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Letter of Resignation
Old 02-10-2019, 03:15 AM   #1
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Letter of Resignation

I have mixed feelings about letters of resignation. So I seek advice since it is nearing the time I give mine.

Backstory:
My current place of employment (a juvenile detention facility) has been deteriorating over the past 2-6 years. Most of the problems we face are due to poor management, lack of checks and balances that used to take place, and not holding staff accountable for anything. I remember 6 years ago everyone trusted what their supervisor said, had positive things to say about the goals of the facility, and worked together to solve day-to-day problems. Every year it seems to be getting worse and worse, to the point that every day people are talking about how terrible their job is and how they have no respect for anyone they work for. There is definitely a huge increase of people who just take the low road and abuse sick leave use or "get hurt" and take months off from work. It is very hard for government workers to be terminated, or much harder than it was 9 years ago when I first started.

Anyways, many of the people I have got to know are no longer here. People I admired, people I trusted, and people who mentored me. Everyone of them left because they were not happy with the direction the facility was going and they lost most respect for those who supervised them. All of them, from what I know, gave their notice in the traditional sense. Thanks for this and that, I will miss you all, I am so grateful, etc... And they all get the standing ovation, the parade, the juice and cake.

What is wrong with being honest with your employer about why you are leaving? You can be respectful and thankful for what opportunities you were given, but why fail to even mention, "hey, this facility has deteriorated to the point that I no longer want to work here. And I am not very happy about it because I actually like what I do. I just have no confidence in those who supervise me and the position they put me in day after day." My employer used to do exit interviews when people quit like 5 years ago. But that's just an example of how the place has gotten worse, they don't even do that anymore.

I have no problem with thanking those who helped me out over the years and giving them that recognition. But why hide the truth that I don't agree with most of the practices they do nowadays? At times I think I need to do it, to satisfy my own dignity and also to try and advocate for those who can't just walk away for the various reasons they may can't.

Like I said, I know the job was getting bad for some time now. And I went back to school and now I'm a licensed IV certified LPN. I'm now in school for my RN and that will be done in December. So future employment is looking better and better. And I don't think I would stay working where I am at now in 3 months even if things did get better overnight. The damage is done and I have been preparing to leave regardless.

I just don't know if I should follow what other people have done when they chose to leave.
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Old 02-10-2019, 05:53 AM   #2
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Does your employer do exit interviews? That would be a good opportunity to express those thoughts. If not, perhaps asking for a meeting with a senior executive.
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Old 02-10-2019, 05:57 AM   #3
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If you are leaving to go find another job, saying anything negative to the current employer on the way out may cause them to give you a less favorable reference than you would have gotten otherwise. This may or may not be a concern in your particular situation. This is one reason why many people just prefer to leave quietly, no matter how unhappy they are.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:04 AM   #4
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It is a j*b. Simply tell them when your last day of work will be and go.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:29 AM   #5
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Just keep the resignation letter short and sweet. No reason to say any more because it's not going to change anything there.

You have spent 9 years in a very difficult place to work, and life will be uphill from there. Children are becoming more "hardened" in this world, especially with easier availability of stronger drugs. I'm sure juvenile detention facilities have not changed with the times, especially since everyone now has such rights under the law.

Just put it all behind you. Be thankful that you've had the foresight and talents to get your RN finished and that you have a good career ahead of you.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:32 AM   #6
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They probably know already and either agree with you, or don't care (because they're part of the problem). Ending the practice of exit interviews usually happens when they want to stop hearing all the ways they're messed up.

Anyone high up enough to enact change will only see major signs, like the rats leaving the sinking ship. Be a rat.

I would recommend, however, that if there are any civil rights violations of the juveniles at your facility, that you blow the whistle.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:37 AM   #7
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Just put it all behind you. Be thankful that you've had the foresight and talents to get your RN finished and that you have a good career ahead of you.

Thatís a good perspective. Start where you are.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:37 AM   #8
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Does your employer do exit interviews? That would be a good opportunity to express those thoughts. If not, perhaps asking for a meeting with a senior executive.
They used to do exit interviews, especially with employees who were with the organization for several years.

I know several people who had 10+ years and no exit interview was given.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:38 AM   #9
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If you are leaving to go find another job, saying anything negative to the current employer on the way out may cause them to give you a less favorable reference than you would have gotten otherwise. This may or may not be a concern in your particular situation. This is one reason why many people just prefer to leave quietly, no matter how unhappy they are.
Thanks for the input. I'm not overly concerned about the reference from this place. Going into the nursing field it is a high demand. They will hire you even with a less favorable reference .

But I do plant to get some experience as a nurse and use those as better references.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:39 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Lewis Clark View Post
If you are leaving to go find another job, saying anything negative to the current employer on the way out may cause them to give you a less favorable reference than you would have gotten otherwise. This may or may not be a concern in your particular situation. This is one reason why many people just prefer to leave quietly, no matter how unhappy they are.
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It is a j*b. Simply tell them when your last day of work will be and go.
My advice too. While it may give you a good feeling of closure, it's not necessary at all. Your friends will know your true feelings, and your enemies won't care.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:42 AM   #11
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They probably know already and either agree with you, or don't care (because they're part of the problem). Ending the practice of exit interviews usually happens when they want to stop hearing all the ways they're messed up.

