Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Invisalign?
Old 12-15-2019, 12:45 PM   #1
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,477
Invisalign?

Has anyone done adult orthodontia using Invisalign? I am considering it, and wishing I knew someone who'd done it.

My front teeth came in straight, but my bottom teeth were crowded. Since they were on the bottom and didn't show, I never had orthodontia.

Over the years, the incisors have gotten so crooked that they have actually broken off the bottoms of my top incisors, which are rather long anyway. I had the top teeth repaired with bonding several times, until a new dentist refused to do another bonding until I got the bottom teeth straightened. He said there was no point to it, and I could see what he meant. He said I was a good Invisalign candidate because they probably could make enough straightening room by slightly shaving the enamel - rather than extracting a tooth.

So my concern is this: My adult teeth are obviously going to be worn down with many years of chewing. If they are straightened now, won't they meet incorrectly when I chew? The Invisalign 3-D modeling looks pretty but it doesn't indicate new chewing patterns.

Does anyone have any experiences to share?
Thank you!
__________________

__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.’ Christopher Morley.
It involved a mannequin hand, and an electric shaver taped to a golf club! - "The Other Guys"
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-15-2019, 01:18 PM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Coronado
Posts: 1,662
Yes, I did it last year. I started around March 2018 and I got my final retainers just about a year ago. I did have orthodontia as a teen, so I already had enough room (they pulled 4 perm teeth back then). I had stopped wearing my retainers in my mid-20s, and the bottom teeth were noticeably crooked again. I decided to do it because I was getting some odd wear patterns on my teeth and the dentist recommended a night guard. He pointed out that invisaligners would serve the same purpose if I was interested in having the teeth straightened, and I thought about it and decided to go ahead.

The invisalign process is pretty straightforward. They bonded 5 small "buttons" to various teeth so that the aligners would have something to push against, then I wore each set of trays for 2 weeks and saw the dentist every 6 weeks. I had 18 trays, so 36 weeks. There was a day or so of achiness each time I switched trays, but overall, it was much less painful than having braces. I wore the retainers full time for 6 months and am now wearing them only at night for the rest of my life.

The hardest part was that you can't drink anything other than water with the trays in. I like to keep a mug of tea handy while I'm reading or surfing the Internet and I had to switch to drinking tea with breakfast, and water at other times, which was just not the same. Also I felt like I was brushing my teeth in public restrooms a lot, which was a little weird. For example, if you go out for lunch and a movie, you have to put the trays back in before you can get home, so you've got to bring a travel toothbrush everywhere you go. I am glad that part is over.

Quote:
So my concern is this: My adult teeth are obviously going to be worn down with many years of chewing. If they are straightened now, won't they meet incorrectly when I chew? The Invisalign 3-D modeling looks pretty but it doesn't indicate new chewing patterns.
Once I had the final alignment, my dentist did test my bite with some little paper strips and he ground down a couple of molars very slightly to get a tighter closure. I don't notice any difference in chewing now than I had before the process started.
__________________

cathy63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 01:26 PM   #3
Moderator
MBAustin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6,135
I did it two years ago. Never had braces as a child, but should have. General crowdedness and crookedness with a bad bite. I had 26 trays which would normally take a year, but my dentist had me wear most of the sets only 1 week so I finished in about 9 months, then wore the last set of trays full time for another few months before getting retainers, which I wear at night.

Interesting that my dentist was fine with me drinking anything I wanted while wearing the trays unlike cathy63's dentist. Just removed them for eating.

Very glad I did it. My dentist is a fanatic about bite alignment and did several minor bite adjustments after I finished Invisalign. Hopefully the improved bite will help preserve my teeth.
__________________
"One of the funny things about the stock market is that every time one person buys, another sells, and both think they are astute." William Feather
----------------------------------
ER'd Oct. 2010 at 53. Life is good.
MBAustin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 02:27 PM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Ready's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 2,988
My dentist reminds me about Invisalign every time I see him. But I can't get past the idea of having to wear them all day and night, and having to brush my teeth every time I eat something. How do I try the Costco samples with these things on? Every time I go shopping there I'd have to either pass up every sample or run to the bathroom to brush my teeth. I feel like I'd constantly be weighing how much I want to eat something versus how much hassle it will be when I'm done.

