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-   -   Recommendation for Electric Smoker (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f29/recommendation-for-electric-smoker-104292.html)

Rustic23 06-26-2020 03:13 PM

Meekie, I ask what the paprika was far, and the answer, "you get a better smoke ring!" Nothing like a little red dye!

24601NoMore 06-26-2020 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuirWannabe (Post 2447089)
Hereís a pic of some just off the smoker beef ribs.
Attachment 35438

Those look amazing. Wife and I went to a work Christmas party at a restaurant several years ago, and they served those. HOLY COW. MEAT HEAVEN!

I've tried making them a few times, and have never gotten the hang of it, even though I can cook just about anything pretty well.

If you're comfortable sharing your technique and recipe, you'd be doing a fellow Q enthusiast a massive favor..

TIA..

24601NoMore 06-26-2020 03:30 PM

A great electric smoker is anything by Cookshack. I have their "Smokette Elite" (SM025) and it's a beast. Built like a tank, and would probably survive a nuclear holocaust. But more importantly, is a "set and forget" electric smoker. Put 2-4 oz of a good, hefty wood chunk or two in to the smoke box..set your temp. Load up the food, and insert the (included) probe so that you constantly monitor food temp.

Could not be easier. I also own a Big Green Egg (albeit, a Mini, which wouldn't suffice for smoking) and a Kamado Joe (large) which many people would use for smoking. But the ease of use of the SM025 over the KJ is LIGHT YEARS better. (For example, I don't need to load a ton of lump into the KJ, setup separate temp controllers and fans, and most likely reload the lump at some point during a long cook). Plus, I don't have to worry about potentially setting my deck on fire when I kick on the Cookshack, as the smoke box is totally contained and there's NO WAY even the smallest spark is ever getting out of the cook box. KJ with all that natural lump, flame and sparks? No way I'd leave that thing unattended on my wood deck, especially overnight.

IMHO, you can't go wrong with anything by Cookshack. They make commercial, competition-level and "enthusiast" gear. It's not cheap, but it will last you a lifetime. Hell, my SM025 will almost certainly outlive me. Nuclear war or not..(you'll know what I'm talking about if you ever see one..they just don't build things like Cookshacks any longer..)

PS: I just re-read the SM025 page and it mentions using "year round". Oh, yeah. I live in MI and have smoked Pork Butt, Ribs and Brisket on days with 16'' of snow on my deck, and the thermometer reading sub zero. The SM025 has more insulation than my house. And it's built out of (many layers) of solid metal. The thing is a BEAST and totally indestructible. You could probably run it just fine in the middle of the worst winter day in central Siberia, and it'd do JUST. FINE. and turn out some great Q.

As far as ELECTRIC smokers, you can't beat a Cookshack IMHO. That said, there's a whole passionate, religious discussion around Electric vs. Lump vs Stick Burners vs. Pellet Burners, etc..good luck!

ETA - the SM025 has a separately sold cart that it stacks on top of. Highly recommended, as the base unit would be low to the ground without this..they are also made entirely in the USA. I think they're welded (yeah, welded) together in Oklahoma, or somewhere similar where big, burly men rip large trees from the ground with their bare hands before wrestling down a buffalo or two for dinner.

MuirWannabe 06-26-2020 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 24601NoMore (Post 2447792)
Those look amazing. Wife and I went to a work Christmas party at a restaurant several years ago, and they served those. HOLY COW. MEAT HEAVEN!

I've tried making them a few times, and have never gotten the hang of it, even though I can cook just about anything pretty well.

If you're comfortable sharing your technique and recipe, you'd be doing a fellow Q enthusiast a massive favor..

TIA..


Honestly, theyíre a fairly straightforward cook. I do get the beef ribs from a butcher shop to ensure high quality meat. Rub them with lots of black pepper and coarse salt. Also, throw some garlic powder in the rub. Cause I always like a little garlic. Then, throw them on and let the smoke do itís thing. Iíll spritz with either water or apple juice every 45 minutes or so. Keep my smoker between 230-270. Takes several hours. Cook till the internal temperature reaches 203. I use pecan wood. Its got a nice mild flavor. But hickory or oak would do.

Let rest and then serve with your favorite bbq sauce on the side. They taste like the most savory roast meat ever. Your eyes will roll into the back of your head. Good luck next time. Itís been a while. Iíll try them soon no doubt. Enough talking..time to eat!

