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2lhasas 07-02-2021 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KingOfTheCheapos (Post 2624061)
I'm curious whether this getting cheaper or more expensive? In the past I'd think it would be getting more expensive but with COVID and lots of colleges moving to on-line for 2020 and many keeping some online I see prices going down?

We just bought a home in Athens, Georgia for our son to live in while he is in school. Large university in a relatively small city seems to translate into a lack of housing in general. We decided to purchase, in part because the rental market seemed out of whack, and the rent we will collect from his roommates more than covers all of the costs. We paid $20k more than what homes sold for the year prior, and 6 months later, a house down the street just sold for 32K more than we paid after 2 days on the market. College towns have not escaped the housing boom.

JDARNELL 07-02-2021 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2lhasas (Post 2628151)
We just bought a home in Athens, Georgia for our son to live in while he is in school. Large university in a relatively small city seems to translate into a lack of housing in general. We decided to purchase, in part because the rental market seemed out of whack, and the rent we will collect from his roommates more than covers all of the costs. We paid $20k more than what homes sold for the year prior, and 6 months later, a house down the street just sold for 32K more than we paid after 2 days on the market. College towns have not escaped the housing boom.



I went to school in Athens. I donít think anyone lives there but rather visits for 4, 5, or 6 years lol

indiajust 07-02-2021 04:28 PM

I will play devils advocate.

Teaching hospitals are notoriously overpriced and error prone. My step mother does her best to avoid the overpriced training grounds and cruel prices of the pseudo-non profit academic hospitals. She taught nursing for years and saw how the sausage was made.

Further, NC is a CON state, certificate of need, for hospital competition. As a result it has an extraodinarily high cost structure, exceeded only by new england and perhaps california.

As a resident of Raleigh, I never wish anyone to suffer the ministrations of the local hospital monopoly.

The only saving grace is the legalization of Direct Primary Care. You can always travel to Oklahoma City for the lowest cost care in the US, Keith Smith and the Surgery Center of Oklahoma.

My experience contravenes academic medical practice as anything other than overpriced and underwhelming.

Chapel Hill and Carrboro is glorious place to spend federal student loans on an overpriced mix of alcohol and upper class mating rituals, disguised as education.

As the dollar wavers, and the student loan subsidy is under attack... are you sure you want to bet the farm on an endless continuation of federal reserve and lending to continue to support a one trick pony economy? This looks like Scranton PA to me in 1970 as steel is leaving the economy.

If sanity appears at Subsidy U, and demographics contract as expected, an awful lot of mediocre college towns must die.

I am already seeing mergers and bankruptcy in new england.

Be careful out there. Devils advocate position.

harllee 07-02-2021 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indiajust (Post 2628171)
I will play devils advocate.

Teaching hospitals are notoriously overpriced and error prone. My step mother does her best to avoid the overpriced training grounds and cruel prices of the pseudo-non profit academic hospitals. She taught nursing for years and saw how the sausage was made.

Further, NC is a CON state, certificate of need, for hospital competition. As a result it has an extraodinarily high cost structure, exceeded only by new england and perhaps california.

As a resident of Raleigh, I never wish anyone to suffer the ministrations of the local hospital monopoly.

The only saving grace is the legalization of Direct Primary Care. You can always travel to Oklahoma City for the lowest cost care in the US, Keith Smith and the Surgery Center of Oklahoma.

My experience contravenes academic medical practice as anything other than overpriced and underwhelming.

Chapel Hill and Carrboro is glorious place to spend federal student loans on an overpriced mix of alcohol and upper class mating rituals, disguised as education.

As the dollar wavers, and the student loan subsidy is under attack... are you sure you want to bet the farm on an endless continuation of federal reserve and lending to continue to support a one trick pony economy? This looks like Scranton PA to me in 1970 as steel is leaving the economy.

If sanity appears at Subsidy U, and demographics contract as expected, an awful lot of mediocre college towns must die.

I am already seeing mergers and bankruptcy in new england.

Be careful out there. Devils advocate position.

Thanks for the devils advocate viewpoint. I disagree with most everything you said. I and my family have all had excellent care at UNC and Duke Hospitals, I would not go anywhere else for a serious condition. I love living in Chapel Hill. I don't see any financial problems for UNC or Chapel Hill. UNC's applications go up every year and only a very small percentage are admitted. I think Chapel Hill is going to continue to be a place to live for many years in the future.

So indiajust where do you plan to retire?

harllee 07-02-2021 04:37 PM

Sorry indiajust I see that you have retired and live in NH. I have been to NH in the summer and it is a lovely state. But I would hate to live there, I could not take the snow and cold.

anothercog 07-02-2021 05:21 PM

I second this. I grew up in Northampton, MA and it has a great restaurant, art and an entertainment scene for its size. Plenty to do. Cons are the cold winters and higher priced housing than the surrounding area. Iíd move back there but my California wife doesnít do winters.