It just seemed like too much of a lifestyle inconvenience to me to go through with it.
Ready is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 03:04 PM   #5
Dryer sheet aficionado
ATX78701's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: South Texas
Posts: 47
I have metal braces currently. In March 2018 I started with Invisalign on the top and metal on the bottom. I had open bite, twisted crowded teeth. Ortho said that Invisalign would not work on the bottom teeth. I was switched after a few months to metal braces on the uppers, too. I had an overbite and really needed surgery to reset my teeth. I’m now post op after double jaw surgery and am happy with the result. However, I was at dentist last week for first checkup and told him about difficulty learning to chew again with the new jaw placement. I was told that my teeth are where they should be but many don’t touch because of the decades of using the wrong teeth to chew based on my old jaw formation. I’ll be in braces for a couple of months more and then the dentist will do cosmetic veneers and crowns to size my teeth so that they work in the new and correct position.

My advice - if you dentist is the one pushing Invisaligns, go to an orthodontist and get their opinion. Find an ortho that has a machine that can can your entire bite so that you can then visual see what you are dealing with. I’m glad I used an ortho versus a dentist as the ortho works with braces all day long whereas the dentist IMO sees it as side revenue.
ATX78701 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 03:36 PM   #6
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OldShooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: City
Posts: 4,628
The fact is that a dentist in solo or a small practice is a commissioned salesperson who really believes in his/her product. Hence, the moral hazard: Is the product being recommended a good idea of the patient? It is already certain that it is a good idea for the dentist. Will the dentist try to ignore self-interest in making a recommendation? Hopefully, but even the dentist might not know.

I finally solved this problem by switching to the dental school clinic at the local university. I am cared for by a 4th or 5th year student who is under near-continuous supervision by faculty dentists. Every single step my student dentist takes involves a pause, a light switched on to summon the faculty member, and a review. Also, none of the participants have any economic interest in recommending work and, as a dental school they have access to all the latest techniques and have objectively evaluated them.

Appointments are time-consuming due to all the checks and re-checks but my compensation for that is a cost that is maybe 1/3 of street price. I have heard, too, that some university dental clinics are free.

Re orthodontist vs regular dentist, the same moral hazard pertains. I would go with the specialist orthodontist, however, once I had determined a course of action.
OldShooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 04:20 PM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Coronado
Posts: 1,662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ready View Post
My dentist reminds me about Invisalign every time I see him. But I can't get past the idea of having to wear them all day and night, and having to brush my teeth every time I eat something. How do I try the Costco samples with these things on? Every time I go shopping there I'd have to either pass up every sample or run to the bathroom to brush my teeth. I feel like I'd constantly be weighing how much I want to eat something versus how much hassle it will be when I'm done.

It just seemed like too much of a lifestyle inconvenience to me to go through with it.
That's called the Invisalign diet. Google it, it's a real thing!

Actually, Costco samples are not much of a problem though. Unless you're only buying non-refrigerated items, you'll probably be heading home after shopping and can brush then. You do need to carry a purse or some other bag to hold the trays and their case since the size of the case makes it not very pocket friendly.
cathy63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 06:05 PM   #8
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,477
I am this side of underweight...the last thing I need is a "diet," lol. Will just have to be sure to eat more than I want at each meal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathy63 View Post
That's called the Invisalign diet. Google it, it's a real thing!
__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.’ Christopher Morley.
It involved a mannequin hand, and an electric shaver taped to a golf club! - "The Other Guys"
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 06:10 PM   #9
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,477
Am not really sure what to think about this.

The dentist who recommended the procedure, was at the practice in MD where we have been going for 20+ years. He is not an orthodontist, but they had one on staff. I am sure that if he thought I needed traditional orthodontia, he would have steered me toward the orthodontist, since it's all the same practice and they share procedures among their specialists as appropriate.

The practice we use in Florida is Aspen Dental, a chain which accepts our dental insurance. The practice does cosmetic dentistry and dentures, but I do not think they do traditional braces. Notably, the dentist at Aspen didn't bring up Invisalign; I did. He had the 3D scan done but hasn't pressured me to get going on the treatment, nor has the front office. Contrast that with their "emergency" attitude toward my husband's bridge. The dentist suspected, and it turned out to be the case that Mr. A. was developing an infection and was on the verge of losing the ability to get a new bridge. It was saved just in time.

