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Old 02-01-2020, 08:18 AM   #2841
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Originally Posted by Time2 View Post
We had the older style extension spring break while we were in the the living room. It made a heck of a noise and were both looking at each other wondering "what was that"?
I bent a new hook on the spring and it worked another 10 years until we had a hurricane that damaged the door.
Wow, that’s what I call “out-moneymoustaching Mr Money Moustache”.
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Old 02-01-2020, 08:29 AM   #2842
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShokWaveRider View Post
Replaced and adjusted Garage Door Torsion Springs. Had to Make some Turn bars out of 1/2" Steel rod ($8 from Home Depot). Had to measure the existing springs and order new ones, then had to install and test them.

Why? My neighbor had one snap/break, our homes are about the same age, ~17 years. Cost him $607 to replace them and repair the damage caused by the spring breaking during an open cycle, the opener broke and pulled a support strut off the door.

Garage Torsion springs have a 10,000 cycle average life, that is about 9 years with 3 cycles per day.

So I thought I would do some preventative maintenance. Adjusted the door closing/opening force and height at the same time.

Total Cost including springs, center bearing and tension rods = $75! This 66 year old patted himself on the back for this one.
Very well done!


This reminds me that I had to replace my second garage door opener a couple of weeks ago. We moved into our brand new 2 garage door house 30 years ago. After about 12 years, one of the two openers broke. I figured the other one would probably break soon too, so I took advantage of a sale at Sears and bought two new openers. I installed the first one and just stored the 2nd new one in the back of the garage. Well, it took another 18 years for the second one to break....!!! But finally, I got to install it! Works like a charm - AND it is FINALLY out of my way in the back of the garage.
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Old 02-01-2020, 08:42 AM   #2843
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The hardest part with the torsion springs is that when both springs are unwound and loose, the cables want to slip of the end pullies. I wound each one 5 turns to provide a little tension, but allowed me to turn the torsion bar by hand, all 17' of it, just enough to slip the cables back onto the pullies and then I continued tensioning each spring till I got to MY calculated turn ratio of 28 x 1/4 turns (7 full turns). When they are correct you should be able to lift the door to about half way, and it should stay there. Then it is "balanced".

I wonder how many folk here would attempt such a repair vs hire it out? I would rate it about an 8 out of 10 for difficulty level, mainly because you have to be VERY careful doing it. Those torsion spring adjustment bars will only need to slip off once to cause you and perhaps the door very serious damage. Anyone see a Poll coming...
I replaced side springs.myself a few times but after I switched over to torsion springs, I decided to leave that part to the pros. The amount of energy stored in the fully wound springs scares me too much....
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Old 02-01-2020, 05:11 PM   #2844
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The amount of energy stored in the fully wound springs scares me too much....
That's my take on it too. I'm about 99% sure I could install and wind them, but there's a 1% that I want nothing to do with being a part of.

Like the bomb squad guy said "You only get to say 'Oops' one time...."
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Old 02-01-2020, 05:36 PM   #2845
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Replaced a circulation pump on the downstairs heat zone for the second time in 3 months. Came home the other day and it was 57 degrees in the house. Opened it up and found the terminal board where the wires connect to the motor was burned looking.. Was a little skeptical about the plumbing supply place giving me a warranty replacement but they did.

Grateful that the guy who built our house (and lived here) was quite OCD and all of the systems are laid out very well. 4 bolts and about a 15 minute swap with electrical and all.....
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Your recent repair?
Old 02-01-2020, 05:48 PM   #2846
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Your recent repair?

Our water had a sulfur smell when turning on a hot water faucet. We are on well water. We just had an iron curtain water treatment system installed, and the dealer come to check the system. He suspected the water heater. My online research seemed to verify the water heater as the culprit, specifically the anode.

I found online that replacing an anode with a powered anode will eliminate sulfur smell. So I shut down the water heater, turned off the water, and drained the water heater.

Trouble began when I couldnít get the existing anode out of the water heater, even with an 8í cheater bar connected to the socket ratchet.

So I refilled the water heater, and turned it on while I regrouped. But now the sulfur smell is gone. So I have a fix - at least temporarily. Iíll need an impact driver for when I decide to take the anode out next time.
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Old 02-02-2020, 08:23 AM   #2847
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Originally Posted by euro View Post
Wow, thatís what I call ďout-moneymoustaching Mr Money MoustacheĒ.

