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harllee 06-23-2021 10:35 AM

Retiring to a College Town
 
I retired to a college town and I really like it. I went to UNC-Chapel Hill and then taught a few courses there over the years and when we retired we moved to Chapel Hill about 10 years ago. We live about a block from campus and walk or bike to campus almost every day. There are so many fun and interesting things to do on campus and around town (thing are opening back up now from the Covid shut down). This week UNC is having a summer jazz festival, with free concerts every night. Last night I went to an outdoor jazz concert and it was great. Many people retire to this area so there are many events geared to seniors. There is a Medical School here and one at Duke 8 miles down the road so there is excellent medical care.

For those of you looking for a place to retire, I suggest you look at college towns.

friar1610 06-23-2021 11:01 AM

Have not actually lived in a college town. But for 8 years we lived in VT approximately midway between Burlington (U of VT) and Middlebury (Middlebury College). We certainly didn’t have the advantage of walking to a campus but attended many cultural and athletic events at both schools. I strongly second your suggestion.

MichaelB 06-23-2021 11:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harllee (Post 2624026)
For those of you looking for a place to retire, I suggest you look at college towns.

I agree. So many cultural options, lots of performing arts. College towns also have lots of good restaurants with a wide variety of ethic options.

finnski1 06-23-2021 11:20 AM

Just make sure you don't actually live near fraternities, sororities or off campus student housing. :) Otherwise I can see the benefits.

daylatedollarshort 06-23-2021 11:29 AM

I don't live in a college town but we live in an urban area with multiple colleges not too far away. We also find them to be amazing sources of activities for seniors. I sign up for some of their theater, dance, music and astronomy department Facebook pages. U.C. Berkeley in our area has two really nice public gardens with scenic bay views open to the general public. Berkeley also has an astronomy night once a month open to the public, plus both Berkeley and Stanford are good sources of interesting speakers for the local, community astronomy clubs. Our local community college has surprisingly good play productions.

KingOfTheCheapos 06-23-2021 11:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harllee (Post 2624026)
I retired to a college town and I really like it. I went to UNC-Chapel Hill and then taught a few courses there over the years and when we retired we moved to Chapel Hill about 10 years ago. We live about a block from campus and walk or bike to campus almost every day. There are so many fun and interesting things to do on campus and around town (thing are opening back up now from the Covid shut down). This week UNC is having a summer jazz festival, with free concerts every night. Last night I went to an outdoor jazz concert and it was great. Many people retire to this area so there are many events geared to seniors. There is a Medical School here and one at Duke 8 miles down the road so there is excellent medical care.

For those of you looking for a place to retire, I suggest you look at college towns.

That's a great suggestions. One that gets mentioned a lot but forgotten often.

KingOfTheCheapos 06-23-2021 11:37 AM

Is the Cost of Real Estate in College Towns Going Up or Down?
 
I'm curious whether this getting cheaper or more expensive? In the past I'd think it would be getting more expensive but with COVID and lots of colleges moving to on-line for 2020 and many keeping some online I see prices going down?

ShokWaveRider 06-23-2021 11:44 AM

We retired to a college town and like it.

harllee 06-23-2021 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by finnski1 (Post 2624049)
Just make sure you don't actually live near fraternities, sororities or off campus student housing. :) Otherwise I can see the benefits.

Actually I have 3 sorority houses on my block. The sororities rarely make a lot of noise late at night. Sometimes I hear some cheering, singing and laughter during rush week but it is over pretty early. On the other hand the fraternities can be loud--they sometimes have loud bands outside. Our town has a pretty good noise ordinance that starts at 10 pm and that helps.

I like being around young people, I think it is fun to watch and remember my own youth.

One other thing I like about being in a college town is the diversity. I hear many foreign languages while I walk around town (or I did before Covid). The town also seems more tolerant of different life styles than other towns on my state.

Koolau 06-23-2021 08:17 PM

There are several colleges and universities in Hawaii. Maybe I'm just getting old, but I don't see as much influence as I would expect for having so many schools and students. I suspect the tourist population washes out a lot of the influence. I do always know when U of H is out of session - traffic is bearable.

