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Wow, I can't believe Im getting nervous. anyone else had this issue?
Old 03-09-2021, 09:23 AM   #1
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Wow, I can't believe Im getting nervous. anyone else had this issue?

Hello All,
about 6 years ago I got my "please go away nicely" letter for mega corp, so I decided to actually pursue a passion of mine (baking) and immediately got a part time gig at a local bakery. due to a new owner and covid, the job is not so nice now so I've decided to hang up my apron. I definitely won't miss the 4 am time card punch.

what's surprising me is my anxiety. this will be the first time in 47 years (I've worked at some thing since I was 13) that I have not had a paycheck and it's making me wacky.

Been playing in this sandbox for a while so I'm totally surprised that I'm feeling this way.

I've done my due diligence so I'm financially set. I'm one of the lucky few that still gets retiree healthcare from mega corp so not to much stress there. they look like they won't crash and burn within the next five years (when I'm eligible for medicaid) but you never know. lol

anyone else go through this?
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Old 03-09-2021, 09:31 AM   #2
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All the hours spent thinking about our post retirement financial situation and planning for retirement paid off for me. Honestly for me that uncomfortable feeling you mention lasted about 10 minutes after I left the office for the last time. I was relaxed before I even got home. I hope you enjoy your retirement as much as my wife and I have.
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Old 03-09-2021, 09:45 AM   #3
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I do understand your feeling and I have some of those empty feelings about no pay check life.

It maybe the frugalness, piling on more, uncertainty or just hard to spend your money you saved for all those years.

I would say do what makes YOU feel good. If it is to work and a pay check then you need to work.

As having those feeling you are having, is a common thing to some but not all. Sometimes trying something new and finding your way through retirement may not be for you if yo can't enjoy life.
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Old 03-09-2021, 09:52 AM   #4
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Your feelings are not unusual, but they shall pass. The joys that come in retirement will soon overcome any worries. Welcome to the club!
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Old 03-09-2021, 09:53 AM   #5
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Retirement is an irreversible decision for many. Regardless we all have some reservations, but how much varies from a lot to very little “nervous.” It’s perfectly normal, as none of us can predict the future and retirement is a LONG time for 90%+ of us...
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Old 03-09-2021, 09:54 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by bclover View Post

what's surprising me is my anxiety. this will be the first time in 47 years (I've worked at some thing since I was 13) that I have not had a paycheck and it's making me wacky.
I retired 16 years ago and still get a "paycheck" - actually, two of them. I set up an automatic withdrawal from Vanguard to take 1/12 of my annual RMD each month. SS also sends me a monthly paycheck.

Almost as much $ as I was getting before I retired, without all than pesky irritation from having to get up and go to work.
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Old 03-09-2021, 10:01 AM   #7
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Yes, I do understand and I came here with the same question a few years ago. I, too, have worked off and on (on call at my previous employer). Last year was the first year that I did not work, and I was amazed at how much less stress I had--workwise.
Retirement is wonderful! Perhaps, like REWahoo, you could set up a monthly deposit like a paycheck, if that would help.
If you really want to work, you will find another part time job, IF that is what you want.
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Old 03-09-2021, 10:08 AM   #8
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I retired 16 years ago and still get a "paycheck" - actually, two of them. I set up an automatic withdrawal from Vanguard to take 1/12 of my annual RMD each month. SS also sends me a monthly paycheck.
+1. I hadn’t thought about how I’ll do RMD’s but that sounds like a good approach, monthly or quarterly. So in about 4 years I’ll have three automatic “incomes” - Soc Sec, RMD’s and dividends (approx quarterly). I’ve had to think about income for 9 years, it’ll be nice to go on automatic!
The only thing I’ll have to think about then is taxes.
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Old 03-09-2021, 10:44 AM   #9
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My neighbor stopped me yesterday and we shot the breeze for a while. He asked me how I made the adjustment from a w*rking stiff to active retiree. He informed me that he retired at 77 on March 1st, and doesn't know what to do with himself. No hobbies or deep interests; he has much anxiety. As someone who still can't find enough day to do everything I want to do in a day, I didn't know where to begin. I asked if he wanted to be my helper on several of my projects, but he declined.

Don't let yourself become him.
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Old 03-09-2021, 12:23 PM   #10
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I am celebrating 9 months of being gainfully unemployed (DW is just shy of 6 months). I completely understand your nervousness. Logically, I know that DW and I are very secure. We have a pension that covers our basic needs and a healthy portfolio that more than covers the rest. But as I am still in my first year of retirement, I still find myself checking stocks, going over budgets and having some anxiety about "did we do the right thing pulling the plug?" It is natural. I think it is how I got here to begin with. Income = Security. Now you just have to change your mindset to realize it is okay to spend that nest egg.
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Old 03-09-2021, 01:22 PM   #11
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Old 03-09-2021, 01:44 PM   #12
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My neighbor stopped me yesterday and we shot the breeze for a while. He asked me how I made the adjustment from a w*rking stiff to active retiree. He informed me that he retired at 77 on March 1st, and doesn't know what to do with himself. No hobbies or deep interests; he has much anxiety. As someone who still can't find enough day to do everything I want to do in a day, I didn't know where to begin. I asked if he wanted to be my helper on several of my projects, but he declined.