Calico 07-02-2021 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indiajust (Post 2628171)
I will play devils advocate.

Teaching hospitals are notoriously overpriced and error prone. My step mother does her best to avoid the overpriced training grounds and cruel prices of the pseudo-non profit academic hospitals. She taught nursing for years and saw how the sausage was made.

Further, NC is a CON state, certificate of need, for hospital competition. As a result it has an extraodinarily high cost structure, exceeded only by new england and perhaps california.

As a resident of Raleigh, I never wish anyone to suffer the ministrations of the local hospital monopoly. <snip>

Meanwhile, in the real world:

I have multiple family members who traveled from California to be treated at Duke Hospital, which is world class.

I have several local friends whose parents' lives were saved by Duke.

I have received care at UNC Hospitals multiple times over the last 20 years (including for cancer) and I never received anything less than top notch care.

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center is a cancer research and treatment center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It is one of only 51 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the United States.

For anyone considering retiring to North Carolina, you can count on world-class medical care if the need ever arises.

meleana 07-03-2021 04:48 AM

We thought about moving to a college town in NH where our son went to school. He still lives there. Itís a small New England town.

For one thing he told us is we wouldnít want to live there with all the shenanigans that go on. Drunkenness, noise, etc. Lol!

Plus hard to find the right type of housing we wanted. Everything to rent or buy in the town in terms of housing was geared towards students.

Anyway, we are only 1/2 hour from there now and we occasionally go there. But with the COVID situation a lot of things in that town were shut down or had a lot of restrictions. More so than other areas because of the students.

But honestly where we live- which is a vacation area- there is plenty to see and do anyway.

indiajust 07-05-2021 07:46 AM

I've lived in 20 states and paid taxes in 10. The absence of cap gains taxes is very helpful for me in NH at the moment. But since my retirement was unplanned and incidental, I don't think I will die in NH.

I lived in several places in Durham, Cary, Raleigh, Winston and a few other towns in NC, so I learned the state fairly well. If price is no object, care at Duke and UNC is excellent, just as folks observed. The higher end of the market is well served, world class. As is the small subsidized free portion at the very bottom. It is the ever increasing gap between the two that NC health care has problems with cost and service.

I have always run hot, so the winter is not much of an impairment for me, and I enjoy snowboarding. Also, northern winters are sunnier than the fiercest day at the beach, which I prefer to carolina gloom. It is odd for the sun to rise at 9 and die at 3, but as retired human I get to see the sun instead of commute in the dark.

It is the small isolated mediocre college towns that I see suffering and contracting with their single source of funding. The students at UNC-CH are incidental to the great business in government research/contracting. Tuition is less of a factor than grants and contracts. The kids are irrelevant to the mission.

I had flat tires in Durham from needles and ammunition, saw entire neighborhoods stripped of their wheels and tires, had a bum die in the common basement of Duke sociopath founder residence converted to apartments, had cop shot in face on property. The natives refer to Duke as 'the plantation', largely due to the way NY/NJ students treat the staff. It is much improved from the 90's, but had a long way to go. I spent a year or two bribing Duke custodians so that I could directly access the internet at night as it was being formed. Good times.

The accidental use of hydraulic fluid as surgical cleaner stands out in my memory of Duke hospital, as does frequent losing of patients in rats maze of older buildings.

I do miss the wide range of food options, new england is stunted in comparison. And I miss the culture of growth and change that folks in NC subscribe to. New England leans hard toward whale oil and 1920 lifestyle. Uninsulated in NC was bad enough, up here it is more common and insanely expensive. Yet common. Sigh.

Nick12 07-05-2021 08:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indiajust (Post 2629228)
I've lived in 20 states and paid taxes in 10. The absence of cap gains taxes is very helpful for me in NH at the moment. But since my retirement was unplanned and incidental, I don't think I will die in NH.

I lived in several places in Durham, Cary, Raleigh, Winston and a few other towns in NC, so I learned the state fairly well. If price is no object, care at Duke and UNC is excellent, just as folks observed. The higher end of the market is well served, world class. As is the small subsidized free portion at the very bottom. It is the ever increasing gap between the two that NC health care has problems with cost and service.

I have always run hot, so the winter is not much of an impairment for me, and I enjoy snowboarding. Also, northern winters are sunnier than the fiercest day at the beach, which I prefer to carolina gloom. It is odd for the sun to rise at 9 and die at 3, but as retired human I get to see the sun instead of commute in the dark.

It is the small isolated mediocre college towns that I see suffering and contracting with their single source of funding. The students at UNC-CH are incidental to the great business in government research/contracting. Tuition is less of a factor than grants and contracts. The kids are irrelevant to the mission.