Bamaman 06-23-2021 08:54 PM

Like has been said, college towns are great places to retire to. They usually have decent restaurants, and cultural opportunities abound including sports, music programs and active theatre groups.

My university had a fraternity row where the houses looked nice from the street. Go inside and you quickly realize you've stepped into "Animal House." When that movie came out, I knew every person in it--including John Belusi's character. They were the brothers.

Many of the college towns now have condos developed by alumni for use on football weekends.

Nick12 06-23-2021 11:35 PM

Duke and UNC are bitter rivals especially in basketball, rarely you see anyone in Chapel Hill wearing a Duke shirt but Chapel Hill is a nice town. Down the road is Durham which has its sketchy parts near Duke.

harllee 06-24-2021 04:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick12 (Post 2624263)
Duke and UNC are bitter rivals especially in basketball, rarely you see anyone in Chapel Hill wearing a Duke shirt but Chapel Hill is a nice town. Down the road is Durham which has its sketchy parts near Duke.

Duke and UNC are bitter rivals in everything. When newcomers come to town they have to choose which side to be on, no middle ground. I am a UNC Tar Heel all the way but DH just had his knee replaced at Duke and they did a very good job. I use to think Durham had a lot of sketchy areas but more recently they have really cleaned up their act and now most of the city, including downtown and around the University are nicer and have good restaurants and nice cultural events.

Nick12 06-24-2021 05:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harllee (Post 2624281)
Duke and UNC are bitter rivals in everything. When newcomers come to town they have to choose which side to be on, no middle ground. I am a UNC Tar Heel all the way but DH just had his knee replaced at Duke and they did a very good job. I use to think Durham had a lot of sketchy areas but more recently they have really cleaned up their act and now most of the city, including downtown and around the University are nicer and have good restaurants and nice cultural events.

Most of Durham? Don't agree. Durham which is just a few miles from Chapel Hill still has high crime rates especially Lakewood which is adjacent to some of the expensive areas of Durham. Main street has continued to be cleaned up which is a good thing but Durham has a long way to go. When my relative went for his Duke MBA ( Fuqua ) we never ventured to Chapel Hill since like you said Duke and UNC are bitter rivals. That is so true.

molly312 06-24-2021 06:38 AM

We retired to Columbia, MO. City has wonderful parks, Katy Trail with spurs throughout the city, great health care and lots of activities. Not too crowded. University of Missouri, Stephens College, and Columbia College. We can hop on a trail and walk into town - never crossing a busy street (tunnels). Affordable housing, though prices are rising. However, plenty of land to expand.

Jerry1 06-24-2021 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by molly312 (Post 2624299)
We retired to Columbia, MO. City has wonderful parks, Katy Trail with spurs throughout the city, great health care and lots of activities. Not too crowded. University of Missouri, Stephens College, and Columbia College. We can hop on a trail and walk into town - never crossing a busy street (tunnels). Affordable housing, though prices are rising. However, plenty of land to expand.

My dad retired to Columbia about 30 years ago. He had a house there where a couple of his wife’s kids based themselves for college and then later, he renovated it and moved there. He has been very happy there.

GalaxyBoy 06-24-2021 07:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KingOfTheCheapos (Post 2624061)
I'm curious whether this getting cheaper or more expensive? In the past I'd think it would be getting more expensive but with COVID and lots of colleges moving to on-line for 2020 and many keeping some online I see prices going down?

With real estate skyrocketing in general it's hard to say. In my area Virginia Tech is rapidly expanding and there's an exceptional demand for housing in Blacksburg, not just for students but for all the other people who support the university as well as the local economy. I read that single-family housing is especially in short supply.

harllee 06-24-2021 07:49 AM

Housing prices in Chapel Hill have definitely been going up recently and will probably continue. Chapel Hill is one of the more expensive places to live in NC but still it is low cost of living compared to many places in the U.S.

audreyh1 06-24-2021 09:24 AM

Once upon a time Austin was a somewhat sleepy university town, and the Texas legislature only met every two years for 140 days so didn’t have much impact. Not small or sleepy anymore, as high tech industry dwarfs everything else and many very wealthy technologists live there now.