Anyone high up enough to enact change will only see major signs, like the rats leaving the sinking ship. Be a rat.

I would recommend, however, that if there are any civil rights violations of the juveniles at your facility, that you blow the whistle.

I know what you mean, some times we complain to your immediate manager and they have this look on their face like, "I can't do anything about it". But who knows...

I do know the county was investigated by the FBI in 2018, the county commissioners more specifically. They then tried to fire the county manager and he was protected under the whistle blowers protection. They ended up having to pay him $250,000 just to quit. Makes you wonder if the real problem is coming from the top.

I don't think any of the kids have civil rights violations. The leniency they show kids in detention is half the problem from what I see. The other half being their parents.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:48 AM   #12
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They used to do exit interviews, especially with employees who were with the organization for several years.



I know several people who had 10+ years and no exit interview was given.


My former MegaCorp had no face to face exit interview. They did have an online questionnaire on their internal website. That seemed strange...
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:51 AM   #13
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They probably know already and either agree with you, or don't care (because they're part of the problem). Ending the practice of exit interviews usually happens when they want to stop hearing all the ways they're messed up.

Anyone high up enough to enact change will only see major signs, like the rats leaving the sinking ship. Be a rat.

I would recommend, however, that if there are any civil rights violations of the juveniles at your facility, that you blow the whistle.
Only thing is the rats have been leaving for a long time. And no ones gives a crap lol.

The booming economy isn't helping either. With unemployment so low it's hard for a lot of employers to find employees, especially if it doesn't pay very well.
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Old 02-10-2019, 07:40 AM   #14
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What ever method you decide it won't matter a week after you are gone. I realize how important that place is to you and your time there was valued greatly, so an exit seems very important, but it really isn't.

I would just tell your boss, I would also talk very well of your place of work, no need to run it down. Speak well of the place and it's people or don't speak at all. I went out on a high note even though I could of picked the place apart. I wanted the good memories didn't want to ponder on the bad time there.
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Old 02-10-2019, 07:48 AM   #15
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My resignation letter to my bosses was brief and non-critical. All I told them was that I was retiring and listed my last day. The only question they asked was if it was anything medical. It wasn't (although being sick........of the commute didn't count!).

In my lengthy exit interview with an HR flunkie, I went into more detail with the reasons I was leaving including my criticisms of corporate policy which contributed to my leaving (beyond the hated commute).

At the small gathering at my desk on the last day, I had only praise for my bosses and coworkers, as my reasons for leaving had nothing to do with them.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:39 AM   #16
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A tough call. I discussed a similar situation not long ago with a person very much in your position. Also a government organization that was operated much like your description. For example, one employee on a regular basis would schedule leave with a vacation day, sick day, vacation day. The manager accepted the leave as requested. And that was just the tip of the iceberg.

In the end, your management knows what is happening and they are participating. I think it comes down to your desire to help create the change that is required for those well meaning employees and especially the clients left behind. I expect the clients are taking the biggest brunt of the poor employee behavior. That would be the key reason for writing the letter. Perhaps, one day it will improve client delivery if your letter makes it to the files. Deciding how and where in the organization you want to present it might be important. Good luck, not an easy decision.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:47 AM   #17
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During my career I think I wrote almost 10 letters of resignation. There's no point in saying anything more than "I'm leaving on such-and-such a date" and something like "thanks for the opportunity blah blah." I've seen letters that ran on for pages detailing what the employee thought was wrong with the company, etc., but that only annoys the employer. They really don't care what you have to say about them, regardless of what they say to the contrary. In my later years I learned not to waste my time participating in exit interviews as well. They will nod their heads as you speak but after you leave they will all tell each other how you were wrong and there's nothing that needs to change with how they are doing business.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:52 AM   #18
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I was in a great Megacorp and watched it deteriorate over the last 5-6 years of my employment. I'd been beaten down and was sick of it. The last straw was my VP going batty at me, yelling. In 29 years nobody had ever yelled, it wasn't part of the culture.

Two weeks later I retired, I'd planned on OMY, no way was I staying in the new hostile environment. I smiled my entire way out the door. My resignation letter was a void of my true feelings, exit interview the same. Any comments I made were not going to change anything. It's gotten much worse on the almost 6 years since I left. I'm sure thousands of people have complained to no avail.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:57 AM   #19
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Boss,
This letter is to inform you of my resignation from the company. My last day will be two weeks from today.
Sincerely,
Tykimeister
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Old 02-10-2019, 09:25 AM   #20
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Boss,
This letter is to inform you of my resignation from the company. My last day will be two weeks from today.
Sincerely,
Tykimeister
This is as long as it needs to be. Do not say anything in an exit interview or survey.
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