While I'm sure they are happy to take my money, and my insurance company's, I don't feel I'm being "sold" anything. But I'm going to bring up the bite issue at my next visit, before they actually order an Invisalign kit for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldShooter View Post
The fact is that a dentist in solo or a small practice is a commissioned salesperson who really believes in his/her product. Hence, the moral hazard: Is the product being recommended a good idea of the patient? It is already certain that it is a good idea for the dentist. Will the dentist try to ignore self-interest in making a recommendation? Hopefully, but even the dentist might not know.

.
__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.’ Christopher Morley.
It involved a mannequin hand, and an electric shaver taped to a golf club! - "The Other Guys"
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 06:53 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OldShooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: City
Posts: 4,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amethyst View Post
...While I'm sure they are happy to take my money, and my insurance company's, I don't feel I'm being "sold" anything. ...
Well, that's good. My point is not that all dentists are huckseters; it is that the moral hazard exists. Actually it is similar for veterinarians who cheerfully sell you the drugs they prescribe, the special food they recommend and offer to do the regular $100 dog teeth brushing that is supposedly needed these days.

Caveat emptor.
OldShooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 07:22 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,477
Well, it is needed, and for cats, too, but fortunately, you can do it yourself if your pet will let you. With our last cat, the vet showed us how to rub her teeth with a little nubby finger cot, like an old-fashioned page turner, and sold us one along with chicken-flavored toothpaste (mint is bad for cats and dogs). Later, I was able to buy these supplies online.

The idea (popular in my mom's day) that eating dry kibble will keep their teeth clean is out of date, I'm afraid. Critters get tooth decay and gum disease just like we do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldShooter View Post
the regular $100 dog teeth brushing that is supposedly needed these days.

.
__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.’ Christopher Morley.
It involved a mannequin hand, and an electric shaver taped to a golf club! - "The Other Guys"
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 06:04 AM   #12
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DrRoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,130
DW is just finishing up her last set and is pretty satisfied.
__________________
"The mountains are calling, and I must go." John Muir
DrRoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2019, 06:35 AM   #13
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Badger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1,518
My wife just completed her procedure and her teeth look perfect. She is so happy with the results. Now she just has to wear a retainer at night to keep them straight. I would like to have mine look so nice but I'm opting for another implant instead.
I think she said it was around $3.5k without insurance and takes anywhere from 6 months to a year. That included the procedure and some bonding.


Cheers!
Badger is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2019, 07:48 AM   #14
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,477
I'm so glad things worked out well for your wife!

We have managed to move from one HCOL area to another, so the no-insurance price would be around $5000.00. With insurance, it will be $2850. Worth it to be able to get my top front teeth fixed. My smile is such that all you see are my top front teeth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Badger View Post
My wife just completed her procedure and her teeth look perfect. She is so happy with the results. Now she just has to wear a retainer at night to keep them straight. I would like to have mine look so nice but I'm opting for another implant instead.
I think she said it was around $3.5k without insurance and takes anywhere from 6 months to a year. That included the procedure and some bonding.


Cheers!
__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.’ Christopher Morley.
It involved a mannequin hand, and an electric shaver taped to a golf club! - "The Other Guys"
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2019, 09:10 AM   #15
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
zinger1457's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,353
If the teeth you're trying to straighten out are not in the best of shape dental crowns might be a good option. My two lower canines were a little crooked, the other lower front teeth were not in the best of shape from fillings. Had the lower six front teeth capped when on an overseas trip to Thailand, cost around $1500. That was over 5 years ago and they still look and feel great.
zinger1457 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2019, 09:28 AM   #16
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,477
The crooked bottom teeth never show, even when I laugh. All you'd ever see is the front incisors and a glimpse of the front teeth on either side. The problem with the bottom teeth is a mechanical one, related to crowding and jawbone loss with age.


Quote:
Originally Posted by zinger1457 View Post
If the teeth you're trying to straighten out are not in the best of shape dental crowns might be a good option. My two lower canines were a little crooked, the other lower front teeth were not in the best of shape from fillings. Had the lower six front teeth capped when on an overseas trip to Thailand, cost around $1500. That was over 5 years ago and they still look and feel great.
__________________

__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.’ Christopher Morley.
It involved a mannequin hand, and an electric shaver taped to a golf club! - "The Other Guys"
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
adult orthodontia, dental, invisalign, teeth


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Invisalign braces summer2007 Health and Early Retirement 6 10-29-2008 06:09 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:30 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×