes grandchildren of German citizens can obtain a EU passport allowing them to live there.

The whole deal is that these countries don't want U.S. citizens moving over there and overwhelming their already fragile health care systems. And they don't want Americans to drive up their home prices that are already excessively priced.
Bamaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2020, 05:48 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Austin
Posts: 1,011
Getting a work visa isn't that difficult for expats, that is as long as your company is paying for it and doing the legwork. I did that for 2 years in Germany.

A former boss of mine retired in Italy - His experience was similar to this article: https://www.thelocal.it/20200112/how...etire-in-italy
big-papa is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2020, 06:40 AM   #30
Full time employment: Posting here.
urn2bfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
I would love to live in Europe, however the Schengen Agreement limits Americans to staying in the EU only 90 days every 180 days.

...Portugal will issue a Visa if you bring a great deal of cash into the country.
Portugal has one of the most permissive and interesting Visa options called the Golden Visa that makes it the easiest of the EU countries for foreigners to immigrate to. There are a variety of ways to get the Golden Visa, but once obtained one could then stay in any of the EU Schengen countries like any EU citizen.

Briefly. The options for a Golden Visa involve either the big amount of money invested €1 Million, or create 10 jobs in Portugal, or invest in Portugal real estate worth at least €500,000, or smaller investments in the arts or scientific research can be made, though the kowest is €250,000. You also have to remain invested for a 5 years and spend at least a week a year in Portugal on average for the 5 years. There was a move afoot to crack down on these Golden Visas by restricting where the real estate could be to be eligible, basically removing the attractive locales from eligibility (think the coastal towns and Lisbon) Like so much in the world, that is in pause since Covid struck.
urn2bfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2020, 07:54 AM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 4,401
I still haven't done everything there is to do in my one state of Washington, much less the other 49 states, so it would be a long time before I would be ready to try out Europe...at the rate we explore, it would be something around year 2170 before I am bored with the USA. Good thing I invest in biotech.
Fermion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2020, 05:33 AM   #32
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Gozo, Malta
Posts: 35
Malta is a kind of English speaking version of Sicily. The food is similar and people are from a similar background. Its even more catholic than Rome. For much of its history Sicily and Malta had the same rulers. its only 50 miles south of Sicily and you can see Sicily from Malta on a clear day. The car ferry is less than 2 hours. Most of the stuff in the shops is from Italy. There is no crime like in Italy. So if your considering southern Italy but intimidated by the language, then Malta is worth a look. Of course we are talking about Southern Italy here, which is a world away from Northern Italy.
Puravida1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2020, 07:50 AM   #33
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Huntsville, AL/Helen, GA
Posts: 5,011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puravida1 View Post
Malta is a kind of English speaking version of Sicily. The food is similar and people are from a similar background. Its even more catholic than Rome. For much of its history Sicily and Malta had the same rulers. its only 50 miles south of Sicily and you can see Sicily from Malta on a clear day. The car ferry is less than 2 hours. Most of the stuff in the shops is from Italy. There is no crime like in Italy. So if your considering southern Italy but intimidated by the language, then Malta is worth a look. Of course we are talking about Southern Italy here, which is a world away from Northern Italy.
Heck, you can almost see Sicily from Malta.

I've been to Italy at least 10 times and also to Malta. Southern Italy's a very high unemployment area and much less desirable to travel in than from Rome north. The industrial Italy is from Torino to Milan and over toward Bologna.
Bamaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
We are retired with 5 young kids (actually just had a baby this week) Cossack Hi, I am... 27 07-05-2017 05:26 PM
Pre-packaged tours of Italy Jay_Gatsby Other topics 36 02-04-2006 11:18 AM
Italy - Mamma Mia, It's Like a Whole Other Country Danny Other topics 34 11-16-2005 11:42 AM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:49 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.