Montecfo 06-24-2021 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by audreyh1 (Post 2624363)
Once upon a time Austin was a somewhat sleepy university town, and the Texas legislature only met every two years for 140 days so didn’t have much impact. Not small or sleepy anymore, as high tech industry dwarfs everything else and many very wealthy technologists live there now.

Yes. People I know from there do not recognize it anymore. I would not think of it as a college town, but a large city with a huge university.

Having said that some nearby areas can be attractive, such as Georgetown.

That Austin-San Antonio corridor sure is getting busy and developed.

Out-to-Lunch 06-24-2021 09:59 AM

Regarding Austin: Yeah, it is hard to know how to categorize some cities that are both the capital AND host a large college. And some of these are large or largish cities, to boot:

(And I am sure I missed a few...)
Talahassee, FL
Austin, TX
Raleigh, NC
Madison, WI
St. Paul, MN
Columbus, OH
Phoenix, AZ
Baton Rouge, LA
Richmond, VA
Lincoln, NE
Columbia, SC
Boston, MA

Oh, @Time2's post below reminded me!:
Lansing, MI

audreyh1 06-24-2021 11:35 AM

Austin was way smaller in the 70s. And even though there was some high tech industry, it didn't really explode until the 90s, and then just kept on exploding.

harllee 06-24-2021 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by audreyh1 (Post 2624413)
Austin was way smaller in the 70s. And even though there was some high tech industry, it didn't really explode until the 90s, and then just kept on exploding.

I hope that does not happen to my town of Chapel Hill. Right now it is a small town with a large university, However, it is near Research Triangle Park and it was just announced that Apple is going to build a large office at RTP and employ thousands of people.

Starsky 06-24-2021 12:50 PM

Grew up in a smaller College town. Loved it, and a lot of people from there, have decided to stay there in retirement and are extremely happy. If you're looking for a nice area in the heart of Southern California i would take a look at Claremont. It's a sleeper.

RunningBum 06-24-2021 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GalaxyBoy (Post 2624322)
With real estate skyrocketing in general it's hard to say. In my area Virginia Tech is rapidly expanding and there's an exceptional demand for housing in Blacksburg, not just for students but for all the other people who support the university as well as the local economy. I read that single-family housing is especially in short supply.

I'm following this area closely, since my son is looking to buy in Blacksburg or Christiansburg. He got outbid on his first offer last weekend. He's not in a hurry, yet. His realtor thinks things will get less competitive at the end of summer since families want to get moved in before school starts. But that would also imply less supply. We'll see.

Time2 06-24-2021 02:24 PM

I left E. Lansing Michigan 27 years ago+ and definitely miss the campus activity of MSU and the college community.
That was 27 years ago, it has probably changed a lot.

Montecfo 06-24-2021 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Time2 (Post 2624490)
I left E. Lansing Michigan 27 years ago+ and definitely miss the campus activity of MSU and the college community.
That was 27 years ago, it has probably changed a lot.

No doubt. But anywhere I go back to that in loved there is some sense of loss at places that are gone or have changed.

My college campus swimming pool-gone

Fave college restaurants-gone

First house-torn down and replaced.

Bigger more traffic less charm.

But I still enjoy those places.

Calico 06-24-2021 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick12 (Post 2624287)
Most of Durham? Don't agree. Durham which is just a few miles from Chapel Hill still has high crime rates especially Lakewood which is adjacent to some of the expensive areas of Durham. Main street has continued to be cleaned up which is a good thing but Durham has a long way to go. When my relative went for his Duke MBA ( Fuqua ) we never ventured to Chapel Hill since like you said Duke and UNC are bitter rivals. That is so true.

I have lived in Durham for 22 years and have never experienced even the slightest brush with crime. I have numerous friends who can say the same thing, and we live in different parts of Durham.

As with any other location on earth, it depends on where you are. Is Lakewood sketchy? Yes. Are there other sketchy areas? Yes. Just like any other city on planet earth.

