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-   -   The Photographers' Corner - 2021 to ? (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f29/the-photographers-corner-2021-to-107182.html)

aja8888 11-15-2021 08:17 PM

Toolman, great photos! What is the orange thing?

TOOLMAN 11-15-2021 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aja8888 (Post 2690039)
Toolman, great photos! What is the orange thing?



Balsam Apple

https://www.inaturalist.org/guide_taxa/594301

aja8888 11-15-2021 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TOOLMAN (Post 2690061)

Neat! Thanks.

Ronstar 11-16-2021 05:40 AM

Good pick of rare triplets Street!

Very nice shots Stepford and Toolman! What lenses do you use for your macro photos? (we might have gone over this before, but I forgot.)

Ronstar 11-16-2021 03:38 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Ran into this old guy chilling out

aja8888 11-16-2021 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronstar (Post 2690351)
Ran into this old guy chilling out

Is there a story with this photo?;D

stepford 11-16-2021 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronstar (Post 2690137)
Good pick of rare triplets Street!

Very nice shots Stepford and Toolman! What lenses do you use for your macro photos? (we might have gone over this before, but I forgot.)

About 20 years ago I ran through a bunch of different camera equipment, and in particular, tried out several different macro lenses. The 100mm macro lenses made by most manufacturers do quite well for most little critters. The exceptions, I found, were for:

A. Flying critters (which work better with a longer telephoto lens with a decently large magnification ratio) I use a 300mm lens (often with a 1.4x extender) for butterfly/moth/hummingbird shooting for this reason.

B. Really small creatures. Most macro lenses have a maximum magnification of 1:1 (meaning the image formed on the sensor is no larger than the size of the object in real life). Canon makes a specialty macro lens called the 65mm MP-E that goes up to a whopping 5:1 magnification that I've used for most of my bug shots for the last 15 or so years.

I love the MP-E, but it's a hard lens to use. No autofocus or image stabilization and depth of focus is razor thin. Really best if used on a tripod, but fun to try handheld nonetheless. Back when I had younger steadier hands I could routinely shoot the MP-E handheld at magnifications up to 3:1, but these days I rarely use it past about 1.5:1 and would probably be better served by one of the newer image stabilized 100mm macros.

Ronstar 11-16-2021 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aja8888 (Post 2690356)
Is there a story with this photo?;D

Somewhat. Buffalo Rock State Park near Ottawa Il has a fenced in pasture for bison. They had 2 last year, now 3. The fence is a 6' chain link that is tough to get photos through - the lens is bigger than the chain link openings.

This bison appears to be an old one. Couldn't get decent shots of the other 2. One charged the fence when I was leaning against the fence taking pics. Missed being gored by a few inches - the bison got its horns through the fence. I didn't see it coming because I was taking pics of the other 2.

Ronstar 11-16-2021 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stepford (Post 2690363)
About 20 years ago I ran through a bunch of different camera equipment, and in particular, tried out several different macro lenses. The 100mm macro lenses made by most manufacturers do quite well for most little critters. The exceptions, I found, were for:

A. Flying critters (which work better with a longer telephoto lens with a decently large magnification ratio) I use a 300mm lens (often with a 1.4x extender) for butterfly/moth/hummingbird shooting for this reason.

B. Really small creatures. Most macro lenses have a maximum magnification of 1:1 (meaning the image formed on the sensor is no larger than the size of the object in real life). Canon makes a specialty macro lens called the 65mm MP-E that goes up to a whopping 5:1 magnification that I've used for most of my bug shots for the last 15 or so years.

I love the MP-E, but it's a hard lens to use. No autofocus or image stabilization and depth of focus is razor thin. Really best if used on a tripod, but fun to try handheld nonetheless. Back when I had younger steadier hands I could routinely shoot the MP-E handheld at magnifications up to 3:1, but these days I rarely use it past about 1.5:1 and would probably be better served by one of the newer image stabilized 100mm macros.


Thanks! I have a 55mm Nikon micro lens similar to your Canon 65 mm. Manual focus, no image stabilization, but very sharp.

I was thinking about getting a 100mm macro, but I only shoot non living things in a macro (product photo) sense indoors. I think that most things I shoot are too big for me to shoot indoors at 100mm, so I'll stick with the 55mm although the manual focus is tiresome.

aja8888 11-16-2021 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronstar (Post 2690365)
Somewhat. Buffalo Rock State Park near Ottawa Il has a fenced in pasture for bison. They had 2 last year, now 3. The fence is a 6' chain link that is tough to get photos through - the lens is bigger than the chain link openings.

