Join Early Retirement Today
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-07-2020, 08:22 AM   #2861
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
euro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazz4cash View Post
Any excuse to buy a new tool.
Exactly!
euro is offline  
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 03-07-2020, 08:52 AM   #2862
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 39
I had no luck trying to remove my anode rod using an impact wrench. My water heater is a 12 year unit that is currently on its 15th year. I plan to have food-grade anti-seize placed on the threads for the next unit when I replace it one day.

I'm curious if you need to pull a permit to do any plumbing work in your area? In Mass, all plumbing work needs to be done by a licensed plumber so technically I'm not suppose to change my own water heater. The only exception to this rule are "repairs".

I've done my own work a number of times but have also hired the plumber for other work.
bbqcoder is offline  
Old 03-07-2020, 09:35 AM   #2863
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Out-to-Lunch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 1,299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
A.O. Smith, who made the heater in our basement, actually recommends using an impact wrench to loosen the anode, and then use a regular ratchet wrench to finish removing it.


Anyway, here's a photo of the model 2767 1/2" impact wrench from Milwaukee that advertises 1,400 ft/lbs of torque.

Using a Milwaukee impact wrench on an A.O. Smith water heater! Can't get any more Milwaukee than that unless you were drinking a Miller at the same time!
Out-to-Lunch is offline  
Old 03-07-2020, 09:47 AM   #2864
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
...

It seems like the sulfur smell is gone or at least less than before. And DW is not complaining about it. So I’m waiting to attack this again maybe next month or whenever she complains about sulfur smell.
Is this on a private well? I finally got around to chlorine-shocking my well, and the sulfur smell has gone away. We didn't have the smell with the old water heater (anode rod gone long ago - like others, I couldn't get the old one out, so just let it be - that water heater was still working some 26 years later). But the smell came when we got a new water heater, and was less when I had them replace the anode, but still fairly strong.

Been 6 months since I shocked the well, no odor.

-ERD50
ERD50 is online now  
Old 03-07-2020, 11:12 AM   #2865
Moderator Emeritus
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 13,545
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
Is this on a private well? I finally got around to chlorine-shocking my well, and the sulfur smell has gone away. We didn't have the smell with the old water heater (anode rod gone long ago - like others, I couldn't get the old one out, so just let it be - that water heater was still working some 26 years later). But the smell came when we got a new water heater, and was less when I had them replace the anode, but still fairly strong.

Been 6 months since I shocked the well, no odor.

-ERD50
Yes - private well. But the smell is only from the hot faucets. And really only noticeable in the last few months since I put in a new water heater.

I shocked the well about 5 years ago. I figured that maybe I should do it again. But last time the well guy recommended that I run the water afterward and discharge the water outside. So I ran a hose from pressure tank piping out the back door for about 24 hours. Maybe the well guy wanted to avoid overloading the septic system.

I'm not doing that in this weather. Did you do a similar mega-discharge?
Ronstar is offline  
Old 03-07-2020, 11:45 AM   #2866
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
Yes - private well. But the smell is only from the hot faucets. And really only noticeable in the last few months since I put in a new water heater.

I shocked the well about 5 years ago. I figured that maybe I should do it again. But last time the well guy recommended that I run the water afterward and discharge the water outside. So I ran a hose from pressure tank piping out the back door for about 24 hours. Maybe the well guy wanted to avoid overloading the septic system.

I'm not doing that in this weather. Did you do a similar mega-discharge?
The sulfur odor was only on hot for us too, it seems to be an interaction with something in the water (iron bacteria?) and the anode rod. Never noticed it on the cold water, ever.

Yes, you need to discharge it to keep a high does of bleach out of your septic. It shouldn't take 24 hours though. I ended up using more bleach than they seemed to indicate, (but then I read that interaction with the iron does require higher doses). So it took a while to get the odor down. I bought some test strips for pools, and IIRC, had to dilute it at first to get it in range of the strip. Once I got it down to about 2 ppm, I didn't worry about the septic, as that is normal municipal rates, and lots of people have municipal water with septic.

I'm thinking of doing a low dose every 6 months or so in the future. Dilute it in a 5 G bucket, calculate enough to bring it to 2 ppm, and just let it circulate back to the well for a while to get it mixed, and then just let it dissipate over time. It just means we'd have a municipal level of chlorine in the house, reducing over the course of a day until it all gets replaced/diluted. I think I calculated that to be just a cup of bleach or so, but I need to check.

