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Old 09-16-2020, 08:37 AM   #3241
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I'm having the rotted wooden brick mould trim replaced around an exterior french door, with PVC. I noticed there are 2 different forms of PVC brick mould available. One has a completely flat backing, the other has a half inch wide, quarter inch deep notch all along the back, approx in the middle of the piece. Any reason to get one and not the other? The store clerks say it makes no difference. I asked about a nail going through the notch, same answer, doesn't matter. Why the difference in shape?
PVC trim is often molded to the same profile as wood trim. For wood trim that notch on the back helps reduce warping, but it shouldn't make any difference with PVC.

From a practical standpoint, having a notch on the back would help bridge irregularities behind the trim. I would opt for the notched version.
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Old 09-16-2020, 08:46 AM   #3242
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Store clerks aren't my "go-to" for getting any information beyond which isle to find something.

I think it's just to save on manufacturing cost; the die that produces the product with the smaller cross sectional area will take less material and the machine can run faster (the thickest part of the extrusion limits the speed).
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Old 09-17-2020, 04:57 AM   #3243
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Thanks for the replies, everyone! I bought three 8 foot lengths of the notched variety at Home Depot. $10.39 each. They were sold out at the first HD. The very nice clerk called a nearby HD and they had 6 left. Must be a covid 19 thing. Everyone replacing rotted trim, lol. What about my other question? Can you glue two pieces of 1.5 inch by 1.5 inch PVC post together, then cut it, to make a 1 and 7/8 by 1 and 7/16 post ? I need to replace the bottom 8 inches of the center post in the french door. I'm having a handyman do it. It looks like the biggest PVC post you can find anywhere on the planet is the 1.5 by 1.5 at HD. Fencing stores only have the hollow stuff.
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Old 09-17-2020, 08:50 AM   #3244
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Can you glue two pieces of 1.5 inch by 1.5 inch PVC post together, then cut it, to make a 1 and 7/8 by 1 and 7/16 post ? I need to replace the bottom 8 inches of the center post in the french door.
I don't see why not. I believe the box stores even sell a PVC cement for the purpose right next to the PVC lumber. If not, you could probably use regular PVC plumbing cement. Just make sure to get the clear stuff and not the blue stuff. I've heard there is also a clear adhesive in caulking tubes made for PVC, but I've never seen it myself. If so, that might give you more working time than regular PVC cement.

Gorilla also makes a PVC glue with no odor and longer working time.
https://www.amazon.com/GORILLA-PVC-R...00HSO1APU?th=1

I would think the hardest part of laminating two PVC boards together would be getting the glue on fast enough to stick the boards together before the glue dries. I would probably cut the PVC into short sections, maybe 12" long, so they're easier to work with for your task.

You can certainly cut PVC to size with a saw. I hate cutting PVC though as it leaves little plastic shavings everywhere that stick to everything due to static electricity. You can't really sweep it up, a shop vac is the only way I've found to clean up the mess.
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Old 09-17-2020, 10:24 AM   #3245
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For laminating the PVC, I would not want to cut it into sections as joining them nicely will be hard.
Maybe use a paintbrush to slop on the glue quickly, it doesn't have to be waterproof like a pipe joint so not quite as critical in coverage.

Alternatively, how about using a pressure treated wood piece and painting it, or covering with a PVC sleeve ?
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Old 09-17-2020, 10:37 AM   #3246
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For laminating the PVC, I would not want to cut it into sections as joining them nicely will be hard.
Just to clarify, I was suggesting if the OP only needed an 8" piece, to only laminate a 12" blank or so that can then be milled to the desired size and shape. No need to laminate 8 foot boards if you only need 8 inches.

However, I agree, trying to patch an 8" repair into the existing jamb will be problematic.

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Alternatively, how about using a pressure treated wood piece and painting it, or covering with a PVC sleeve ?
When the bottoms of our door jambs rotted away, I simply ordered a new composite door frame and reused our existing doors. It cost way less than a new prehung door, won't rot, and I didn't have any patch sections to deal with.
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Old 09-17-2020, 03:09 PM   #3247
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For laminating the PVC, I would not want to cut it into sections as joining them nicely will be hard.
Maybe use a paintbrush to slop on the glue quickly, it doesn't have to be waterproof like a pipe joint so not quite as critical in coverage.