This bison appears to be an old one. Couldn't get decent shots of the other 2. One charged the fence when I was leaning against the fence taking pics. Missed being gored by a few inches - the bison got its horns through the fence. I didn't see it coming because I was taking pics of the other 2.

I was wondering where you took that photo. And lucky you didn't get gored!:)

braumeister 11-16-2021 04:30 PM

1 Attachment(s)
FWIW, my macro lens is kind of a compromise at 85 mm and I especially like that it has VR. I'm very happy with it, mainly because I'm just a casual photographer.
AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 85mm F3.5G ED VR

One of our recent 17-year cicadas:

Ronstar 11-16-2021 04:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by braumeister (Post 2690391)
FWIW, my macro lens is kind of a compromise at 85 mm and I especially like that it has VR. I'm very happy with it, mainly because I'm just a casual photographer.
AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 85mm F3.5G ED VR

One of our recent 17-year cicadas:

How close were you to the cicada?

swaneesr 11-16-2021 08:01 PM

You guys are really talented. Thank you for posting.

Swanee

AZflowers 11-16-2021 08:08 PM

Ronstar, that bison is a classic! Went shopping for our Thanksgiving today, and now that's pretty much how I feel...

TOOLMAN 11-16-2021 08:56 PM

The Photographers' Corner - 2021
 
I used these macro lens

AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED

M.ZUIKO ED 60MM F2.8 MACRO


I use these extreme macro lens

Venus Laowa 25mm f/2.8 2.5-5X Ultra-Macro

Beyond 5x I use microscope objective lens.

Anything beyond macro (1X) I use a focusing rail.

TOOLMAN 11-16-2021 09:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stepford (Post 2690363)
About 20 years ago I ran through a bunch of different camera equipment, and in particular, tried out several different macro lenses. The 100mm macro lenses made by most manufacturers do quite well for most little critters. The exceptions, I found, were for:

A. Flying critters (which work better with a longer telephoto lens with a decently large magnification ratio) I use a 300mm lens (often with a 1.4x extender) for butterfly/moth/hummingbird shooting for this reason.

B. Really small creatures. Most macro lenses have a maximum magnification of 1:1 (meaning the image formed on the sensor is no larger than the size of the object in real life). Canon makes a specialty macro lens called the 65mm MP-E that goes up to a whopping 5:1 magnification that I've used for most of my bug shots for the last 15 or so years.

I love the MP-E, but it's a hard lens to use. No autofocus or image stabilization and depth of focus is razor thin. Really best if used on a tripod, but fun to try handheld nonetheless. Back when I had younger steadier hands I could routinely shoot the MP-E handheld at magnifications up to 3:1, but these days I rarely use it past about 1.5:1 and would probably be better served by one of the newer image stabilized 100mm macros.


I agree with your conclusions.

For in flight macro I use:

Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM C

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

street 11-16-2021 09:47 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronstar (Post 2690351)
Ran into this old guy chilling out

Tatanka >> that is a great picture of an old warrior. Thanks for that Ronstar. For some reason, he still has and is shedding last years winter coat. Interesting!!

I saved a picture of a Tatonka, you shared with us a few years back on ER. It was a side profile and a beautiful bison in tall grass. I did ask permission to share that photo from Ronstar with a friend and I still have it saved. It is a great shot!!

TOOLMAN 11-16-2021 10:05 PM

2 Attachment(s)
"Macro" inflight with a telephoto

TOOLMAN 11-16-2021 10:08 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I use my maco Nikon AF-S VR Micro-NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED Lens
50% of the time for non macro shots. It's heavy glass but I love the lens.
Here is an example from about 30 feet away.

TOOLMAN 11-16-2021 10:42 PM

The Photographers' Corner - 2021
 
Old photographer jokes about people with good intentions ....







Someone says; That's a really good photo, then asks what camera did you use?



The photographer thinks; That's like me reading a really good novel and asking the author what brand of typewriter he used.





-------------------------------------------------

Someone says; That's a beautiful photo, it looks like a painting.



The photographer thinks; what would a painter say if you told him; that's beautiful, is that a photo.



:laugh:


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