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Old Admin 06-26-2002 04:21 PM

The Retire Early Home Page
 
The "mother lode" of early retirement information is at the Retire Early Home Page.

How many already-ER's out there, besides myself, achieved early retirement because of Intercst's super website?

arrete 10-10-2002 04:17 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Intercst's REHP was definitely instramental in pushing me into retirement. I had read "Your Money or Your Life", and found the concept of figuring out what you really were earning a frightening idea. So I did the budget thing - for years, whether I was spending in dollars or krona.

Then I found "Cashing in on the American Dream" by Paul Terhorst. It was starting to seem possible, but both these books had very conservative investment advice. If I had taken it (1) I never would have gotten a big enough nest egg and (2) my husband would have had me locked up. He comes from a long line of equity investors.

In desperation, I searched the internet on the phrase retire early - and this was waaay before Google. The only thing that came up was intercst's page. I could play with numbers! Equities were OK - fine, even. Lots of studies and statistics and spreadsheets (I love Excel). My only idiocy was I kept looking at 4% of my after tax accounts. Definitely not enough. My husband finally told me to add in my retirement accounts and see if I could make it on less than 5% (pretty close to intercst's number and he was tired of my whining) - I could make it on 3%! Sold! - I was retired within 2 months.

So, intercst may have not been the initial impetus, but he sure was the catlyst that pushed me into retirement.

And it is a rainy Thursday - and I get to stay home, away from traffic accidents.

So, thanks, intercst. And thanks Dory for providing a place to babble.

arrete

dory36 10-13-2002 04:55 PM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Thanks for the bio, Arrette.

I discovered the REHP (which led me to my own early retirement) completely by accident.

I had many of the same bad assumptions that others have reported, and was expecting to work for years longer.

A co-worker celebrated his 50th birthday, and the folks at the office papered his office door with "getting old" stuff -- AARP membership forms, webpage printouts on elder care, and so forth. One co-worker taped up a printout of the REHP she had discovered in a search merely for this purpose.

I saw that, and looked at the site out of curiosity. *As a result, I retired YEARS before I would have otherwise! Had I not seen that piece of paper. posted on a door as a gag, I'd still be there slogging it out every day...

Dory36

MRGALT2U 01-05-2003 11:57 PM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Hello my friends! I was already thinking about how
to exit early when I read Paul Terhorst's book. So,
he didn't give me the idea but he surely gave me a push.
I found the REHP much later. All good stuff! It's interesting to think how many people could do this but
don't. Of course, as everyone reading this knows, it takes a lot of planning/work. I never did anything that yielded better overall results, or that
was timed better in terms of where I was in my life.
It was right for me. Just wish I had seen that a few years
earlier.

ShokWaveRider 06-25-2003 08:52 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
What really helped me to retire early was the "Millionaire Next Door" In Fact I could have wrote it. I have always been like that since I was 25 with one exception. Life is to be enjoyed and as with all of these types of books, They are extremes. I do like a nice car, (my only vise) and I do not buy sub standard items just because they are cheap. I save for the good ones, and simply am not an impulse buyer (That alone will save you a million over a life time if not more).

My favorite line in the whole book is "I am my own charity". Do you folks have any favorites you would like to share?

Ian

MRGALT2U 06-25-2003 12:44 PM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
I have not read the book. However, "I am my own charity" is pretty good.

I have a couple of rules that I live by, but one that applies to REs is "If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail."

BigMoneyJim 07-13-2003 07:01 PM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Quote:

What really helped me to retire early was the "Millionaire Next Door" In Fact I could have wrote it. I have always been like that since I was 25 with one exception. Life is to be enjoyed and as with all of these types of books, They are extremes. I do like a nice car, (my only vise) and I do not buy sub standard items just because they are cheap. I save for the good ones, and simply am not an impulse buyer (That alone will save you a million over a life time if not more).
I started thinking about early retirement after finding the REHP message board on The Motley Fool (now subscription-based, so I'm here now) and then reading Intercst's REHP site. It was part of a financial self-education I started while out of work about 3 years ago. I read The Millionaire Next Door and found it intriguing, too.

I agree with you about extremes. Somewhere along the way I read an example similar to this: You can buy generic cola and ultra cheap beer, but if you insist on Coca-Cola and Heineken just include that in your plans.

BUM 02-16-2005 04:37 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
I've been "on board" for about a year. Lurking a bit longer. Back in 2003 I was faced with the decision to reinvest in my business or let it wind down. Reinvestment would have been a 5 year committment. After running Firecalc and reading the posts, I concluded 5 minutes was too long to stay locked inside my hamster wheel!

THANKS to everyone connected with this great endeavor.

BUM

Eagle43 02-16-2005 05:53 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
I didn't retire early, but I got here as soon as I could. Now the goal is to outlive the bastards. :) ;D

JOhn Galt 02-16-2005 06:04 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Hello Eagle..............

Non Illegitimi Carborundum

JG

Eagle43 02-16-2005 06:10 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Bum,
I love the hamster wheel reference. T'is appropriate. :) I used to envision a giant anthill, with each of us employees running to and fro, carrying our mound of earth. Not really a good metaphor, though, because the anthill has a purpose.

BUM 03-04-2005 02:52 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Quote:

Bum,
I love the hamster wheel reference. T'is appropriate. :) I used to envision a giant anthill, with each of us employees running to and fro, carrying our mound of earth. Not really a good metaphor, though, because the anthill has a purpose.

Eagle43,

I used to have a cute little GIF file of that mythological whatisname who was doomed to push a huge boulder up a hill. When he got it to the top it would roll down and the process would start anew.

Thankfully the job I ERed from was not like that. But from the many posts here one can see the toll, (depression) that repetition or on another thread "sameness", can take on ones spirit.
This negative experience takes huge bites out of lives. I dont know how to respond to those who lament "Yeah, but I only have ten more YEARS to go."