I'm not sure if you mean because I was to tight to buy a new spring or if you thing it was hard to bend the spring, I had to heat it to make the hook.
It is just me, to figure out if I can fix it rather than replace it.
I will ad, after the hurricane we had a new door installed and the new door is soooo quiet compared to the old one. I joked with the installers that they had to make it more noisy so I'll know when my wife tries to sneak out!
It is nice to have it so quiet while opening.
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Old 03-05-2020, 06:16 PM   #2848
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Woke up to wife saying there's no water. Checked and found no hot or cold. Heard some water winning in the basement. Feared the worst. Found the water heater was leaking like crazy, faster than the well pump could keep up with. There's a floor drain near the water heater so no flooded basement. Wife wanted to call a plumber. This old DIY person is not ready to give up yet, but I'm beyond wanting to wrestle a water heater up and down the stairs to the basement. Got one phone quote from a plumber, about $925, but for a shorter 6y guarantee WH. We're replacing a 8 year Richmond gas WH that has lasted 26 years.
Checked Menards. They have a 9y Richmond of similar size. Cost me $110 for delivery to the basement and take away the old WH. There's a 11% rebate on the before tax total and I get to use my $80 worth or rebates from previous purchases. $520 went on my charge card. I'll get $50 back from Menards, 2% back from my charge card. It will work out to about $460.
I got the old heater drained and out of position, and all the reusable fitting off of it, a fan running to dry up the floor and the new WH comes tomorrow
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Old 03-05-2020, 08:04 PM   #2849
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatguy View Post
Woke up to wife saying there's no water. Checked and found no hot or cold. Heard some water winning in the basement. Feared the worst. Found the water heater was leaking like crazy, faster than the well pump could keep up with. There's a floor drain near the water heater so no flooded basement. Wife wanted to call a plumber. This old DIY person is not ready to give up yet, but I'm beyond wanting to wrestle a water heater up and down the stairs to the basement. Got one phone quote from a plumber, about $925, but for a shorter 6y guarantee WH. We're replacing a 8 year Richmond gas WH that has lasted 26 years.
Checked Menards. They have a 9y Richmond of similar size. Cost me $110 for delivery to the basement and take away the old WH. There's a 11% rebate on the before tax total and I get to use my $80 worth or rebates from previous purchases. $520 went on my charge card. I'll get $50 back from Menards, 2% back from my charge card. It will work out to about $460.
I got the old heater drained and out of position, and all the reusable fitting off of it, a fan running to dry up the floor and the new WH comes tomorrow


Good for you! I replace my water heaters. I always manage to make it take a few hours longer than necessary sweating pipes, etc, but not something Iím ready to pay for.
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Old 03-05-2020, 08:05 PM   #2850
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
Our water had a sulfur smell when turning on a hot water faucet. We are on well water. We just had an iron curtain water treatment system installed, and the dealer come to check the system. He suspected the water heater. My online research seemed to verify the water heater as the culprit, specifically the anode.

I found online that replacing an anode with a powered anode will eliminate sulfur smell. So I shut down the water heater, turned off the water, and drained the water heater.

Trouble began when I couldnít get the existing anode out of the water heater, even with an 8í cheater bar connected to the socket ratchet.

So I refilled the water heater, and turned it on while I regrouped. But now the sulfur smell is gone. So I have a fix - at least temporarily. Iíll need an impact driver for when I decide to take the anode out next time.


Changing to an aluminum rod (available at HD) can also make big difference - if you can get old out!
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Old 03-05-2020, 08:09 PM   #2851
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatguy View Post
Woke up to wife saying there's no water. Checked and found no hot or cold. Heard some water winning in the basement. Feared the worst. Found the water heater was leaking like crazy, faster than the well pump could keep up with. There's a floor drain near the water heater so no flooded basement. Wife wanted to call a plumber. This old DIY person is not ready to give up yet, but I'm beyond wanting to wrestle a water heater up and down the stairs to the basement. Got one phone quote from a plumber, about $925, but for a shorter 6y guarantee WH. We're replacing a 8 year Richmond gas WH that has lasted 26 years.
Checked Menards. They have a 9y Richmond of similar size. Cost me $110 for delivery to the basement and take away the old WH. There's a 11% rebate on the before tax total and I get to use my $80 worth or rebates from previous purchases. $520 went on my charge card. I'll get $50 back from Menards, 2% back from my charge card. It will work out to about $460.
I got the old heater drained and out of position, and all the reusable fitting off of it, a fan running to dry up the floor and the new WH comes tomorrow
I did a similar repair but it was over 15 years ago. Hope the water heater will last a few more years before needing another replacement.