-ERD50
ERD50 is online now  
Old 03-07-2020, 04:21 PM   #2867
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 22,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbqcoder View Post
I'm curious if you need to pull a permit to do any plumbing work in your area? In Mass, all plumbing work needs to be done by a licensed plumber so technically I'm not suppose to change my own water heater. The only exception to this rule are "repairs".
Homeowners are allowed to do their own installations and plumbing. In reality, they're going to do it anyway so trying to regulate that is foolish. And if it blows up or asphyxiates them, that's further proof some people exist to serve as examples to others.

Here's an example from the Water Heater Rescue Closet of Horrors, a site I stumbled across in my quest for information about water heaters. Anyone who knows even a little bit about water heaters will just shake their head about it. They have other examples just as bad.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg PluggedTP.jpg (48.6 KB, 226 views)
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline  
Old 03-07-2020, 06:53 PM   #2868
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: the prairies
Posts: 3,541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
Yes - private well. But the smell is only from the hot faucets. And really only noticeable in the last few months since I put in a new water heater.
Smelly hot water from wells is a common problem. Shocking the well rarely works long term. I used to have that but once I removed the anode rod the smelly water went away immediately and never returned.
Music Lover is offline  
Old 03-08-2020, 05:19 AM   #2869
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 253
“Sacrificial” Anode rods serve a purpose. Suggest switching to aluminum before removing completely.

Contact OhioPureWater if you have other odors or issues with water quality. They are great at remote diagnostics and recommendations for DIY’s. I’m not affiliated. Just a happy customer.
WhenIsItTime is offline  
Old 03-08-2020, 01:37 PM   #2870
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 86
We've had smelly water off and on. I thought it had something to do with how the water softener was working. The water heater I just replaced was, I think, the original from when the house was built in 1994. So like 25 years old, so I'm not gonna be concerned about replacing anodes for longevity.
There some thing about installing an aluminum-zinc anode to fix the smelly water but there's some issue about the aluminum-zink anode with a water softener.
A powered anode looks like an answer, but the ones I see online appear to be powered by cheap wall wart power supplies. Looks too easy for the anode power supply to fail and go unnoticed until the water heated fails prematurely.
My new WH has been in 3 days and the water doesn't stink yet. I'm gonna wait & see.
thatguy is online now  
Old 03-08-2020, 03:51 PM   #2871
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 22,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by thatguy View Post
A powered anode looks like an answer, but the ones I see online appear to be powered by cheap wall wart power supplies. Looks too easy for the anode power supply to fail and go unnoticed until the water heated fails prematurely.
I have the same reservation about a powered anode and found this one on Amazon and other sources, but the best price I've found is Amazon. Same deal with the wall wart, but it also has an audible alarm if it fails. One reviewer wrote that he did have one fail and the manufacturer promptly replaced the wall wart with no hassles.

They cost about $20-$30 more than the others without an alarm but for a one-off every 20 or so years I'd pay that premium.

https://www.amazon.com/100305721-Rel...3703812&sr=8-5
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline  
Old 03-09-2020, 10:12 AM   #2872
Recycles dryer sheets
NateW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
Homeowners are allowed to do their own installations and plumbing. In reality, they're going to do it anyway so trying to regulate that is foolish. And if it blows up or asphyxiates them, that's further proof some people exist to serve as examples to others.

Here's an example from the Water Heater Rescue Closet of Horrors, a site I stumbled across in my quest for information about water heaters. Anyone who knows even a little bit about water heaters will just shake their head about it. They have other examples just as bad.
That scary picture of a sized temperature-pressure relief valve (aka safety valve) looks just like the one that was in the water heater in my son's townhouse when he bought it. Upon seeing it I operated the lever and absolutely nothing came out. The home inspector never checked it my son said. The water is exceptionally hard where he lives. My son and I replaced it right away and it was calcified shut. Also drained what looked to several pounds of thick calcium carbonate goo from the water heater. You are supposed to check the operation of the safety valves yearly by opening them briefly and purging a quart or so of water from them.