Alternatively, how about using a pressure treated wood piece and painting it, or covering with a PVC sleeve ?
Remember I'm having a handyman do this job. I've had 2 of them look at it and both said they could cut out the 8 inches of rotted wood, and splice in part of a 2 x 4 (pressure treated) or, even better, some PVC. Interestingly, neither one of them admitted to having any PVC on hand that would fit there, and they didn't know where to get it, but thought they could find it somewhere. These guys both have many years experience. Strange they don't know about PVC size availability. I didn't actually ask them if they could glue pieces together. I did a repair to this door myself about 10 years ago, in a different rotted area, with a 2 x 4 I cut up, and painted, and it is still holding up against the elements. No rot on the outside, not sure about the inside. I'd do the center post job myself, if it were more staightforward, but it involves cutting a groove for a kerf seal, and also planing down one half of one side of the 8 inch piece. What is a PVC sleeve and where can I buy one?
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Old 09-18-2020, 05:14 PM   #3248
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FINALLY got the Honda FG100 tiller running right. First thing in the spring, it wouldn't start at all. Tried cleaning the carburetor, that didn't work and then replaced it. That worked, I thought, but only for a while. After some period of running, usually about a half hour or so it would start bogging down and eventually quit. After some time fussing with this aspect of things, it dawned on me that this always happened at about a half tank of fuel. Filling the tank made it run fine again, so clearly there was a hole in the fuel pickup line in the tank. It took a while to find that type of fuel line, it has to be thin-walled and very flexible to follow the "clunk" type fuel filter in the tank.

The thing is, I took that line out of the tank and examined it in minute detail, with a magnifying glass even, and couldn't find a thing wrong with it. Nonetheless, replacing that line fixed the problem and now it runs fine with a quarter-tank of fuel in it.
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Old 09-19-2020, 04:21 PM   #3249
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FINALLY got the Honda FG100 tiller running right. First thing in the spring, it wouldn't start at all. Tried cleaning the carburetor, that didn't work and then replaced it. That worked, I thought, but only for a while. After some period of running, usually about a half hour or so it would start bogging down and eventually quit. After some time fussing with this aspect of things, it dawned on me that this always happened at about a half tank of fuel. Filling the tank made it run fine again, so clearly there was a hole in the fuel pickup line in the tank. It took a while to find that type of fuel line, it has to be thin-walled and very flexible to follow the "clunk" type fuel filter in the tank.

The thing is, I took that line out of the tank and examined it in minute detail, with a magnifying glass even, and couldn't find a thing wrong with it. Nonetheless, replacing that line fixed the problem and now it runs fine with a quarter-tank of fuel in it.
I once had a chainsaw become impossible to start, turned out the fuel line had rotted/dissolved away after 30 years.
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Old 09-19-2020, 04:26 PM   #3250
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I decided my SSD in my computer was too small at 250 Gig. So I bought a new 100 Gig one.
I used clonezilla to clone the small one to the big one.
Problem was the big one kept pretending to be small, the issue appears to be that I have my disk encrypted.

It took many hours over many days... so many I started telling DW I might give her the new drive as I needed some way to get some value out of the $100 it cost me.

Finally today, I decided I'd clone again and then follow another set of steps off the internet.. and it finally WORKED.....

I've decided I'll hold off on further upgrading my system for a couple of years
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Old 09-19-2020, 06:54 PM   #3251
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I decided my SSD in my computer was too small at 250 Gig. So I bought a new 100 Gig one.
I used clonezilla to clone the small one to the big one.
Problem was the big one kept pretending to be small, the issue appears to be that I have my disk encrypted.

It took many hours over many days... so many I started telling DW I might give her the new drive as I needed some way to get some value out of the $100 it cost me.

Finally today, I decided I'd clone again and then follow another set of steps off the internet.. and it finally WORKED.....

I've decided I'll hold off on further upgrading my system for a couple of years
As I recall from looking at Clonezilla eons ago, since it is literally creating a clone, the target drive is sized to the same size as the source drive. Otherwise, it's not a clone, is it?

The same 'problem' occurs in reverse. People though they should be able to clone a 500GB drive to a 250 GB drive, because they only had 100GB of data. Makes no difference, it's a clone. They have to be equal, unused space and all. In both directions.

I would think you'd just need to use a partitioning program to add the unused space to that cloned partition.

-ERD50
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Old 09-19-2020, 06:58 PM   #3252
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I once had a chainsaw become impossible to start, turned out the fuel line had rotted/dissolved away after 30 years.
Years ago, I had a slight gasoline odor in the garage. Couldn't figure out where it was coming from.

I then realized the fuel line on my garden tractor had just become rotted/dissolved/permeable. Gasoline sort of wicked through it, but it evaporated before it could cause a drip or noticeable leak. Local auto store sold fuel line by the foot, so it was a quick/cheap fix.

-ERD50
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Old 09-19-2020, 10:15 PM   #3253
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As I recall from looking at Clonezilla eons ago, since it is literally creating a clone, the target drive is sized to the same size as the source drive. Otherwise, it's not a clone, is it?

The same 'problem' occurs in reverse. People though they should be able to clone a 500GB drive to a 250 GB drive, because they only had 100GB of data. Makes no difference, it's a clone. They have to be equal, unused space and all. In both directions.

I would think you'd just need to use a partitioning program to add the unused space to that cloned partition.