A few things to keep in mind... a long-time plumber told me to flush the water heater twice a year. I've done it probably once a year. Really should put it on a schedule/calendar. He suggested turning on the drain valve fully and let it run for several minutes to allow the water rushing into the tank to stir any debris and allow it to run out of the drain line. Made sense.
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Old 03-05-2020, 08:14 PM   #2852
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DW called me last Friday to say the clutch had broken on our 1984 Jeep CJ-7. She was able to pull off the main road (very busy at that time of day) and I drove over as quickly as possible to check on her and the vehicle. I suspected it was not the actual clutch but the clutch linkage. A quick inspection indicated the clutch rod had broken. Good (sort of) better than the actual clutch!

A few phone calls and I found a repair kit for the entire bellcrank assembly was available through Summit Racing and they have a warehouse within driving distance of our house. $75 and 4 hours the later the Jeep was back on the road.
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Old 03-05-2020, 08:35 PM   #2853
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Good for you! I replace my water heaters. I always manage to make it take a few hours longer than necessary sweating pipes, etc, but not something Iím ready to pay for.
I replaced my tank last winter and at the time ran PEX. No more sweating pipes and it takes just a couple minutes to make the connections the next time you have to replace the tank.
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Old 03-05-2020, 08:44 PM   #2854
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nvestysly View Post
DW called me last Friday to say the clutch had broken on our 1984 Jeep CJ-7. She was able to pull off the main road (very busy at that time of day) and I drove over as quickly as possible to check on her and the vehicle. I suspected it was not the actual clutch but the clutch linkage. A quick inspection indicated the clutch rod had broken. Good (sort of) better than the actual clutch!

A few phone calls and I found a repair kit for the entire bellcrank assembly was available through Summit Racing and they have a warehouse within driving distance of our house. $75 and 4 hours the later the Jeep was back on the road.
Nice job! I love Summit! I have bought a lot of auto parts/accessories from them over the years.
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Old 03-05-2020, 08:57 PM   #2855
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I just replaced the contacts in the starter solenoid of my 97 Toyota T-100.
Wife reported sometimes it clicks, before it will start. I ordered the parts and waited to verify the problem. About 2 weeks passed and then it happened to me. This was the 3rd time I've replaced them in 20 years. Mostly a short trip vehicle, so lots of starts. but only 117k miles.
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Old 03-06-2020, 06:34 PM   #2856
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Iíll need an impact driver for when I decide to take the anode out next time.
I just got one of those and a set of impact sockets a few days ago in anticipation of changing out the anode rod on a regular basis. About five months ago we bought the third water heater in 17 years here, including the one that came with the house. That lasted ten years. The second one only lasted six years, just beyond the warranty, so that got me to do some reading about water heaters. With back, knee, and shoulder issues my days of wrestling water heaters in and out of place are long gone and the $1,400 for a new gas water heater, installed, got my attention.

As an aside, if you haven't bought a gas water heater recently get ready for some sticker shock. The newer ones have changes to the combustion chamber to help prevent flames ignited by the burner, such as gasoline fumes on the floor, from escaping back into the room. That's the theory anyway. Here's an explanation: What is Different About FVIR Water Heaters? | The ASHI Reporter | Inspection News & Views from the American Society of Home Inspectors

It turns out water heater maintenance wasn't a big deal where we used to live because the water was naturally soft and they lasted 20+ years as a matter of course. That is not the case here, where we have hard water and therefor also run a water softener, which adds corrosive salt to the water, hence our six-year water heater. (BTW, the "12-year warranty" heaters have either two anode rods or an extra-thick one installed when new.)

There are lots of youtube videos on how to replace an anode and almost all of them emphasize how hard it is to get one out if it's been in place for a number of years, and techniques involve 4-foot cheater bars and lashing the heater to the wall to keep it from rotating. Yikes! No wonder nobody wants to change it. Many people recommend against using an impact wrench because of concern about damaging the porcelain liner but I found no empirical information from water heater manufacturers either pro or con except one. A.O. Smith, who made the heater in our basement, actually recommends using an impact wrench to loosen the anode, and then use a regular ratchet wrench to finish removing it. When I found that (which of course I can't find again or I'd post the link) I called the company to confirm it, which a representative did.

So now I have a schedule posted on the water heater as to when it is to be flushed, and the anode replaced. The plumber who installed it suggested the anode be replaced, or at least checked, every two years. The manual says check at six months and annually thereafter. I'll start at flushing at six-month intervals (and have a new valve and pipe wrench handy, since they don't always want to fully close again). The anode I'll check annually until I get a feel for how long it lasts, which I suspect won't be long given the longevity of the last water heater.

Anyway, here's a photo of the model 2767 1/2" impact wrench from Milwaukee that advertises 1,400 ft/lbs of torque. I figure after replacing two anode rods I'll be ahead of the game vs. paying a plumber to do it. And hopefully I'll get to keep this water heater for 20+ years. It seems the standard size for the nut on top of the anode is 1 1/6". No one mentioned a different size.