You are painting all of Durham with a very broad (and inaccurate) brush.

rodi 06-24-2021 07:02 PM

I lived in Bellingham, WA in my early 30's. Western Washington University was a huge influence on quality of life. My father was nearing retirement and wanted to retire there but my mom wouldn't move out of San Diego. There are a lot of advantages to living in a college town.

I'm currently fairly close to a large university (UCSD) and many of my neighbors are faculty or administration. My neighborhood's name acknowledges the closeness to the university and the street names are all nobel prize winners (though some are mispelled. lol).

One advantage to being surrounded by academics... They tend to be well educated and smart. I remember attending a baby shower with other neighborhood moms about 15 years ago... of the 10 women, 8 had doctorates. (and I was one of the 2 that only had masters level education.)

daylatedollarshort 06-24-2021 09:59 PM

Colleges also often have sports and outdoor programs open to the public. We've taken canoe and sailing lessons through local colleges and gone on rafting, canoeing and ski trips, which were all pretty modestly priced.

Nick12 06-25-2021 04:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Calico (Post 2624611)
I have lived in Durham for 22 years and have never experienced even the slightest brush with crime. I have numerous friends who can say the same thing, and we live in different parts of Durham.

As with any other location on earth, it depends on where you are. Is Lakewood sketchy? Yes. Are there other sketchy areas? Yes. Just like any other city on planet earth.

You are painting all of Durham with a very broad (and inaccurate) brush.

I am not painting a picture. I had family and friends live in Durham and some went to Duke.

harllee 06-25-2021 04:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Calico (Post 2624611)
I have lived in Durham for 22 years and have never experienced even the slightest brush with crime. I have numerous friends who can say the same thing, and we live in different parts of Durham.

As with any other location on earth, it depends on where you are. Is Lakewood sketchy? Yes. Are there other sketchy areas? Yes. Just like any other city on planet earth.

You are painting all of Durham with a very broad (and inaccurate) brush.

Totally agree. While I am a UNC sports fan, I go to Durham frequently for restaurants, culture etc. I never feel unsafe. Durham is a cool happening town.
The Durham Performing Arts Center and the Durham Bulls Stadium are top notch.

NYEXPAT 06-25-2021 08:17 AM

We love it here! Good job opportunities for the YW, great schools for the Kid's, LCOL. Good Universities, Healthcare galore and a not half bad Peruvian restaurant.

Scubamax 06-28-2021 01:29 PM

We elected a college town for all of the reasons listed. Arts, Entertainment, Culture, Good Medical Care, Restaurants and other retail, and a youthful vibe. We actually live about 30 minutes from town on a bit of land so its the best of both worlds. Just need to get used to driving to get anywhere. Somedays I miss not having things within walking distance. But then again I probably save some money being further away from spontaneous temptations.

FreeBear 06-30-2021 01:55 PM

What about a college city like Tucson?? We’ve got U of A, complete with their med school and hospital. Great food scene. Campus is urban, but certainly not New York, San Francisco, or Chicago. Good or bad depending on your tastes.

Yes, it’s hot, but at least it’s not Phoenix!

NoEZmoney 07-02-2021 03:37 PM

University-based Retirement Communities?
 
We've put university-based retirement communities on our radar as a possibility. Many schools are having on-campus enrollment shortages and are doing what they can to attract occupancy and use of their facilities.

Stephen F. Austin State University in East Texas had launched a program but it folded because of third-party management not being up to par (from what I was told). But there are quite a few other options as indicated in this link:

https://www.theseniorlist.com/retire...st/university/

Nick12 07-02-2021 03:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FreeBear (Post 2627282)
What about a college city like Tucson?? We’ve got U of A, complete with their med school and hospital. Great food scene. Campus is urban, but certainly not New York, San Francisco, or Chicago. Good or bad depending on your tastes.

Yes, it’s hot, but at least it’s not Phoenix!

There is no better hot dog than a Sonoran hot dog in AZ!

braumeister 07-02-2021 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NoEZmoney (Post 2628134)
We've put university-based retirement communities on our radar as a possibility. Many schools are having on-campus enrollment shortages and are doing what they can to attract occupancy and use of their facilities.