24601NoMore 06-26-2020 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuirWannabe (Post 2447810)
Honestly, they’re a fairly straightforward cook. I do get the beef ribs from a butcher shop to ensure high quality meat. Rub them with lots of black pepper and coarse salt. Also, throw some garlic powder in the rub. Cause I always like a little garlic. Then, throw them on and let the smoke do it’s thing. I’ll spritz with either water or apple juice every 45 minutes or so. Keep my smoker between 230-270. Takes several hours. Cook till the internal temperature reaches 203. I use pecan wood. Its got a nice mild flavor. But hickory or oak would do.

Let rest and then serve with your favorite bbq sauce on the side. They taste like the most savory roast meat ever. Your eyes will roll into the back of your head. Good luck next time. It’s been a while. I’ll try them soon no doubt. Enough talking..time to eat!

Thanks..I totally agree with the "your eyes will roll into the back of your head" description, as this is EXACTLY what I experienced when I had these prepared "properly". It was (hate to put it this way, but no equal way to describe) like the 'best sex you ever had' meat. BEYOND amazing. I will never forget that dinner. WHOAH!

Will give your technique a try next time I can get out of my COVID self-induced prison long enough to buy some..

ETA - I know there are multiple cuts of these things to request..what do you ask your butcher for?

audreyh1 06-26-2020 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuirWannabe (Post 2447810)
Honestly, theyíre a fairly straightforward cook. I do get the beef ribs from a butcher shop to ensure high quality meat. Rub them with lots of black pepper and coarse salt. Also, throw some garlic powder in the rub. Cause I always like a little garlic. Then, throw them on and let the smoke do itís thing. Iíll spritz with either water or apple juice every 45 minutes or so. Keep my smoker between 230-270. Takes several hours. Cook till the internal temperature reaches 203. I use pecan wood. Its got a nice mild flavor. But hickory or oak would do.

Let rest and then serve with your favorite bbq sauce on the side. They taste like the most savory roast meat ever. Your eyes will roll into the back of your head. Good luck next time. Itís been a while. Iíll try them soon no doubt. Enough talking..time to eat!

Yeah, pretty much same here on my Traeger. I do the Costco chuck short ribs that come 4 ribs together as a chunk. Salt and pepper rub. 250-275 thereabouts. Spritz hourly with cider vinegar after the first couple of hours. I also favor pecan. It usually takes at least 6 hours. Same target temp but probe to make sure that the meat gives easily between the ribs. Develops a gorgeous very dark bark - almost black. Absolutely delicious!

MuirWannabe 06-26-2020 04:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 24601NoMore (Post 2447830)
Thanks..I totally agree with the "your eyes will roll into the back of your head" description, as this is EXACTLY what I experienced when I had these prepared "properly". It was (hate to put it this way, but no equal way to describe) like the 'best sex you ever had' meat. BEYOND amazing. I will never forget that dinner. WHOAH!

Will give your technique a try next time I can get out of my COVID self-induced prison long enough to buy some..

ETA - I know there are multiple cuts of these things to request..what do you ask your butcher for?


I ask for beef short ribs Ďfrom the plateí. Not the chuck roast.

Bamaman 06-26-2020 07:55 PM

I have a Mastercraft but seldom use it because I'll have to then clean it. It's one heavy piece to move outside my screen porch to clean up.

After it croaks, I may install a Bradley Bisquette smoker in the Mastercraft that cooks using small pucks. They're very good.

My favorite smoker is the UDS--with plans off the internet available. They are made out of a 55 gallon metal food grade drum. Doesn't get any better than cooking over coals.

51notout 06-26-2020 07:56 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by 24601NoMore (Post 2447796)
A great electric smoker is anything by Cookshack. I have their "Smokette Elite" (SM025) and it's a beast. Built like a tank, and would probably survive a nuclear holocaust. But more importantly, is a "set and forget" electric smoker. Put 2-4 oz of a good, hefty wood chunk or two in to the smoke box..set your temp. Load up the food, and insert the (included) probe so that you constantly monitor food temp.


Could not agree more about Cookshack smokers. I bought my SM009-2 in 2012 and I cleaned it up this week up (to sell) after much usage.
Iím selling it since both kids moved out and DW doesnít like smoked meats [emoji30]

Attachment 35453

GoBears 06-26-2020 08:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 24601NoMore (Post 2447796)
A great electric smoker is anything by Cookshack. I have their "Smokette Elite" (SM025) and it's a beast. Built like a tank, and would probably survive a nuclear holocaust. But more importantly, is a "set and forget" electric smoker. Put 2-4 oz of a good, hefty wood chunk or two in to the smoke box..set your temp. Load up the food, and insert the (included) probe so that you constantly monitor food temp.