BUM

JOhn Galt 03-04-2005 02:58 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Hi BUM. I'm with you. I don't know how to respond either. Pity I guess. It's so sad that even I just keep my mouth shut. A most rare event when I hold a
strong opinion :)

JG

Helen 04-16-2005 04:56 PM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Quote:

Hi BUM. *I'm with you. *I don't know how to respond either. *Pity I guess. *It's so sad that even I just keep my mouth shut. *A most rare event when I hold a
strong opinion * :)

JG
Well you don't need to respond, but that is pretty much me. I have 8 years to go. I don't hate my job but I would much rather be retired. I also can't think of another field that I would rather do over computers, it's just that I am tired of the routine and would much rather have control over my time.

My job allows me to park a lot of money away annually. I will be able to pay my mortgage off this year. I get a month vacation per year and in 3 years I will go up to 5 weeks vacation. In eight years I will be able to retire at age 56 with a reduced Gov't pension, health bennies for life and about a $20k+ per year travel budget. Weeeeee !!!

I think it would be stupid for me to bail out now as I would have to work somewhere and it would mean I would have to work longer than 8 years. The sad truth is that I can not retire until I have enough money socked away to live on - and I'm not there yet.

All I have to do to RE is keep doing what I'm doing now and try to maximize the enjoyment I get out of life. It's not that bad, it will just be better I think once I leave my worklife behind.

-helen

MRGALT2U 04-16-2005 05:09 PM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Hello Helen. These are very difficult decisions for most
people. I am a kind of freak in that I just up and quit,
figuring I would work out the details later. I have learned almost no one else does it that way, nor should they. However, one thing that has helped me over the years is:
"Most of the things we worry about never happen."
That has certainly been true in my case.

Good luck.

JG

Helen 04-16-2005 11:01 PM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Quote:

Helen
IF you think it would be stupid to bail - then it probably would be... There is alot to be said for delayed gratification... With any luck maybe a site closure or downsizing initiative will lead to an early out offer for you...

Stay the course -- semi-retirement = semi-working -- and that sounds entirely too disfunctional.
GD-ER,

Yes, an early out would be nice, but doubtful. I think the demographics are such that they will probably start offering retention bonus' about the time I get ready to pull the plug.

It's not just the money, but as we all know, the health bennies are a biggie. I had a brain aneurysm that I had to deal with a few years ago which gives me a pre-existing condition. I doubt anyone would offer me a solo plan.

I had always been healthy before the aneurysm and had no symptoms. I went in for a MRI for a hearing loss and there she was - yikes ! Totally unrelated to the hearing loss.

Anyway I opted to have an endovascular coiling; they went in through an artery in my leg and snaked up to my brain and put a platinum coil inside the aneurysm. One stitch and 24 hours in ICU for observation and that was it !!!! But wow, the bills that Blue Cross picked up - Yikes again !!!!

So, I'm stuck for now at the daily grind, but the end is in sight. And, it is really fun to have a goal and to see that I am on track to meet the goal.

Bye for now,

-helen

MRGALT2U 04-17-2005 01:32 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Hello Helen. Just a quick observation. I have a whole "laundry list" of health problems. Most
showed up after retirement. This (fear of inevitable
health decline) was a major reason I quit working.
Irony for sure.

JG

Helen 04-17-2005 07:47 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Quote:

Hello Helen. *Just a quick observation. *I have a whole "laundry list" of health problems. *Most
showed up after retirement. *This (fear of inevitable
health decline) was a major reason I quit working.
Irony for sure.

JG
Yes, I feel the irony too. The brain aneurysm woke me up to the fact that I may not make it to age 96 like my Father. However, I can't pull the plug until the variables are within striking range.

Glad everything is working out for you !

-helen

razztazz 04-17-2005 09:20 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Quote:

on Today at 5:32am, MRGALT2U wrote:Hello Helen. Just a quick observation. I have a whole "laundry list" of health problems. Most
showed up after retirement. This (fear of inevitable
health decline) was a major reason I quit working.
Irony for sure.

________________
Yes, I feel the irony too. The brain aneurysm woke me up to the fact that I may not make it to age 96 like my Father. However, I can't pull the plug until the variables are within striking range.

Glad everything is working out for you !

-helen
I'm in basically the same boat. I retired at 38 and worried only abourt living to 100. Almost emideatley my health started going downhill BUT in my case the additional irony was that going to the doctor and following the protocol for "high cholesterol" (there is some early onset heart disease in the family so I figured it was worth treating) caused most of my problems. Non-reversable adverse drug reactions.

Now I have to consider that I will not live very long but still cannot follow a policy of spending like there's no tomorrow because I just don't KNOW how many tomorrow's I have. Maybe I will live to 90 after all.

It's always something! Well, at least I don't have to go to work every day.

Helen 04-17-2005 09:43 AM

Re: The Retire Early Home Page
 
Quote:


I'm in basically the same boat. *I retired at 38 and worried only abourt living to 100. Almost emideatley my health started going downhill BUT in my case the additional irony was that going to the doctor and following the protocol for "high cholesterol" (there is some early onset heart disease in the family so I figured it was worth treating) *caused most of my problems. Non-reversable adverse drug reactions.
to work every day.
Razz,

Man, that sucks big time. You were trying to do the right thing and take care of yourself.

I am really interested in hearing more if you don't mind. I found out six months ago that my total cholesterol is around 293, but my good cholesterol is really high so my ratios are good. My doctor doesn't agree that the ratios make the numbers OK and wants me to go on a high cholesterol drug.

Do you mind sharing what drugs you were on and what impact it has had ?

Thank you !

-helen


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