Uh oh. Gives new meaning to the term "senior dorm".

Radlink54 07-02-2021 03:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Out-to-Lunch (Post 2624377)
Regarding Austin: Yeah, it is hard to know how to categorize some cities that are both the capital AND host a large college. And some of these are large or largish cities, to boot:

(And I am sure I missed a few...)
Talahassee, FL
Austin, TX
Raleigh, NC
Madison, WI
St. Paul, MN
Columbus, OH
Phoenix, AZ
Baton Rouge, LA
Richmond, VA
Lincoln, NE
Columbia, SC
Boston, MA

Oh, @Time2's post below reminded me!:
Lansing, MI

Nashville: Vanderbilt/Belmont/Lipscomb/TnState etc. Sadly like Austin no longer small or quaint. Great if you like big, now diverse and prosperous.

I think of college towns like Chapel Hill, Athens GA, Bloomington IN etc as a whole different world than most of the “capital with colleges” listed above. Most of these are not “college towns” .

Montclairbobbyb 07-02-2021 03:49 PM

It's all fun and games until you end up in the middle of a riot. I love Keene, NH, and have considered living there, but things got a bit insane one Halloween (a few years ago), when masses of college students clashed with local police after too much pumpkin carving and drinking, erupting into a full-blown riot, making national headlines...leaving me wondering what was I thinking? I love college students... I was one myself, and recently my kids graduated from well-known "party" universities... but I'd rather watch Animal House and laugh than see it happening on the streets of my town.

Actually I'm not such an old fud... I'm just an intolerant one...

2lhasas 07-02-2021 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KingOfTheCheapos (Post 2624061)
I'm curious whether this getting cheaper or more expensive? In the past I'd think it would be getting more expensive but with COVID and lots of colleges moving to on-line for 2020 and many keeping some online I see prices going down?

We just bought a home in Athens, Georgia for our son to live in while he is in school. Large university in a relatively small city seems to translate into a lack of housing in general. We decided to purchase, in part because the rental market seemed out of whack, and the rent we will collect from his roommates more than covers all of the costs. We paid $20k more than what homes sold for the year prior, and 6 months later, a house down the street just sold for 32K more than we paid after 2 days on the market. College towns have not escaped the housing boom.

JDARNELL 07-02-2021 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2lhasas (Post 2628151)
We just bought a home in Athens, Georgia for our son to live in while he is in school. Large university in a relatively small city seems to translate into a lack of housing in general. We decided to purchase, in part because the rental market seemed out of whack, and the rent we will collect from his roommates more than covers all of the costs. We paid $20k more than what homes sold for the year prior, and 6 months later, a house down the street just sold for 32K more than we paid after 2 days on the market. College towns have not escaped the housing boom.



I went to school in Athens. I don’t think anyone lives there but rather visits for 4, 5, or 6 years lol

indiajust 07-02-2021 04:28 PM

I will play devils advocate.

Teaching hospitals are notoriously overpriced and error prone. My step mother does her best to avoid the overpriced training grounds and cruel prices of the pseudo-non profit academic hospitals. She taught nursing for years and saw how the sausage was made.

Further, NC is a CON state, certificate of need, for hospital competition. As a result it has an extraodinarily high cost structure, exceeded only by new england and perhaps california.

As a resident of Raleigh, I never wish anyone to suffer the ministrations of the local hospital monopoly.

The only saving grace is the legalization of Direct Primary Care. You can always travel to Oklahoma City for the lowest cost care in the US, Keith Smith and the Surgery Center of Oklahoma.

My experience contravenes academic medical practice as anything other than overpriced and underwhelming.

Chapel Hill and Carrboro is glorious place to spend federal student loans on an overpriced mix of alcohol and upper class mating rituals, disguised as education.

As the dollar wavers, and the student loan subsidy is under attack... are you sure you want to bet the farm on an endless continuation of federal reserve and lending to continue to support a one trick pony economy? This looks like Scranton PA to me in 1970 as steel is leaving the economy.