Could not be easier. I also own a Big Green Egg (albeit, a Mini, which wouldn't suffice for smoking) and a Kamado Joe (large) which many people would use for smoking. But the ease of use of the SM025 over the KJ is LIGHT YEARS better. (For example, I don't need to load a ton of lump into the KJ, setup separate temp controllers and fans, and most likely reload the lump at some point during a long cook). Plus, I don't have to worry about potentially setting my deck on fire when I kick on the Cookshack, as the smoke box is totally contained and there's NO WAY even the smallest spark is ever getting out of the cook box. KJ with all that natural lump, flame and sparks? No way I'd leave that thing unattended on my wood deck, especially overnight.

IMHO, you can't go wrong with anything by Cookshack. They make commercial, competition-level and "enthusiast" gear. It's not cheap, but it will last you a lifetime. Hell, my SM025 will almost certainly outlive me. Nuclear war or not..(you'll know what I'm talking about if you ever see one..they just don't build things like Cookshacks any longer..)

PS: I just re-read the SM025 page and it mentions using "year round". Oh, yeah. I live in MI and have smoked Pork Butt, Ribs and Brisket on days with 16'' of snow on my deck, and the thermometer reading sub zero. The SM025 has more insulation than my house. And it's built out of (many layers) of solid metal. The thing is a BEAST and totally indestructible. You could probably run it just fine in the middle of the worst winter day in central Siberia, and it'd do JUST. FINE. and turn out some great Q.

As far as ELECTRIC smokers, you can't beat a Cookshack IMHO. That said, there's a whole passionate, religious discussion around Electric vs. Lump vs Stick Burners vs. Pellet Burners, etc..good luck!

ETA - the SM025 has a separately sold cart that it stacks on top of. Highly recommended, as the base unit would be low to the ground without this..they are also made entirely in the USA. I think they're welded (yeah, welded) together in Oklahoma, or somewhere similar where big, burly men rip large trees from the ground with their bare hands before wrestling down a buffalo or two for dinner.

I also swear by Cookshack. We have had our smoker for 15+ years. It is still going strong. Stay up late, put the brisket in and just let it smoke. Chicken and ribs are done in 3.5 hours. Nothing easier. And some great recipes on their website.

24601NoMore 06-27-2020 06:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 51notout (Post 2447943)
Could not agree more about Cookshack smokers. I bought my SM009-2 in 2012 and I cleaned it up this week up (to sell) after much usage.
Iím selling it since both kids moved out and DW doesnít like smoked meats [emoji30]

Attachment 35453

Nice! That's a classic. If I remember right, the SM009 was the first "home use" smoker Cookshack made.

Love the weld marks in the upper right corner. Far as I know, these things are all built by hand. That's part of what makes them so insanely rugged.

A lot of my buddies are amazed I can run it mid winter, cuz a lot of them have the thin, non-insulated Chinese made stuff from Home Depot..I did see a SM025 torn apart once and the insulation in this thing is unbelievable. They literally jam multiple layers of thick, industrial insulation all around the inside of the smoker box..then close it up with thick, hefty metal. When I set my SM025 to 225..it STAYS at 225 - even in the middle of a snowstorm. Great stuff.

Red Badger 06-27-2020 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuirWannabe (Post 2447810)
Honestly, theyíre a fairly straightforward cook. I do get the beef ribs from a butcher shop to ensure high quality meat. Rub them with lots of black pepper and coarse salt. Also, throw some garlic powder in the rub. Cause I always like a little garlic. Then, throw them on and let the smoke do itís thing. Iíll spritz with either water or apple juice every 45 minutes or so. Keep my smoker between 230-270. Takes several hours. Cook till the internal temperature reaches 203. I use pecan wood. Its got a nice mild flavor. But hickory or oak would do.

Let rest and then serve with your favorite bbq sauce on the side. They taste like the most savory roast meat ever. Your eyes will roll into the back of your head. Good luck next time. Itís been a while. Iíll try them soon no doubt. Enough talking..time to eat!

+1. These (~8 pounds) took about 13 hours at 220 degrees. Wrapped 'em at 170 and they still stalled for about 2.5 hours. They were a tad spendy at $72 or $26 per bone, but worth every penny. :smitten:


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/9e...-no?authuser=0

Winemaker 06-27-2020 01:42 PM

On Thursday, my beloved plum tree fell over onto my rental house. I spent all day yesterday cutting, sawing, chipping and stacking. No harm to the house, but I have TONS of fresh plum wood available for BBQ's and smokers. It is as good, if not better than apple.

