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Old 07-17-2020, 12:15 PM   #3141
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Originally Posted by Telly View Post
First thing I thought of, is the Eject button a mechanical eject, or is it really a switch for an electrical eject? If electrical, it won't work if there's no power.

Quick search:
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/24...page=15#manual

See the last page, Troubleshooting Guide, second symptom: The eject button does not function. Bingo!
Telly, thanks for the link. I was able to read it. The eject function is mechanical. It used to eject even with power off. In fact it ejected with power off just 2 hours ago. Then I bought 2 new fuses and put them in, turned on the machine, and now both tape doors are stuck closed, with cassettes inside, and won't eject!! Or play, or do anything. I should have removed the tape from the door that was still working, before I started fixing it. Now I know the replacement fuses have not immediately blown, which is good news, but it looks like there is some kind of a rubber belt problem going on, according to the internet wisdom. When I power on the deck, both motors make noise , trying to do something 3 times in a row, then everything comes to a halt until I push any button, then it tries something 3 times in a row again. I can see one of the belts looks very stretched and soft. Will have to see what youtube has to say about it. I think you can buy the 4 rubber belts it needs for $9 total, but it is a PITA to replace them.
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Old 07-17-2020, 12:36 PM   #3142
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Originally Posted by Time2 View Post
You could be right, but, a start capacitor is usually disconected after the motor starts. Also, it is labeled "RUN".


Why Must a Start Capacitor Must Drop from the Circuit After the Motor Starts?

To avoid burning out the motor windings or the capacitor itself, the huge current delivered by the start capacitor has to be turned off once the electric motor is running.



"There are two reasons the start capacitor canít stay in the circuit full time.
1. The start winding of the compressor canít carry such a heavy current continuously without overheating and burning out.
2. The start capacitors are made very compact and would overheat in a short while because they arenít big enough to dissipate heat as rapidly as itís generated."

https://inspectapedia.com/electric/S..._Operation.php





The capacitor causes a large phase shift between the start and the main windings resulting in more torque to start the motor.
https://www.brighthubengineering.com...on-run-motors/

Notice the 'start/run' capacitor is not across the motor winding, it's got it's own start winding. Therefore it doesn't drop out upon start up. Aftermarket hard start capacitors come with a relay attached that will drop it out however.

If the motor didn't have a start winding, then maybe the capacitor would need to drop out, but I've never seen one on a schematic that way.
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Old 07-17-2020, 01:22 PM   #3143
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I guess we are into semantics.
The schematic I posted calls them run capacitors. They are in the circuit while it is running. My definition of a start capacitor is a capacitor put in the motor circuit to start it. Called a start capacitor.

Note PSC motors do have an always connected capacitor and a start winding, but those aren't used as compressor motors, but are used as fan motors. As far as I have found.


Note 2nd and 3rd schematic drawings.
https://www.brighthubengineering.com...on-run-motors/


The point of my original schematic post was to show that there would be no charge on a run capacitor.
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Old 07-17-2020, 01:48 PM   #3144
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Along the electrical repair theme, DW informed me the vacuum beater bar motor was not working. The way it is designed, a small electric motor drives the beater bar, when both a switch on top (beater on or off for smooth floors or carpet) and a position switch that is normally closed to start the beater bar motor when the top is tilted back. That position switch is what was not working. So I just removed the switch out of the circuit so it is permanently closed (connected all the time). Now the beater bar still works when the top switch is engaged. Sure the beater bar will be rotating when vacuum is in the upright position, but so what. It is fixed for one small crimp connector and about 30 minutes of time, most of which was figuring out how to get it apart to access that position switch. Sorry no pics.
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Old 07-17-2020, 06:20 PM   #3145
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DW wanted a new kitchen faucet and I bought a new one and installed it in about 10 minutes. Ha, ha, ha.

Actually the problems first started when I went to shut off the feed valves. Both started dripping at the stem and when I removed the faucet line I found the valves were not shutting off, either. With water spraying under the cabinet, I was trying to catch it in a bucket as I called for DW to shut off the water at the main valve. That crisis averted, I decided to go to the big box store and buy new valves. Of course they were a bastard brand attached to a 1/2" copper stub with a plastic ferrule and I couldn't find a direct replacement yet was leery of doing anything that might expand my plumbing problems. I decided to take the old shut off valves apart and see if I could just install a new O ring, which amazingly, I did, and even more amazingly, they don't leak. So all in, a couple of hours, two trips to Covid infested big box stores and a couple hundred bucks for the faucet.
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Old 07-18-2020, 10:20 AM   #3146
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I'm mostly writing to make others aware of the superglue.baking soda trick.

Yesterday, my son pulled our van door closed and the armrest/doorpull came off in his hand. It broke in 6 places, mostly at the clip holders and screw holes. A few of the small broken pieces were missing, but we recover maybe 5 of the 9 pieces.
We started by super gluing the the pieces we had back into position. Then add more super glue in supporting places and sprinkle baking soda on top. I did this many time to make a thicker, stronger support across the cracks. For the missing pieces I just kept repeating, glue, baking soda, over and over until the void was filled. The combination dries hard as a rock, so if you need flexibility, you need to get it elsewhere.

