Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-26-2019, 03:04 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 9,777
I'm sorry you're still having issues and pain. I remember your saying the doctors warned you this might happen, due to the nature of your injury.

While it doesn't surprise me to learn that many people would prefer to accept an unusual gait rather than get hip surgery (I personally dread surgery), it is a contrast to many posts I've come across, by people who've had hip or knee surgery, and say everything is great now.

Parkinsons is an issue I hadn't thought of. It must take real courage for many of these folks to get up and go to the gym.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronc879 View Post
I just crossed the 8 month mark post hip replacement. I am still having pain and gait issues and i'm in my late 30's. Recovery would presumably be harder for an older person. I can see holding of on any major surgery for as long as possible. If they can modify their walk to reduce pain to a tolerable level then i'm in favor of it. No guarantee a hip replacement will end with a better result than they have now.
__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success to be able to spend your life in your own way. Christopher Morley.
It involved a mannequin hand, and an electric shaver taped to a golf club! - "The Other Guys"
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-26-2019, 03:10 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amethyst View Post
I'm sorry you're still having issues and pain. I remember your saying the doctors warned you this might happen, due to the nature of your injury.

While it doesn't surprise me to learn that many people would prefer to accept an unusual gait rather than get hip surgery (I personally dread surgery), it is a contrast to many posts I've come across, by people who've had hip or knee surgery, and say everything is great now.

Parkinsons is an issue I hadn't thought of. It must take real courage for many of these folks to get up and go to the gym.
There is a very wide range of recovery possibilities from joint replacement. You could be pain free with no gait issues after 3 months or you could have chronic pain and/or need an assistive device forever or anywhere in between. I have recovered less than ideal but not as bad as many.
aaronc879 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 03:55 PM   #23
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 683
That loss of flexibility in feet was new to me. I had never thought about feet being "flexible" nor how to lose that flexibilty or how to keep it. Is it just a question of periodically flexing one's feet?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
I was going to say fear of falling, but found this:

10 most common reasons seniors shuffle when they walk
  1. Weak hips and leg muscles
  2. Arthritis pain in joints
  3. Loss of flexibility in feet making it hard to flex them normally
  4. Decreased ability to maintain balance
  5. Decreased vision making it hard to see
  6. Fear because of a recent stumble or fall
  7. Slow reaction time when unbalanced which increases fear of falling
  8. Medication side effects
  9. Worn or poorly-fitting shoes or slippers
  10. Slippery floors
I didn't include the link because it's riddled with pop-ups and ads. You're welcome.
__________________
FIRED:
July 12, 2018. On safari to stay!
Pellice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 06:20 PM   #24
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 1,156
I'm proud of my purposeful stride, and make an (unconcious) effort to keep my feet pointed straight, and not side slapping like I see so many do.

6 years ago, I was driving through a county road intersection (doing 60 mph), and was hit by a drunk driver who was also doing 60+ on the passenger side of my Porsche 944. Needless to say, I lost that battle, and ended up with a shattered pelvis, ribs, foot, and sternum 17 breaks in all. I spent the next 5.5 months learning to walk again, along with having blood clots in both legs from inactivity, and was still limping when I went back to work. I decided that I wasn't going to look the part, and corrected my gate, so today, no one would ever suspect that I have a plate, with multiple pins in my hip.
ckelly78z is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 06:41 PM   #25
Moderator Emeritus
aja8888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 12,382
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckelly78z View Post
I'm proud of my purposeful stride, and make an (unconcious) effort to keep my feet pointed straight, and not side slapping like I see so many do.

6 years ago, I was driving through a county road intersection (doing 60 mph), and was hit by a drunk driver who was also doing 60+ on the passenger side of my Porsche 944. Needless to say, I lost that battle, and ended up with a shattered pelvis, ribs, foot, and sternum 17 breaks in all. I spent the next 5.5 months learning to walk again, along with having blood clots in both legs from inactivity, and was still limping when I went back to work. I decided that I wasn't going to look the part, and corrected my gate, so today, no one would ever suspect that I have a plate, with multiple pins in my hip.
Great to hear about your recovery. That must have been tough!

I'm 75 and had a hip replacement 10 years ago and two years ago tore both meniscuses in my right knee (surgery 6/2017). This month I am averaging about 9,000 walking steps per day and I have a normal stride. There is absolutely no problem with my gait. I plan to stay this way as long as I can and will do what it takes.