51notout 06-27-2020 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 24601NoMore (Post 2448016)
Nice! That's a classic. If I remember right, the SM009 was the first "home use" smoker Cookshack made.

Love the weld marks in the upper right corner. Far as I know, these things are all built by hand. That's part of what makes them so insanely rugged.

A lot of my buddies are amazed I can run it mid winter, cuz a lot of them have the thin, non-insulated Chinese made stuff from Home Depot..I did see a SM025 torn apart once and the insulation in this thing is unbelievable. They literally jam multiple layers of thick, industrial insulation all around the inside of the smoker box..then close it up with thick, hefty metal. When I set my SM025 to 225..it STAYS at 225 - even in the middle of a snowstorm. Great stuff.



And they still make them. I checked the Cookshack website...$700 for the exact model...SM009-2. Itís a quality product and produces quality smoked food [emoji3]. *sigh*

MuirWannabe 06-27-2020 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Red Badger (Post 2448169)
+1. These (~8 pounds) took about 13 hours at 220 degrees. Wrapped 'em at 170 and they still stalled for about 2.5 hours. They were a tad spendy at $72 or $26 per bone, but worth every penny. :smitten:





https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/9e...-no?authuser=0


Thatís it. I canít take it. Iím buying some and planning a beef rib cook for July 4th weekend. Family is coming over. Should be fun.

braumeister 06-27-2020 03:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuirWannabe (Post 2448247)
Thatís it. I canít take it. Iím buying some and planning a beef rib cook for July 4th weekend. Family is coming over. Should be fun.

Thanks for the thought. I hadn't decided what to make in the Egg for Independence Day, and I think I'll join you in that endeavour. There's not much better than beef ribs.

Stormy Kromer 06-28-2020 11:24 AM

I've got a Bighorn pellet grill/smoker (a poorman's Traeger) I use Traeger pellets and use it as a grill & smoker.


I love it. I've been catching a lot of big lake trout and it does an excellent job on them.


Tonight it's grilled chicken with Traeger Big Game rub. Very versatile rig.

audreyh1 06-28-2020 11:27 AM

Oh please give us your smoked (or grilled) trout recipe!!!

skipro33 06-28-2020 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 24601NoMore (Post 2447796)
A great electric smoker is anything by Cookshack. I have their "Smokette Elite" (SM025) and it's a beast.


Ditto. It takes very little wood to get the smoke flavor because it's sealed. Also, meat stays moist, again because it's sealed with just a little hole to let air in and another to vent out. Maybe the size of my thumb.

This thing makes me look like a hero when, in fact, there's literally nothing to do; season meat, toss into smoker, turn on and let it set for the allotted time. No peeking! Pork butts come out so tender, they shake like a jello mold. No more dried out brisket. Ribs are fall-off-the-bone tender. Turkey is the best!

Find their forum website and read up on how to use, meet others with this same SM025 smoker and their uses.

I also use mine to smoke almonds, cold smoke cheese, flavor veggies by setting in the smoker, off, for a couple hours just to absorb it's aroma. I cure my own hams and bacon as well, then hand out as gifts at Christmas time. Prime rib has to be the best though.

Stormy Kromer 06-29-2020 05:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by audreyh1 (Post 2448525)
Oh please give us your smoked (or grilled) trout recipe!!!

Take a piece of brown paper like the kind grocery bags are made of and cut it to fit the trout fillet. Wet it until it is soaked and place the trout fillet on it skin side down. I don't brine the fish at all, just take out a freshly cleaned fillet.

Put a light coating of olive oil on the meat side of the fillet then apply a light sprinkle of lemon pepper and an even lighter sprinkle of garlic powder. I'm sure your favorite sea food seasoning would be good, I like to keep it simple.

Have your smoker preheated to 250 and put it on there (with the paper under the skin) and close the lid. Grab a beverage and pretend your busy while attending it. Keep the lid closed.

How long it takes really depends on the size of your trout fillet. An average fillet from a 5 lb trout takes about an hour, maybe longer. I don't use a thermometer, just take it off the grill when the meat starts to flake and its warm to the touch. Keep it on the wet newspaper and the meat comes off nicely.

Eat it while its hot. Leftovers are good appetizers cold.

I got this method from an old charter boat captain in Duluth. Works on any kind of trout. I'm going to try it on a bass & pike sometime. (walleyes get fried in a cast iron skillet...that's another thread)


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