I had flat tires in Durham from needles and ammunition, saw entire neighborhoods stripped of their wheels and tires, had a bum die in the common basement of Duke sociopath founder residence converted to apartments, had cop shot in face on property. The natives refer to Duke as 'the plantation', largely due to the way NY/NJ students treat the staff. It is much improved from the 90's, but had a long way to go. I spent a year or two bribing Duke custodians so that I could directly access the internet at night as it was being formed. Good times.

The accidental use of hydraulic fluid as surgical cleaner stands out in my memory of Duke hospital, as does frequent losing of patients in rats maze of older buildings.

I do miss the wide range of food options, new england is stunted in comparison. And I miss the culture of growth and change that folks in NC subscribe to. New England leans hard toward whale oil and 1920 lifestyle. Uninsulated in NC was bad enough, up here it is more common and insanely expensive. Yet common. Sigh.

+1, Durham even though improving has some very dangerous neighborhoods in the city. Chapel Hill several miles away is completely different. One guy said he grew up and lived in NC and the South all his life except for his four years at Duke. I've had friends and family go to Duke. It is a school in the South with a lot of Northern influence.

Midpack 07-05-2021 08:35 AM

We live very close to a major metro area, and also very close to a college town - but not in either. So we enjoy a lower COL with all the benefits of both. You don't have to live in either to take advantage - e.g. we love having a college town nearby, but if it was isolated we wouldn't like it all. It would not surprise me if college/universities don't run into tuition crunches in the decades ahead, they may not be as bulletproof as in the past.

harllee 07-05-2021 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indiajust (Post 2629228)
I've lived in 20 states and paid taxes in 10. The absence of cap gains taxes is very helpful for me in NH at the moment. But since my retirement was unplanned and incidental, I don't think I will die in NH.

I lived in several places in Durham, Cary, Raleigh, Winston and a few other towns in NC, so I learned the state fairly well. If price is no object, care at Duke and UNC is excellent, just as folks observed. The higher end of the market is well served, world class. As is the small subsidized free portion at the very bottom. It is the ever increasing gap between the two that NC health care has problems with cost and service.

I have always run hot, so the winter is not much of an impairment for me, and I enjoy snowboarding. Also, northern winters are sunnier than the fiercest day at the beach, which I prefer to carolina gloom. It is odd for the sun to rise at 9 and die at 3, but as retired human I get to see the sun instead of commute in the dark.

It is the small isolated mediocre college towns that I see suffering and contracting with their single source of funding. The students at UNC-CH are incidental to the great business in government research/contracting. Tuition is less of a factor than grants and contracts. The kids are irrelevant to the mission.

I had flat tires in Durham from needles and ammunition, saw entire neighborhoods stripped of their wheels and tires, had a bum die in the common basement of Duke sociopath founder residence converted to apartments, had cop shot in face on property. The natives refer to Duke as 'the plantation', largely due to the way NY/NJ students treat the staff. It is much improved from the 90's, but had a long way to go. I spent a year or two bribing Duke custodians so that I could directly access the internet at night as it was being formed. Good times.

The accidental use of hydraulic fluid as surgical cleaner stands out in my memory of Duke hospital, as does frequent losing of patients in rats maze of older buildings.

I do miss the wide range of food options, new england is stunted in comparison. And I miss the culture of growth and change that folks in NC subscribe to. New England leans hard toward whale oil and 1920 lifestyle. Uninsulated in NC was bad enough, up here it is more common and insanely expensive. Yet common. Sigh.


I wonder how many years ago you had all these bad experiences in NC. I live in Chapel Hill right now, go to Durham every week or so and have never had any of the type of experiences you describe. I highly recommend both Chapel Hill and Durham to retirees. Like any place there are some areas you might want want to go to but overall the area is safe and has lots of neat things to do.

As to the cost of health care at Duke and UNC, the cost may be high if you don't have health insurance but both places take Medicare and so for retirees on Medicare there would be no extra cost for getting world class health care.

2cheap2eat 07-08-2021 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harllee (Post 2624026)
I retired to a college town and I really like it. I went to UNC-Chapel Hill and then taught a few courses there over the years and when we retired we moved to Chapel Hill about 10 years ago. We live about a block from campus and walk or bike to campus almost every day. There are so many fun and interesting things to do on campus and around town (thing are opening back up now from the Covid shut down). This week UNC is having a summer jazz festival, with free concerts every night. Last night I went to an outdoor jazz concert and it was great. Many people retire to this area so there are many events geared to seniors. There is a Medical School here and one at Duke 8 miles down the road so there is excellent medical care.

For those of you looking for a place to retire, I suggest you look at college towns.

Not to mention all the eye candy lol

BlueberryPie 07-15-2021 05:43 PM

Most(?) colleges offer close-to-free class auditing options for seniors, a friend of mine is taking music recording and production classes because he is into that. There are also continuing education and continuing-education and other fun classes. From bird-watching to wine-tasting, all at friendly prices


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