One of my ROMEO buddies shuffles when he walks. He is 70 and has many things wrong with him, including two knee replacements, "dropped toes" (whatever that is), diabetes, spinal issues, and he is very overweight. It's amazing how one can get into trouble, health wise, when they let themselves go for decades (like this guy did).
__________________
Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth...philosopher Mike Tyson
aja8888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 06:51 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ugeauxgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Rural Alabama
Posts: 1,151
Years ago I read (somewhere) that the reason older folks "shuffle" is that when you are younger, your brain and eyes are able to adjust your vision so that when you walk, your vision doesn't seem to "bounce." The older you get, the less that happens. So older folks tend to smooth their gait so that their head doesn't move as much when they walk, keeping their visual picture more stable.
__________________
Projected retirement--2020 at age 48 (done!)
ugeauxgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 07:09 PM   #27
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 315
There is a guy at work that does it, been doing it 10 years and he is maybe 55 if not younger.
I notice a lot of older women waddle.
ransil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 07:20 PM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Lakewood90712's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,193
Parkinson's . Although my dad went from normal walking, to falling down, to no mobility at all in about 60 days. Never went through the shuffle stage. What was explained to me is the body tries to use alternate brain areas to compensate for lost brain functions. Have a lot , both sides of the family tree.
Lakewood90712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 07:55 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 28,697
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pellice View Post
That loss of flexibility in feet was new to me. I had never thought about feet being "flexible" nor how to lose that flexibilty or how to keep it. Is it just a question of periodically flexing one's feet?
Yoga!

It quite actively involves the feet in various poses. And some interesting foot transition movements like tucking under toes and lifting up off the balls of the feet from kneeling into another position (downward dog), or pressing the tops of the feet into the floor and then rolling onto the balls of the feet from an upward dog or cobra pose to downward dog.

Not to mention yoga in general incorporating strength, balance, flexibility, breathing, etc.

Seriously, I started learning yoga at 40 figuring I would really need it as I got older, and now almost 20 years later I can see that I really do need it and need to be more disciplined about practicing yoga as post-menopause flexibity dropped quite suddenly.
__________________
Retired since summer 1999.
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 08:49 PM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 12,880
Here's the Parkinson's gait:

__________________
Al
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2019, 06:41 AM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 9,777
That's not what I've seen so far. No trembling, etc.

The gait I've observed is: bent over and peering (typical as we age and our eyesight fades), and rapid, tiny, yet firm steps. Actually it's surprising how fast some can move, which is why I thought of a toddler.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
Here's the Parkinson's gait:

__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success to be able to spend your life in your own way. Christopher Morley.
It involved a mannequin hand, and an electric shaver taped to a golf club! - "The Other Guys"
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2019, 07:44 AM   #32
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
donheff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 10,311
I suspect people with a gait as pronounced as the video are suffering from a variety of the problems in Midpack's list. I think the upper torso forward tilt is common with hip and lower back arthritis. I am 70 and work out regularly, including about 100 miles of cycling a week in good weather but I have recently noticed a tendency to tilt forward. I have mild arthritis in my lower back and hips and my body instinctively moves to alleviate the discomfort even though it is very mild. I am doing exercise to increase flexibility and range of motion and make a concerted effort to stand straight. So far, so good. I will check back in at 80
__________________
Every man is, or hopes to be, an Idler. -- Samuel Johnson
donheff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2019, 08:47 AM   #33
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
MRG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 9,730
There's a number of gait issues. I guess I feel fortunate to not know this. The example of Parkinson's is pretty close to how I see these folks having to walk.


https://stanfordmedicine25.stanford.edu/the25/gait.html

Gait Abnormalities

There are eight basic pathological gaits that can be attributed to neurological conditions: hemiplegic, spastic diplegic, neuropathic, myopathic, Parkinsonian, choreiform, ataxic (cerebellar) and sensory. Observation of these gait are an important aspect of diagnosis that may provide information about several musculoskeletal and neurological conditions.
MRG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2019, 09:14 AM   #34
Administrator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: N. Yorkshire
Posts: 28,689
My Dad's shuffling gait started in his mid 70's due to Peripheral Artery Disease caused by a lifetime of being a heavy smoker. He said his legs hurt a lot while walking and over time the poor blood flow led to ulceration.

