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Old 06-07-2017, 08:28 AM   #1941
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I've been using the sulfur smoke bombs to rid my yard of ground squirrels. It has worked well and it's FUN too.
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Old 06-09-2017, 08:44 AM   #1942
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Relayed elsewhere, I just replaced the battery in my Buick. Only thing interesting in the story is that the battery isn't under the hood. It's under the rear seat cushion. Heh, heh, glad I found out before the battery went 100% fail! Picture the poor guy without a flashlight, in the rain on a country road praying that someone with jumper cables comes along - only to find out "there's NO BATTERY in this thing!"

Only one garage would even do the job (for $185). Something about working inside the cabin instead of under the hood - who knows! Anyway, it was a piece of cake to replace for $102 (Sams battery). Actually much cleaner space to work and very little dead lifting of the battery. Only "trick" was to connect the vent tube to an exit hole in the bottom of the well where the battery sits. From being concerned that it would be a nightmare, I've come away thinking that most cars could benefit from such an arrangement for the battery. YMMV
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Old 06-09-2017, 05:47 PM   #1943
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Yeah, when you said it was under the seat, I thought "what happens to the hydrogen"!!
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Old 06-09-2017, 06:24 PM   #1944
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Heh, heh, glad I found out before the battery went 100% fail! Picture the poor guy without a flashlight, in the rain on a country road praying that someone with jumper cables comes along - only to find out "there's NO BATTERY in this thing!"
Every car I have seen with the battery under the rear seat or in the trunk still had a positive stud in the engine compartment just for jump starting.
I'm pretty sure yours has one also.
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Old 06-09-2017, 06:32 PM   #1945
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Yeah, when you said it was under the seat, I thought "what happens to the hydrogen"!!
My old Econoline (1966) had the battery inside, but it was in a vented box, similar to that used on RVs. My 1965 VW had the battery under the rear seat, but there were so many rust holes that it was ventilated - that is until I hit a big bump and the battery went through the floor.
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Old 06-09-2017, 07:49 PM   #1946
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Every car I have seen with the battery under the rear seat or in the trunk still had a positive stud in the engine compartment just for jump starting.
I'm pretty sure yours has one also.
My 1971 VW Beetle is not equipped with one.
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Old 06-09-2017, 07:59 PM   #1947
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My 1971 VW Beetle is not equipped with one.
I should have said modern car not relic.
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Old 06-09-2017, 08:03 PM   #1948
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I should have said modern car not relic.
It's a good idea, though. I should make the installation of a engine location hot positive battery connection part of my restoration efforts. I would only need to run about a 3' cable and fixed mount.
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Old 06-09-2017, 08:09 PM   #1949
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Where are the foxes when you need them? Where I live I see foxes every so often and I suspect that chipmunks look like a good lunch to them. (Same with Squirrels )
I live in the city but have several foxes patrol my backyard (5 ac of undeveloped forest right behind me). Still got plenty of squirrels and rabbits though

Lazy foxes
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Old 06-09-2017, 08:23 PM   #1950
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It's a good idea, though. I should make the installation of a engine location hot positive battery connection part of my restoration efforts. I would only need to run about a 3' cable and fixed mount.
It would make life easier on occasion.
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Old 06-09-2017, 08:33 PM   #1951
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My old Econoline (1966) had the battery inside, but it was in a vented box, similar to that used on RVs. My 1965 VW had the battery under the rear seat, but there were so many rust holes that it was ventilated - that is until I hit a big bump and the battery went through the floor.
OMG! I almost forgot, I owned one of that vintage (forget the exact year), an Illinois Bell auction sale, a few hundred bucks I think. I remember the engine compartment hood in side, but I forget where the battery was. I recall the choke was a pull knob right in the middle front of that engine compartment.

The carb was always giving me problems, and sometimes I'd need to pull the choke a bit just to keep it running. Makes you appreciate fuel injection and computer controls!

Does this bring back any memories:



He claims the in-line 6 had a lot of power, I don't remember that. I recall barely keeping 55 mph in a headwind! Had to work that Three-On-A-Tree!

-ERD50
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Old 06-09-2017, 10:20 PM   #1952
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Every car I have seen with the battery under the rear seat or in the trunk still had a positive stud in the engine compartment just for jump starting.
I'm pretty sure yours has one also.
I'm sure you're right - I just have no idea where it is. It could be in the manual, but I didn't get that far. I could tell the battery was weak, so that was my focus. Just for future reference, I'm sure I SHOULD figure out how to jump it without trying to do it at the battery (a bad idea in general - and even worse inside the cabin - think Hindenburg.)
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Old 06-09-2017, 10:28 PM   #1953
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OMG! I almost forgot, I owned one of that vintage (forget the exact year), an Illinois Bell auction sale, a few hundred bucks I think. I remember the engine compartment hood in side, but I forget where the battery was. I recall the choke was a pull knob right in the middle front of that engine compartment.