Then, several months later when DW and I bought a house in the same geographic area and had a prepurchase inspection. I asked the inspector to check the water heater temperature-pressure relief valve and his response was, "we don't check those because they usually leak after the lever is operated.". We have a water softener so the water heater had no deposits in it and the safety valve works fine (I ended up checking it).

Google on "water heater explosions" and you will find plenty of videos of the carnage left behind when the pressure-temperature relief valve fails to open when the thermostat malfunctions and sticks "on" preventing the heating elements or gas burner from shutting off. Sometimes the malfunctioning water heater launches right through the roof!
NateW is offline  
Old 03-09-2020, 10:29 AM   #2873
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 1,631
Quote:
Originally Posted by NateW View Post
That scary picture of a sized temperature-pressure relief valve (aka safety valve) looks just like the one that was in the water heater in my son's townhouse when he bought it. Upon seeing it I operated the lever and absolutely nothing came out. The home inspector never checked it my son said. The water is exceptionally hard where he lives. My son and I replaced it right away and it was calcified shut. Also drained what looked to several pounds of thick calcium carbonate goo from the water heater. You are supposed to check the operation of the safety valves yearly by opening them briefly and purging a quart or so of water from them.

Then, several months later when DW and I bought a house in the same geographic area and had a prepurchase inspection. I asked the inspector to check the water heater temperature-pressure relief valve and his response was, "we don't check those because they usually leak after the lever is operated.". We have a water softener so the water heater had no deposits in it and the safety valve works fine (I ended up checking it).

Google on "water heater explosions" and you will find plenty of videos of the carnage left behind when the pressure-temperature relief valve fails to open when the thermostat malfunctions and sticks "on" preventing the heating elements or gas burner from shutting off. Sometimes the malfunctioning water heater launches right through the roof!

MythBusters showed some amazing water heater explosions.
Time2 is offline  
Old 03-09-2020, 10:45 AM   #2874
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fair Lawn
Posts: 2,253
Not quite a repair, but I'm still proud of this DIY job: We had our entry door replaced. But the door has a fancy-shmantzy door lock, that requires a special doohickey tool to remove. I had the tool, but couldn't find it. So the installer replaced the door, installed the deadbolt, and left me the old door with that lock still attached.
A short while later I found that tool. Start to finish, it took all of a half-hour to remove the lock and put it into the new door. This had all the earmarks of a successful DIY: 1) Project completed 2) Completed promptly and 3) Never uttered the F word.
mystang52 is online now  
Old 03-09-2020, 03:31 PM   #2875
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 22,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Time2 View Post
MythBusters showed some amazing water heater explosions.
Yes, here's a couple:

Explosion at 1:26



Explosion at 1:39

__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline  
Old 03-09-2020, 03:58 PM   #2876
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
euro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by NateW View Post
That scary picture of a sized temperature-pressure relief valve (aka safety valve) looks just like the one that was in the water heater in my son's townhouse when he bought it. Upon seeing it I operated the lever and absolutely nothing came out. The home inspector never checked it my son said. The water is exceptionally hard where he lives. My son and I replaced it right away and it was calcified shut. Also drained what looked to several pounds of thick calcium carbonate goo from the water heater. You are supposed to check the operation of the safety valves yearly by opening them briefly and purging a quart or so of water from them.

Then, several months later when DW and I bought a house in the same geographic area and had a prepurchase inspection. I asked the inspector to check the water heater temperature-pressure relief valve and his response was, "we don't check those because they usually leak after the lever is operated.". We have a water softener so the water heater had no deposits in it and the safety valve works fine (I ended up checking it).
What you say is true, but what the inspector said is also the case very often. If someone neglects to occasionally service (use) the valve (and I will bet that 90%+ of all the valves are NEVER "exercised"), then chances are very good that it will leak when you open it for the first time after, say, 10 years of just sitting there. How do I know? I have had to replace that valve (or the entire heater) in the majority of my rental properties immediately, or within the first 6 months of ownership...
So, given that, I don't blame the inspector - he doesn't want to be help liable by the seller for fixing the valve. I bet he learned that the hard way....
euro is offline  
Old 03-10-2020, 06:43 PM   #2877
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Laurel, MD
Posts: 5,976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Time2 View Post
MythBusters showed some amazing water heater explosions.


https://youtu.be/9bU-I2ZiML0



https://www.ispot.tv/ad/7IpN/allstat...m-water-heater
__________________
...with no reasonable expectation for ER, I'm just here auditing the AP class.Retired 8/1/15.
jazz4cash is online now  
Old 03-10-2020, 07:52 PM   #2878
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
Yes, here's a couple:

Explosion at 1:26



Explosion at 1:39

While of course they disabled the safety valve, and had to have also disabled the thermostat to do this, I wonder if there is something else going on for more drama?