Oh, and at Home Depot a new anode is ~$14.00 and up. There are also powered anode rods that supposedly don't need replacing because they're not sacrificial. I'm thinking about that but have more reading to do. Also, I discovered that there is such a thing as food grade anti-seize which I intend to use when I do change out the anode rod.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Super-Lu...8008/304709597
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Old 03-06-2020, 06:59 PM   #2857
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Iíve seen a bunch of you tube anode removal horror videos also. First I bought a powered anode rod. Then I tried taking the old rod out using an 8í cheater bar and the rod wouldnít budge. It did start to rotate the water heater so I stopped. I turned the water back on went out and bought an impact driver. Havenít tried it yet.

It seems like the sulfur smell is gone or at least less than before. And DW is not complaining about it. So Iím waiting to attack this again maybe next month or whenever she complains about sulfur smell.
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Old 03-06-2020, 07:15 PM   #2858
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Good for you! I replace my water heaters. I always manage to make it take a few hours longer than necessary sweating pipes, etc, but not something Iím ready to pay for.

Check out Sharkbite fittings. No sweat(ing).
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Old 03-07-2020, 07:10 AM   #2859
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Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
I just got one of those and a set of impact sockets a few days ago in anticipation of changing out the anode rod on a regular basis. About five months ago we bought the third water heater in 17 years here, including the one that came with the house. That lasted ten years. The second one only lasted six years, just beyond the warranty, so that got me to do some reading about water heaters. With back, knee, and shoulder issues my days of wrestling water heaters in and out of place are long gone and the $1,400 for a new gas water heater, installed, got my attention.

As an aside, if you haven't bought a gas water heater recently get ready for some sticker shock. The newer ones have changes to the combustion chamber to help prevent flames ignited by the burner, such as gasoline fumes on the floor, from escaping back into the room. That's the theory anyway. Here's an explanation: What is Different About FVIR Water Heaters? | The ASHI Reporter | Inspection News & Views from the American Society of Home Inspectors

It turns out water heater maintenance wasn't a big deal where we used to live because the water was naturally soft and they lasted 20+ years as a matter of course. That is not the case here, where we have hard water and therefor also run a water softener, which adds corrosive salt to the water, hence our six-year water heater. (BTW, the "12-year warranty" heaters have either two anode rods or an extra-thick one installed when new.)

There are lots of youtube videos on how to replace an anode and almost all of them emphasize how hard it is to get one out if it's been in place for a number of years, and techniques involve 4-foot cheater bars and lashing the heater to the wall to keep it from rotating. Yikes! No wonder nobody wants to change it. Many people recommend against using an impact wrench because of concern about damaging the porcelain liner but I found no empirical information from water heater manufacturers either pro or con except one. A.O. Smith, who made the heater in our basement, actually recommends using an impact wrench to loosen the anode, and then use a regular ratchet wrench to finish removing it. When I found that (which of course I can't find again or I'd post the link) I called the company to confirm it, which a representative did.

So now I have a schedule posted on the water heater as to when it is to be flushed, and the anode replaced. The plumber who installed it suggested the anode be replaced, or at least checked, every two years. The manual says check at six months and annually thereafter. I'll start at flushing at six-month intervals (and have a new valve and pipe wrench handy, since they don't always want to fully close again). The anode I'll check annually until I get a feel for how long it lasts, which I suspect won't be long given the longevity of the last water heater.

Anyway, here's a photo of the model 2767 1/2" impact wrench from Milwaukee that advertises 1,400 ft/lbs of torque. I figure after replacing two anode rods I'll be ahead of the game vs. paying a plumber to do it. And hopefully I'll get to keep this water heater for 20+ years. It seems the standard size for the nut on top of the anode is 1 1/6". No one mentioned a different size.

Oh, and at Home Depot a new anode is ~$14.00 and up. There are also powered anode rods that supposedly don't need replacing because they're not sacrificial. I'm thinking about that but have more reading to do. Also, I discovered that there is such a thing as food grade anti-seize which I intend to use when I do change out the anode rod.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Super-Lu...8008/304709597


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Old 03-07-2020, 08:18 AM   #2860
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Anyway, here's a photo of the model 2767 1/2" impact wrench from Milwaukee that advertises 1,400 ft/lbs of torque. I figure after replacing two anode rods I'll be ahead of the game vs. paying a plumber to do it. And hopefully I'll get to keep this water heater for 20+ years. It seems the standard size for the nut on top of the anode is 1 1/6". No one mentioned a different size.
Good luck holding on to that at full power. Based on the pic, if it slips out of your grip it may spin into the water line and probably end up snapping it.
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