The carb was always giving me problems, and sometimes I'd need to pull the choke a bit just to keep it running. Makes you appreciate fuel injection and computer controls!

He claims the in-line 6 had a lot of power, I don't remember that. I recall barely keeping 55 mph in a headwind! Had to work that Three-On-A-Tree!

-ERD50
I had one of those. It was a pickup model.
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Old 06-09-2017, 11:07 PM   #1954
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He claims the in-line 6 had a lot of power, I don't remember that. I recall barely keeping 55 mph in a headwind! Had to work that Three-On-A-Tree!

-ERD50
Can't speak for the Ford "big six" but I drove a 1966 big six (250 CI) Chevy pickup truck for a summer j*b. I did a route which took me to the next state over. On the way home (empty) I was always running late so I'd do 105 indicated on a few lonely stretches of 2 lane. Not wise, I'm sure, but that truck just loved to go fast. YMMV
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Old 06-16-2017, 01:43 PM   #1955
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We have an arm-rest 12 volt electric cooler in our camper van. It looks like the image below from Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Besides being a comfortable place to rest our elbows, it keeps some pop & water cold for long trips, reducing the number of times we have to open the large cooler so things keep longer there.
Two weeks ago it stopped working. The fan was spinning, the power light was on, but the inside wasn't cold and the fan wasn't blowing warm air. I opened it up and checked the components on the small circuit board (two diodes and two resistors). All working. Checked the Peltier element and it was open.
Found replacement Peltier elements, thermal grease and some shrink tube on Ebay for under $20 total. Opened it up today, cleaned & re-greased the contact surfaces, put in a new element and reassembled everything and it works. Yippee!
So I learned some things, got a feeling of accomplishment, and impressed my DW all in one day!
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Old 06-16-2017, 02:11 PM   #1956
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Replaced the steering shaft and some other related parts on my riding mower...at a cost of $61 for the parts and a two hours of labour.
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Old 06-17-2017, 07:27 AM   #1957
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Was doing some vacuuming with my ancient Eureka upright. It was making some knocking sound, which I assumed was some bearing wearing out. Oh well, it's old. Just for kicks, I opened it up and found a huge amount of hair wrapped around every possible part. Spent 15 minutes tearing out strands of hair and throwing it out. Also noticed the rubber belt was cracked in several places. Harvested a newer (used) belt from my stash and installed it. Fired up the old beast. Now it has more suction, and the knocking sound is gone!! Very satisfying.
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Old 06-20-2017, 06:40 PM   #1958
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So I finally found a time to replace an outdoor faucet today with my son's "help." On the old one, the shaft was stripped making it difficult make sure it was fully closed, so we tended not to use that faucet.

Nothing remarkable about the replacement, but my college-age son hasn't done many fix-it projects around the house, so I thought he needed some practice.

What is remarkable is that I used a tool I inherited from my dad when he died in the '90s that I thought I would never use: It was a flathead screwdriver socket for a half-inch drive. I knew exactly where it was in an old tool box. Whenever I saw it, I always thought: I will never use this socket. But today, we needed to remove grounding wires attached to the pipe by a clamp held with large machine screws that had rusted quite a bit. A large flathead screwdriver just didn't have the leverage to get things going, but the ratchet+socket provided the leverage.

I don't know if my son got anything out of this, but probably so. I expect in another 40 years, he will get to use that same socket after he inherits it from me.

I expect lots of folks have some old inherited tools they haven't used yet.
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Old 06-20-2017, 06:55 PM   #1959
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...

I don't know if my son got anything out of this, but probably so. I expect in another 40 years, he will get to use that same socket after he inherits it from me.
...
I think the lessons my kids got out of helping me on these projects was - rent! Or hire someone!

Though I did buy a tool kit for each kid when they went off to college, and they did help out when something in the room or someone's car needed a tweak.

-ERD50
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Old 06-21-2017, 10:13 AM   #1960
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Checked the Peltier element and it was open.
Found replacement Peltier elements, thermal grease and some shrink tube on Ebay for under $20 total.
That's a good fix. I've been doing less and less of that kind of diagnostic/fix work lately because, first of all, buying a new one is sometimes very cheap, and second, I'm often not convinced enough of finding a smoking gun to spend money on parts. Before you bought parts, did you have any reinforcement from from youtube or other Internet research to suggest that Peltiers often fail open and that the rest of the unit wasn't fried?
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