They mention 300 PSI. At that pressure, water boils at over 400 °F. Can you get the water that hot to explode?

https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/b...ter-d_926.html

I really wonder if that in addition to everything else, they also only had a couple gallons of water in the water heater. It would be easier to heat that small amount of water to boiling, and the space above filled with compressible steam would capture that huge amount of kinetic energy. Water itself is basically in-compressible, so if it were filled with water, there would not be that "wound up spring" effect of stored energy.

When they pressure test tanks, like for CO2 or Nitrogen, or even home plumbing, they are filled with water for that reason. If they filled them with compressed air, you have a bomb. But with water, you get a leak, and it's done. There is very little stored energy.

To get your head around that, think how long it takes to fill a completely empty tire from a compressor running on a standard outlet, up to 30 PSI. It might take several minutes, and that means all the energy of that motor running for several minutes is stored in that tire.

Now imaging that tire was 99% filled with water, but not under any pressure. It would only take a few seconds for that compressor to pump that 1% remaining space up to 30 PSI. So it has very little energy stored in it.

One comment theorized that it was the very hot water leaking out when it exploded that suddenly turned to steam at atmospheric pressure. That could be, but that would just shoot steam on the outside the tank, I don't think it would work to propel the tank like a rocket?

Some other comments also mentioned that something else in the house would probably fail before 300 PSI, relieving the pressure in a less dramatic way (washer hot water line? Dishwasher line?).

That said, I'm a little surprised that they don't put a second, simple fail-safe on water heaters. If you look at a 'can style' electrolytic capacitor, you'll see an "X" stamped in the top of the can. If pressure builds up in a capacitor like that, those weak spots at the "X" will tear open, and keep the thing from exploding. CO2 tanks have something similar, a fitting with a little copper disc with an "X" that is designed to blow out before the tank limit is reached. Kind of like a fuse.

But yeah, don't over ride your T&P valve! It's there for a reason.

-ERD50
ERD50 is online now  
Old 03-10-2020, 09:42 PM   #2879
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 29,633
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
While of course they disabled the safety valve, and had to have also disabled the thermostat to do this, I wonder if there is something else going on for more drama?
...
I really wonder if that in addition to everything else, they also only had a couple gallons of water in the water heater. It would be easier to heat that small amount of water to boiling, and the space above filled with compressible steam would capture that huge amount of kinetic energy. Water itself is basically in-compressible, so if it were filled with water, there would not be that "wound up spring" effect of stored energy.
+1

Additionally, in real life, if the water pressure inside the heater gets higher than pressure of the mains (40 to 50 psi), would it not push the water and steam back out to the pipe in the street? Eventually, the heating element would stop being submerged in water, and it burns up.
__________________
"Those Who Can Make You Believe Absurdities Can Make You Commit Atrocities" - Voltaire (1694-1778)
NW-Bound is online now  
Old 03-10-2020, 10:50 PM   #2880
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 13,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
+1

Additionally, in real life, if the water pressure inside the heater gets higher than pressure of the mains (40 to 50 psi), would it not push the water and steam back out to the pipe in the street? Eventually, the heating element would stop being submerged in water, and it burns up.
Isn't there a check valve between the house and the street to keep any one house's problem from contaminating the whole water supply? I seem to recall this is why some houses have a little pressure tank on the main entrance pipe, to relieve pressure from normal expansion within the house's system.
travelover is offline  
Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Your recent repair? - 2021 Gumby Life after FIRE 383 Yesterday 11:37 AM
The Photographers' Corner 2013-2020 FIREd Life after FIRE 3481 12-30-2020 05:42 AM
What's your recent concert? gcgang Other topics 153 12-12-2018 08:29 PM
Any recent experience with buying a solar system for your house? eyeonFI Other topics 68 07-07-2014 06:41 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:18 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.