-ERD50
The first time after cloning, I used gParted (a partition manager) to enlarge the partitions, but this has no effect on system view of the encrypted file size.

Using clonezilla with the advanced settings and the -k1 switch allows it to proportionally resize all the partitions to a larger size (in my case). This was a lot better than resizing them myself.

I spent a LOT of time researching to understand the steps needed and trying them out on my new clone. Once I figured out I had the answer, I redid the clone to have a clean updated copy.

Then I did about 10 command line commands to adjust the system file size.
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Old 09-21-2020, 04:45 AM   #3254
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For laminating the PVC, I would not want to cut it into sections as joining them nicely will be hard.
Maybe use a paintbrush to slop on the glue quickly, it doesn't have to be waterproof like a pipe joint so not quite as critical in coverage.

Alternatively, how about using a pressure treated wood piece and painting it, or covering with a PVC sleeve ?
I opted for using a piece of pressure treated wood. The handyman custom made a piece to use in the french door repair. So it's all from one piece, not two glued together. I did use PVC for the brick mould. I got the kind with the notch in the back. Looks good.
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Old 09-22-2020, 09:00 AM   #3255
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Twelve years ago we installed a simple drain in our driveway to prevent a lake from forming when it rained. This summer we replaced the center drain with a full width channel drain.

A few days ago we had a heavy rain and noticed a small lake was forming again. It eventually drained, but slowly. I ran a snake down the drain to see if I could find the clog, but it kept getting stuck partway in and there were small roots on the end of the snake when I pulled it out. So I measured the distance to the clog and decided to dig up the line and investigate.

Turns out a tree root had found it's way into one of the elbow slip joints (Polyethylene drain pipe, so the joints weren't glued). It had grown to about 3/4 inch thick and had busted the elbow apart. I cut out the elbow and discovered the root continued inside the pipe for another 18 feet! It was quite the workout pulling the roots and associated mud seal out of the pipe. It's amazing the snake could make it past all those roots without getting stuck.

I replaced the old 45 with a couple of 22.5 elbows for a smoother bend and used rubber Fernco couplings to add the repair in the buried line. Hopefully the tighter seal will prevent future root intrusion.
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Old 09-22-2020, 10:53 AM   #3256
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You wouldn't think tree roots would be that "smart", but the little extra water leaking out of the 45 was like gold on those hot dry days. Glue!
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Old 09-22-2020, 11:11 AM   #3257
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You wouldn't think tree roots would be that "smart", but the little extra water leaking out of the 45 was like gold on those hot dry days. Glue!
Yeah, it was amazing to see how the tree could seek out that tiny water source and work it's way through the very tight gap into the pipe. In just 12 years the root had to grow at least two feet outside the pipe, and another 18 feet inside the pipe. Amazing.

When I was struggling to pull the long root out of the pipe it almost seemed alien. I just kept pulling, and pulling, and pulling. Disbelief and a little freaky.
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Old 09-22-2020, 12:24 PM   #3258
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Yeah, it was amazing to see how the tree could seek out that tiny water source .....
That poor tree is trying to tell you something. Water me!
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Old 09-22-2020, 12:49 PM   #3259
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FINALLY got the Honda FG100 tiller running right. First thing in the spring, it wouldn't start at all. Tried cleaning the carburetor, that didn't work and then replaced it. That worked, I thought, but only for a while. After some period of running, usually about a half hour or so it would start bogging down and eventually quit. After some time fussing with this aspect of things, it dawned on me that this always happened at about a half tank of fuel. Filling the tank made it run fine again, so clearly there was a hole in the fuel pickup line in the tank. It took a while to find that type of fuel line, it has to be thin-walled and very flexible to follow the "clunk" type fuel filter in the tank.

The thing is, I took that line out of the tank and examined it in minute detail, with a magnifying glass even, and couldn't find a thing wrong with it. Nonetheless, replacing that line fixed the problem and now it runs fine with a quarter-tank of fuel in it.
Another thing to check is the vent hole in the tank cap. On my mower, it clogged up and the mower would starve for fuel shortly after starting it. Cleaned it and no more problems.
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Old 09-22-2020, 12:52 PM   #3260
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That poor tree is trying to tell you something. Water me!
We are planning to remove those two alder trees (either side of the fern in the second photo). They are getting old and drop a lot of limbs every year. Kind of dangerous to have around the cars. They also tend to rot inside around this age and fall over unexpectedly. We actually had another Alder that size break off a couple weeks ago behind our garage during a wind storm. Thankfully it was so rotten it was light enough to sit on top of the small vine maples and not land on the garage roof or take out the gutters. I threw a rope around it and pulled it down where I could cut it up.

Unfortunately, we've had too many other projects this summer, so the tree removal will probably have to wait till next summer.

The alders literally grow like weeds around here. I'm constantly pulling the new seedlings from the flower beds. Unfortunately, they don't live very long.
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