I put the baking soda on a creased sheet of paper so I could dump a large amount on the glue, then just tap it off back onto the creased sheet for reuse. I recommend a thin superglue, it just works better.

There are lots of Youtube videos on this, here are a few.

Here's video to learn from his mistake.

The superglue/baking soda reaction is very quick, it is also exothermic, but localized, so cools quickly.

Some pictures to show some of the repair, all but the small white triangle are internal and can't be seen when assembled. The 1st pic shows the whole arm rest with some of the repairs the rectangular holes where broken out in pieces, and the repair in the middle is where arm rest was cracked into two pieces. The 2nd pic shows the repair of that crack and the 3rd pic is the otherside of that repaired crack with a fill in for a missing piece.
Hope that helps your next repair.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Door Arm Rest.jpg (444.8 KB, 30 views)
File Type: jpg Door Arm Rest 2.jpg (1.10 MB, 26 views)
File Type: jpg Door Arm Rest 3.jpg (104.9 KB, 24 views)
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Old 07-18-2020, 11:12 AM   #3147
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Time2 View Post
I'm mostly writing to make others aware of the superglue.baking soda trick.

Yesterday, my son pulled our van door closed and the armrest/doorpull came off in his hand. It broke in 6 places, mostly at the clip holders and screw holes. A few of the small broken pieces were missing, but we recover maybe 5 of the 9 pieces.
We started by super gluing the the pieces we had back into position. Then add more super glue in supporting places and sprinkle baking soda on top. I did this many time to make a thicker, stronger support across the cracks. For the missing pieces I just kept repeating, glue, baking soda, over and over until the void was filled. The combination dries hard as a rock, so if you need flexibility, you need to get it elsewhere.

Let us know if the repair proves to be durable.
In my experience, plastics are notoriously difficult WRT bond strength. For structural/sealing repairs best results are usually achieved with heat or chemical welding techniques - e.g ABS/PVC cement. Good luck!
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Old 07-18-2020, 11:16 AM   #3148
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Two part superglues are now available in big box stores for notoriously difficult plastics. And superglue/accelerator/more superglue, etc., to build a thick coat of superglue that cures, may be better than the baking soda technique.
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Old 07-18-2020, 11:49 AM   #3149
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Time2 View Post
I'm mostly writing to make others aware of the superglue.baking soda trick.

Yesterday, my son pulled our van door closed and the armrest/doorpull came off in his hand. It broke in 6 places, mostly at the clip holders and screw holes. A few of the small broken pieces were missing, but we recover maybe 5 of the 9 pieces.
...
Hope that helps your next repair.
Really interesting and useful trick with superglue.

Hope it holds on the car part.

Normally for a car part, I either buy a part online (camry door handle) , or visit a car junkyard.

How old is the van ?
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Old 07-18-2020, 11:54 AM   #3150
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Originally Posted by Boho View Post
Two part superglues are now available in big box stores for notoriously difficult plastics. And superglue/accelerator/more superglue, etc., to build a thick coat of superglue that cures, may be better than the baking soda technique.



Unless the glue contains some type of solvent that softens and penetrates the target plastic to allow chemical crosslinking of the bond, I doubt good results can be achieved in a structuraly demanding application.
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Old 07-18-2020, 12:11 PM   #3151
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Unless the glue contains some type of solvent that softens and penetrates the target plastic to allow chemical crosslinking of the bond, I doubt good results can be achieved in a structuraly demanding application.
Yes, heptane.

The link to the data sheet is broken on Loctite's website but I found the data sheet here.
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Old 07-18-2020, 12:52 PM   #3152
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Two part superglues are now available in big box stores for notoriously difficult plastics. And superglue/accelerator/more superglue, etc., to build a thick coat of superglue that cures, may be better than the baking soda technique.
This is not one of those notoriously difficult plastics, AKA polyethelyne and polypropylene.
I don't know what it is, but the glue took to it well.
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Old 07-18-2020, 12:55 PM   #3153
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Let us know if the repair proves to be durable.
In my experience, plastics are notoriously difficult WRT bond strength. For structural/sealing repairs best results are usually achieved with heat or chemical welding techniques - e.g ABS/PVC cement. Good luck!
Will do, but I'm very confident about the repair, as I said to another, whatever type of plastic it is, it took very well to the superglue. It has been reassembled and we put it through some good pulls without mishap.
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Old 07-18-2020, 01:03 PM   #3154
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Really interesting and useful trick with superglue.

Hope it holds on the car part.

Normally for a car part, I either buy a part online (camry door handle) , or visit a car junkyard.