If sanity appears at Subsidy U, and demographics contract as expected, an awful lot of mediocre college towns must die.

I am already seeing mergers and bankruptcy in new england.

Be careful out there. Devils advocate position.

harllee 07-02-2021 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indiajust (Post 2628171)
I will play devils advocate.

Teaching hospitals are notoriously overpriced and error prone. My step mother does her best to avoid the overpriced training grounds and cruel prices of the pseudo-non profit academic hospitals. She taught nursing for years and saw how the sausage was made.

Further, NC is a CON state, certificate of need, for hospital competition. As a result it has an extraodinarily high cost structure, exceeded only by new england and perhaps california.

As a resident of Raleigh, I never wish anyone to suffer the ministrations of the local hospital monopoly.

The only saving grace is the legalization of Direct Primary Care. You can always travel to Oklahoma City for the lowest cost care in the US, Keith Smith and the Surgery Center of Oklahoma.

My experience contravenes academic medical practice as anything other than overpriced and underwhelming.

Chapel Hill and Carrboro is glorious place to spend federal student loans on an overpriced mix of alcohol and upper class mating rituals, disguised as education.

As the dollar wavers, and the student loan subsidy is under attack... are you sure you want to bet the farm on an endless continuation of federal reserve and lending to continue to support a one trick pony economy? This looks like Scranton PA to me in 1970 as steel is leaving the economy.

If sanity appears at Subsidy U, and demographics contract as expected, an awful lot of mediocre college towns must die.

I am already seeing mergers and bankruptcy in new england.

Be careful out there. Devils advocate position.

Thanks for the devils advocate viewpoint. I disagree with most everything you said. I and my family have all had excellent care at UNC and Duke Hospitals, I would not go anywhere else for a serious condition. I love living in Chapel Hill. I don't see any financial problems for UNC or Chapel Hill. UNC's applications go up every year and only a very small percentage are admitted. I think Chapel Hill is going to continue to be a place to live for many years in the future.

So indiajust where do you plan to retire?

harllee 07-02-2021 04:37 PM

Sorry indiajust I see that you have retired and live in NH. I have been to NH in the summer and it is a lovely state. But I would hate to live there, I could not take the snow and cold.

anothercog 07-02-2021 05:21 PM

I second this. I grew up in Northampton, MA and it has a great restaurant, art and an entertainment scene for its size. Plenty to do. Cons are the cold winters and higher priced housing than the surrounding area. I’d move back there but my California wife doesn’t do winters.

Calico 07-02-2021 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indiajust (Post 2628171)
I will play devils advocate.

Teaching hospitals are notoriously overpriced and error prone. My step mother does her best to avoid the overpriced training grounds and cruel prices of the pseudo-non profit academic hospitals. She taught nursing for years and saw how the sausage was made.

Further, NC is a CON state, certificate of need, for hospital competition. As a result it has an extraodinarily high cost structure, exceeded only by new england and perhaps california.

As a resident of Raleigh, I never wish anyone to suffer the ministrations of the local hospital monopoly. <snip>

Meanwhile, in the real world:

I have multiple family members who traveled from California to be treated at Duke Hospital, which is world class.

I have several local friends whose parents' lives were saved by Duke.

I have received care at UNC Hospitals multiple times over the last 20 years (including for cancer) and I never received anything less than top notch care.

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center is a cancer research and treatment center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It is one of only 51 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the United States.

For anyone considering retiring to North Carolina, you can count on world-class medical care if the need ever arises.

meleana 07-03-2021 04:48 AM

We thought about moving to a college town in NH where our son went to school. He still lives there. It’s a small New England town.

For one thing he told us is we wouldn’t want to live there with all the shenanigans that go on. Drunkenness, noise, etc. Lol!

Plus hard to find the right type of housing we wanted. Everything to rent or buy in the town in terms of housing was geared towards students.

Anyway, we are only 1/2 hour from there now and we occasionally go there. But with the COVID situation a lot of things in that town were shut down or had a lot of restrictions. More so than other areas because of the students.