He also became very hard of hearing but refused hearing aids. My sister lived next door to him and was his carer for the last few years of his life (he died at 84 of a burst aneurysm). One day she went into his house carrying a tray with his dinner to find him sat in his chair with his feet in a bowl of water and his leg dressings and ointments out ready. "What are doing?", asked my sister. "You said you would be in at 6 to do my gammy legs.", he replied. "I said I would bring you gammon and eggs at 6", she explained.
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Enough private pension and SS income to cover all needs
Alan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2019, 06:47 PM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
iloveyoga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Des Moines
Posts: 882
Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
Yoga!

It quite actively involves the feet in various poses. And some interesting foot transition movements like tucking under toes and lifting up off the balls of the feet from kneeling into another position (downward dog), or pressing the tops of the feet into the floor and then rolling onto the balls of the feet from an upward dog or cobra pose to downward dog.

Not to mention yoga in general incorporating strength, balance, flexibility, breathing, etc.

Seriously, I started learning yoga at 40 figuring I would really need it as I got older, and now almost 20 years later I can see that I really do need it and need to be more disciplined about practicing yoga as post-menopause flexibity dropped quite suddenly.
+1 I love yoga!
__________________
Retired in 2013 and we are living the dream!
iloveyoga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2019, 07:57 AM   #36
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
DFW_M5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: DFW
Posts: 6,354
Training that focuses on mobility to improve flexibility, range of motion, and joint/muscle strength should help a lot, although that is unlikely to overcome the effects of parkinsons and other neurological disorders, but it might help a lot.
__________________
Doing things today that others won't, to do things tomorrow that others can't. Of course I'm referring to workouts, not robbing banks.
DFW_M5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2019, 08:18 AM   #37
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Everett
Posts: 997
My mom, 89, walks as though she's stepping on slippery rocks to cross a stream, looking very tipsy and uncertain. She's always had poor balance and has taken numerous falls, many when she was much younger. She's banged her head four times, needing 4 and 15 stitches the last two times. Several doctors have recommended that she try some balance exercises or take Tai Chi classes or something of that sort. She saw a neurologist a few months ago and he pointed out that she had an odd gait. But she just lets it all roll off her, saying that they just like to give her a bad time about something, as though they're only teasing.
O2Bfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2019, 09:42 AM   #38
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: warren
Posts: 822
Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
I see this a lot. I attribute it to lack of flexibility. I see folks walking rocking from side to side. I also see folks out walking with their torso pushed forward. It seems like lack of flexibility in hips and perhaps also lower back.

Seems pretty common. At least they are out walking!!!
I agree. Loss of flexibility makes making a longer stride impossible, hence the short shuffle steps. I'm sure there are othe reasons, but in otherwise healthy seniors I'd say the vast majority is loss of flexibility.
garyt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2019, 07:48 PM   #39
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
simple girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,902
A shuffling, festinating gait pattern is often typical when individuals have Parkinson's. It's a motor control (neurological) issue.

Poor foot clearance can also be due to tight calves and weak dorsiflexors.

Wide based gait is often due to poor balance - multiple causes.

A gait which is waddling side to side is often due to hip weakness.
__________________
simple girl
less stuff, more time

(53, married; Mr. Simple Girl, 57. I am semi-retired as of 2015 (occasional part-time self-employment), Mr. Simple Girl is fully retired as of 12/31/19!)
simple girl is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2019, 10:09 AM   #40
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Laurel, MD
Posts: 5,744
OP specifically mentioned men (I think) so I'm wondering if any of the responses and likely symptoms are gender specific?
__________________
...with no reasonable expectation for ER, I'm just here auditing the AP class.Retired 8/1/15.
jazz4cash is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
disability, older adults, toddling gait


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1 in 100 adults in prison in USA bright eyed Other topics 31 03-27-2008 08:26 AM
Starting a business talking to young adults about finances? dandan14 Young Dreamers 38 01-20-2007 09:37 PM
"Global Giving" - Great website for donating to good causes - thoughts? justin Other topics 3 06-30-2006 09:47 AM
Roth IRA for young adults Sam FIRE and Money 19 06-02-2006 10:14 PM
What causes inflation? Rich_by_the_Bay FIRE and Money 27 04-18-2006 10:20 AM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:55 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.