Ya, but a little time while the TV was on, $1.50 worth of glue and a dimes worth of baking soda and I have it together.
Camry :-) Yup, repaired two inside and two outside Camry door handles, In those I either used screws or metal pins and epoxy to put them back together.

Quote:
How old is the van ?
2007 3/4 ton GMC
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Old 07-22-2020, 12:56 PM   #3155
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Can't find a youtube for the exact model of Sony cassette deck I have, but found one for a different Sony. Watched it enough times to see what's what. Will now take apart my Sony tape deck and hope to find it is fixable by replacing belts.
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Old 07-24-2020, 08:22 AM   #3156
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Can't find a youtube for the exact model of Sony cassette deck I have, but found one for a different Sony. Watched it enough times to see what's what. Will now take apart my Sony tape deck and hope to find it is fixable by replacing belts.
Took all the easy screws out. Nothing coming off though. Starting to look like a nightmare. Not giving up yet. Still looking for a 'how to' somewhere.
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Old 07-24-2020, 08:41 AM   #3157
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On a more successful front, I repaired the rear tire on my resuscitated 10 speed road bike. I had pumped up the tire to the recommended high psi, something over 60 psi, probably, and took her out for a spin. After about a half mile, I got 2 bulges from the rear tire, and a thumping, once per revolution. Took her back to the barn for a look see. The tire had come off the rim somewhat in 2 spots. No leak. Tube inside was intact. I deflated the tire, pushed the edges of the tire back into the rim, and reinflated incrementally over the next 2 days, making sure the tire stayed inside the rim, and got get the psi back up to 42. The tire was just slightly bulging at 42 psi. Took her out for a 3 mile ride, and she's doing fine. I plan on leaving the psi at 42, which is really low, according to the internet experts, but it's better than that awful bulge. Smooth ride, too. And unlimited non-boring exercise.
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Old 07-24-2020, 08:52 AM   #3158
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Took all the easy screws out. Nothing coming off though. Starting to look like a nightmare. Not giving up yet. Still looking for a 'how to' somewhere.
Good luck. I saw a youtube on a similar deck, and it was a lot of work to get to the belts.

I had a high quality cassette deck, and I checked it out a few years ago to convert a few remaining cassettes to digital format, and no-go. Belt was broke. Took it apart, and man, it would have required massive effort to get to the belt. I decided it wasn't worth it, the tapes I was converting were not high quality, so I used a cheaper deck I had, then recycled the good one.

I get hits in what look like similar models - is this mechanically the same?







And here's the service manual:

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/10...?page=5#manual

Get those tapes digitized! They don't last forever.

-ERD50
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Old 07-24-2020, 09:06 AM   #3159
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On a more successful front, I repaired the rear tire on my resuscitated 10 speed road bike. I had pumped up the tire to the recommended high psi, something over 60 psi, probably, and took her out for a spin. After about a half mile, I got 2 bulges from the rear tire, and a thumping, once per revolution. Took her back to the barn for a look see. The tire had come off the rim somewhat in 2 spots. No leak. Tube inside was intact. I deflated the tire, pushed the edges of the tire back into the rim, and reinflated incrementally over the next 2 days, making sure the tire stayed inside the rim, and got get the psi back up to 42. The tire was just slightly bulging at 42 psi. Took her out for a 3 mile ride, and she's doing fine. I plan on leaving the psi at 42, which is really low, according to the internet experts, but it's better than that awful bulge. Smooth ride, too. And unlimited non-boring exercise.
How much is a replacement tire? 10 bucks? Is it really worth taking the chance of a blowout at the far end of your 3 mile ride? Not my problem, obviously, but: really?
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Old 07-24-2020, 09:58 AM   #3160
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Originally Posted by John Galt III View Post
On a more successful front, I repaired the rear tire on my resuscitated 10 speed road bike. I had pumped up the tire to the recommended high psi, something over 60 psi, probably, and took her out for a spin. After about a half mile, I got 2 bulges from the rear tire, and a thumping, once per revolution. Took her back to the barn for a look see. The tire had come off the rim somewhat in 2 spots. No leak. Tube inside was intact. I deflated the tire, pushed the edges of the tire back into the rim, and reinflated incrementally over the next 2 days, making sure the tire stayed inside the rim, and got get the psi back up to 42. The tire was just slightly bulging at 42 psi. Took her out for a 3 mile ride, and she's doing fine. I plan on leaving the psi at 42, which is really low, according to the internet experts, but it's better than that awful bulge. Smooth ride, too. And unlimited non-boring exercise.
If i can assume that you are using the same tire and not a different size for the wheel you have then it may be that the tire bead wasn't properly seated in the wheel. The tube could push under the tire and bulge. If it is a different size tire than the original then it could be the tire width is either too large or too small. That will cause the tire to come off the wheel.

60 psi is not really high pressure but you still need to inflate to somewhere between the minimum and maximum pressure indicated on the tire. Too little pressure can result in what is called a "snake bite" on the tube and a flat tire. Bicycles - a kinetic work of art!


Cheers!
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