Don't let yourself become him.
Amen! I had colleagues like that. Time to start working on hobbies, or pick some. It's such a big world- there is so much to see and do.
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Old 03-09-2021, 03:12 PM   #13
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My neighbor stopped me yesterday and we shot the breeze for a while. He asked me how I made the adjustment from a w*rking stiff to active retiree. He informed me that he retired at 77 on March 1st, and doesn't know what to do with himself. No hobbies or deep interests; he has much anxiety. As someone who still can't find enough day to do everything I want to do in a day, I didn't know where to begin. I asked if he wanted to be my helper on several of my projects, but he declined.

Don't let yourself become him.
One of my friends retired with no hobbies other than golf. Golf season around here only lasts from May to September. It's not working out well for him...plans of 4 or 5 times a week golfing became 2 or 3 times a month because he got lazy and probably a little depressed. He's also single and has no one to spend time with. Covid didn't help his social situation and he sits around his apartment all day with nowhere to go and no one to see.
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Old 03-09-2021, 04:21 PM   #14
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You've already done your due diligence and have made certain the numbers make sense. I would suggest a quick inventory of your back-ups to your retirement plan. The "if this, then I'll do that." If Megacorp reneges on it's 5 year plan to help you fund your health insurance, you'll cut back on one trip per year and one meal out per week to fund your equivalent ACA medical insurance plan. If the roof starts to leak, you'll take from your 6-month or 1-year cash stash and rebuild your cash over the next year by cutting back on expensive wine (go with boxed or Costco's finest.) If the car breaks down, use the other car between the two of you until your cash fund can swing the repairs.

Play a few "what if" games until you KNOW that you've covered most things that can go wrong. Don't worry about the asteroid with your name on it - think how famous you'd be.

I think your anxiety is normal. As much as anything, after 47 years of w*rking, just the thought of NOT w*rking may be unsettling to you. Just go with it and play whatever mental game you need to make yourself feel "okay" with your new freedom. Remember, you can always find another j*b - even if it's showing up the slackers at McDonalds. As always, YMMV.
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Old 03-09-2021, 05:05 PM   #15
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Your nervousness is perfectly normal!

Retirement is considered a "major life event" and as such, it entails a certain amount of stress and anxiety (even when it is viewed overall as a positive event).

Think about graduating - starting a new job- buying a house - getting married - having a baby or [insert any other happy event/life change here].

All of these things can be both hoped-for and desired, while at the same time bringing a certain amount of stress. Change of any kind is stressful for humans, and retirement is a big change!

I can relate to your feelings. I w#rked for 48 years, and I fully believed that I would skip out of my job at the end of 2020 without a care in the world, and without a backward glance, let alone any second-guessing of my decision.

To my amazement, it really took until March 1st (when my third monthly pension payment dropped) for me to actually stop "holding my breath" figuratively speaking. Now, of course, I can barely remember the w#rk world, and most days I can't remember what day it is. I can still remember my name (so far) so I'm not worried.

You will be fine!! Just be aware that initially it may feel "weird" or "not normal" not to be working - but those feelings will pass!

Good luck to you.

ETA: I look forward to you posting in six months' time that you can't believe you ever worried about taking the plunge!
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Old 03-09-2021, 10:27 PM   #16
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I didn't have those feelings, but they are common. I did mine in more of a 'phased' approach...happened so slowly it was like cooking a lobster...that I didn't even notice. And actually, I still do handyman work about 200 hours/year...but I only take jobs for NICE people and if anyone tries to give me any crap I just turn them down lol. It's a great situation to be in.

I'm sure you'll require an adjustment period...my wife quit cold turkey and it took her about 14 months. Not saying you'll take that long...much depends on how social you are, what hobbies you have, and so on. Congrats!
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Old 03-10-2021, 05:44 AM   #17
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Your feelings are not unusual, but they shall pass. The joys that come in retirement will soon overcome any worries. Welcome to the club!
+1 just normal feelings. Come on in the water is warm. I assume you meant Medicare and not Medicaid.
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Old 03-10-2021, 05:47 AM   #18
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I can understand the worry about giving up a steady paycheck. Even if you can afford it on your own, it's hard to give up that security. I'm in a similar position myself. All the calculations I've run say that I can afford to retire, but it's hard to give up that paycheck, and make the switch from saving up resources, to spending them down.

But, as others have said who have done it, it's probably a momentary feeling. My guess is that it's sort of like trying to get into a swimming pool for the first time of the season (for those who live in cooler areas where they can't keep them open year round). There's that momentary reluctance. You finally work up the courage to dip a toe in, and it feels cold. But then once you plunge in and get used to it, you realize the water's fine, and you wonder why you didn't do it sooner!
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Old 03-10-2021, 06:38 AM   #19
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I think it’s perfectly normal to feel anxiety with any major life change. Even if you know the numbers are right, and the time feels right, there is uncertainty involved. Hope all goes well!
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Old 03-10-2021, 07:05 AM   #20
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+1 just normal feelings. Come on in the water is warm. I assume you meant Medicare and not Medicaid.
LOL,
Thanks Dtail. always did get the two switched. lol has my smart allecky niece calls it, health insurance for old people
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