But honestly where we live- which is a vacation area- there is plenty to see and do anyway.

indiajust 07-05-2021 07:46 AM

I've lived in 20 states and paid taxes in 10. The absence of cap gains taxes is very helpful for me in NH at the moment. But since my retirement was unplanned and incidental, I don't think I will die in NH.

I lived in several places in Durham, Cary, Raleigh, Winston and a few other towns in NC, so I learned the state fairly well. If price is no object, care at Duke and UNC is excellent, just as folks observed. The higher end of the market is well served, world class. As is the small subsidized free portion at the very bottom. It is the ever increasing gap between the two that NC health care has problems with cost and service.

I have always run hot, so the winter is not much of an impairment for me, and I enjoy snowboarding. Also, northern winters are sunnier than the fiercest day at the beach, which I prefer to carolina gloom. It is odd for the sun to rise at 9 and die at 3, but as retired human I get to see the sun instead of commute in the dark.

It is the small isolated mediocre college towns that I see suffering and contracting with their single source of funding. The students at UNC-CH are incidental to the great business in government research/contracting. Tuition is less of a factor than grants and contracts. The kids are irrelevant to the mission.

I had flat tires in Durham from needles and ammunition, saw entire neighborhoods stripped of their wheels and tires, had a bum die in the common basement of Duke sociopath founder residence converted to apartments, had cop shot in face on property. The natives refer to Duke as 'the plantation', largely due to the way NY/NJ students treat the staff. It is much improved from the 90's, but had a long way to go. I spent a year or two bribing Duke custodians so that I could directly access the internet at night as it was being formed. Good times.

The accidental use of hydraulic fluid as surgical cleaner stands out in my memory of Duke hospital, as does frequent losing of patients in rats maze of older buildings.

I do miss the wide range of food options, new england is stunted in comparison. And I miss the culture of growth and change that folks in NC subscribe to. New England leans hard toward whale oil and 1920 lifestyle. Uninsulated in NC was bad enough, up here it is more common and insanely expensive. Yet common. Sigh.

Nick12 07-05-2021 08:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indiajust (Post 2629228)
I've lived in 20 states and paid taxes in 10. The absence of cap gains taxes is very helpful for me in NH at the moment. But since my retirement was unplanned and incidental, I don't think I will die in NH.

I lived in several places in Durham, Cary, Raleigh, Winston and a few other towns in NC, so I learned the state fairly well. If price is no object, care at Duke and UNC is excellent, just as folks observed. The higher end of the market is well served, world class. As is the small subsidized free portion at the very bottom. It is the ever increasing gap between the two that NC health care has problems with cost and service.

I have always run hot, so the winter is not much of an impairment for me, and I enjoy snowboarding. Also, northern winters are sunnier than the fiercest day at the beach, which I prefer to carolina gloom. It is odd for the sun to rise at 9 and die at 3, but as retired human I get to see the sun instead of commute in the dark.

It is the small isolated mediocre college towns that I see suffering and contracting with their single source of funding. The students at UNC-CH are incidental to the great business in government research/contracting. Tuition is less of a factor than grants and contracts. The kids are irrelevant to the mission.

I had flat tires in Durham from needles and ammunition, saw entire neighborhoods stripped of their wheels and tires, had a bum die in the common basement of Duke sociopath founder residence converted to apartments, had cop shot in face on property. The natives refer to Duke as 'the plantation', largely due to the way NY/NJ students treat the staff. It is much improved from the 90's, but had a long way to go. I spent a year or two bribing Duke custodians so that I could directly access the internet at night as it was being formed. Good times.

The accidental use of hydraulic fluid as surgical cleaner stands out in my memory of Duke hospital, as does frequent losing of patients in rats maze of older buildings.

I do miss the wide range of food options, new england is stunted in comparison. And I miss the culture of growth and change that folks in NC subscribe to. New England leans hard toward whale oil and 1920 lifestyle. Uninsulated in NC was bad enough, up here it is more common and insanely expensive. Yet common. Sigh.

+1, Durham even though improving has some very dangerous neighborhoods in the city. Chapel Hill several miles away is completely different. One guy said he grew up and lived in NC and the South all his life except for his four years at Duke. I've had friends and family go to Duke. It is a school in the South with a lot of Northern influence.

Midpack 07-05-2021 08:35 AM

We live very close to a major metro area, and also very close to a college town - but not in either. So we enjoy a lower COL with all the benefits of both. You don't have to live in either to take advantage - e.g. we love having a college town nearby, but if it was isolated we wouldn't like it all. It would not surprise me if college/universities don't run into tuition crunches in the decades ahead, they may not be as bulletproof as in the past.

harllee 07-05-2021 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indiajust (Post 2629228)
I've lived in 20 states and paid taxes in 10. The absence of cap gains taxes is very helpful for me in NH at the moment. But since my retirement was unplanned and incidental, I don't think I will die in NH.

I lived in several places in Durham, Cary, Raleigh, Winston and a few other towns in NC, so I learned the state fairly well. If price is no object, care at Duke and UNC is excellent, just as folks observed. The higher end of the market is well served, world class. As is the small subsidized free portion at the very bottom. It is the ever increasing gap between the two that NC health care has problems with cost and service.

I have always run hot, so the winter is not much of an impairment for me, and I enjoy snowboarding. Also, northern winters are sunnier than the fiercest day at the beach, which I prefer to carolina gloom. It is odd for the sun to rise at 9 and die at 3, but as retired human I get to see the sun instead of commute in the dark.

It is the small isolated mediocre college towns that I see suffering and contracting with their single source of funding. The students at UNC-CH are incidental to the great business in government research/contracting. Tuition is less of a factor than grants and contracts. The kids are irrelevant to the mission.

I had flat tires in Durham from needles and ammunition, saw entire neighborhoods stripped of their wheels and tires, had a bum die in the common basement of Duke sociopath founder residence converted to apartments, had cop shot in face on property. The natives refer to Duke as 'the plantation', largely due to the way NY/NJ students treat the staff. It is much improved from the 90's, but had a long way to go. I spent a year or two bribing Duke custodians so that I could directly access the internet at night as it was being formed. Good times.

The accidental use of hydraulic fluid as surgical cleaner stands out in my memory of Duke hospital, as does frequent losing of patients in rats maze of older buildings.

I do miss the wide range of food options, new england is stunted in comparison. And I miss the culture of growth and change that folks in NC subscribe to. New England leans hard toward whale oil and 1920 lifestyle. Uninsulated in NC was bad enough, up here it is more common and insanely expensive. Yet common. Sigh.


I wonder how many years ago you had all these bad experiences in NC. I live in Chapel Hill right now, go to Durham every week or so and have never had any of the type of experiences you describe. I highly recommend both Chapel Hill and Durham to retirees. Like any place there are some areas you might want want to go to but overall the area is safe and has lots of neat things to do.

As to the cost of health care at Duke and UNC, the cost may be high if you don't have health insurance but both places take Medicare and so for retirees on Medicare there would be no extra cost for getting world class health care.

2cheap2eat 07-08-2021 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harllee (Post 2624026)
I retired to a college town and I really like it. I went to UNC-Chapel Hill and then taught a few courses there over the years and when we retired we moved to Chapel Hill about 10 years ago. We live about a block from campus and walk or bike to campus almost every day. There are so many fun and interesting things to do on campus and around town (thing are opening back up now from the Covid shut down). This week UNC is having a summer jazz festival, with free concerts every night. Last night I went to an outdoor jazz concert and it was great. Many people retire to this area so there are many events geared to seniors. There is a Medical School here and one at Duke 8 miles down the road so there is excellent medical care.

For those of you looking for a place to retire, I suggest you look at college towns.

Not to mention all the eye candy lol

BlueberryPie 07-15-2021 05:43 PM

Most(?) colleges offer close-to-free class auditing options for seniors, a friend of mine is taking music recording and production classes because he is into that. There are also continuing education and continuing-education and other fun classes. From bird-watching to wine-tasting, all at friendly prices


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