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-   -   The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37 (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f26/the-blog-of-a-man-who-plans-to-retire-at-37-a-15131.html)

Jack_Key 12-30-2004 04:52 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Quote:

The key is freedom - doing what you want when you want...if you want to work, great. If you don't, great. It's not sitting around doing nothing, it's having the choice/freedom to work however much you want!
That's exactly what it is. Actually, I think then that "Financial Independance" is more closely related to what you say than "Early retirement".

Jack

chris2008 11-14-2005 10:47 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Your blog is blocked - are you gone?

TromboneAl 11-16-2005 11:49 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
It will be interesting to find out what happened.

retire@40 11-16-2005 01:26 PM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
One possibility:

Maybe he finally realized his plan wasn't realistic.

Instead of adjusting his numbers, he just gave up.

TromboneAl 11-16-2005 03:21 PM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Maybe he couldn't afford to maintain the blog. :)

poyet 11-19-2005 10:42 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Or by halving his expenditures to 7k$ / year he discovered he could retire asap
Patrice!

wstu32 12-13-2005 07:42 PM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
i like that... they didnt know they were poor until the govt told them...
one thing i always had a rpoblem with...how can someone be considered poor when they own tv, car, are overweight, eat 2-3 meals per day...and have cable on top of that!

old woman 12-30-2005 11:58 PM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by wstu32
i like that... they didnt know they were poor until the govt told them...
one thing i always had a rpoblem* with...how can someone be considered poor when they own tv, car, are overweight, eat 2-3 meals per day...and have cable on top of that!

Being overweight can be cheaper than being fit, carbs are cheaper then veggies. Poor is not having everything you want or at least the idea you might get it someday.
I considered very very early retirement and decided not to do it. I had a little house, near a bus line and was paying off the house fast and puting money away for retirement. I calculated what it would take to give up working. If I had not going back to school, bought a bigger house I could be retired years ago. But I couldn't have afforded to leave the house except to get groceries, it wasn't worth it to me.
I am about at that point again, big house about paid for about enough money put away but I would be living with no choices in my life. So I will work longer, I don't mind working as much as I mind staying home with nothing to do. When I have a reason I will retire. The reason could be my health, my boyfriend's retirement, needing to care for my mom, losing my job. I just save as fast as I can and when I retire I figure out how to live on what I have.

wstu32 01-10-2006 07:59 PM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
sometimes it is not actually retirement we all strive for, it is the fact that knowing we can tell our superiors to shove it anytime we want...
that makes going/being at work a lot better!! ;)

poyet 01-11-2006 02:58 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
wstu32, you're right but I can add that once you can do it, you do it, and once you've done it, you dont stay at work for long, they dont like you any longer !
:laugh:

Jay_Gatsby 01-11-2006 07:57 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by wstu32
sometimes it is not actually retirement we all strive for, it is the fact that knowing we can tell our superiors to shove it anytime we want...
that makes going/being at work a lot better!! ;)

Fear is what keeps many people in crappy jobs. The financial independence to say "take this job and shove it, I ain't workin' here no more!" would give many people the courage to go do something they want to do, and for more than just the paycheck. With such a promise of occupational happiness, it makes me wonder why so many people don't pursue financial independence. Perhaps they haven't reached the point of being sick and tired of being sick and tired...

HFWR 01-11-2006 08:03 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
I think most folks either think it's undoable, or just can't dream the dream...

Nords 01-11-2006 09:12 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Have Funds, Will Retire
I think most folks either think it's undoable, or just can't dream the dream...

It's not a lack of courage or imagination. It's an overwhelmingly vicious downward spiral.

You're overworked, you're exhausted, you're not thinking clearly, and you're not happy. But how do you step back, take a deep breath, and rationally analyze the situation to identify the alternatives? You're up to your cheeks in swampwater and too busy swatting alligators to wonder what that giant sucking sound is.

I think the resolution only happens when there's a significant life experience-- an unexpected buyout or mass layoff, a health crisis or even death (yours or family), or a major family problem (aging parents, kid delinquency). Suddenly it's too crazy to continue the "normal" routine-- life's priorities realign themselves, you get a different routine with perhaps some reflection time, and maybe you even catch up on sleep a little. Maybe you're spending too much time in waiting rooms (or emergency rooms) with plenty to think about. However it happens, you have more time to analyze the situation and the way becomes a little clearer. Perhaps at that point there are so many more significant problems that money isn't the issue it was allowed to be.

I spent 10 fairly unhappy years on active duty waiting for my Navy pension to vest. We consoled ourselves that it helped keep the family where we wanted to be and gave us the opportunity to save more. Those thoughts were largely correct but the safety margin was razor-thin. We were surrounded by the answers-- Reservists were all around us-- but we were too busy being overworked & exhausted to think of taking the time to explore the opportunities. Our solution was adequate but it was truly the best we were capable of coming up with at the time. If I had left active duty and joined the Reserves my income would have slowed down a little and we would probably have ended up relocating, but spouse might have had a much better (more flexible) career and my retirement would only have been delayed by a few years. The drop in our stress would have more than made up for the drop in income.

When our family crisis hit, I was much closer to retirement and I'd already worked through the process of assets, expenses, & options. We knew spouse might want to leave active duty and we had the time to learn more about the Reserves. Once we'd researched the answers, spouse knew what she had to do-- and I recognized what an opportunity I'd missed.

Don't get me wrong-- I'm quite satisfied with the way things turned out. But if we'd had that unexpected crisis a few years earlier, we wouldn't have been in a very good position to figure out the answers.

wstu32 01-11-2006 05:04 PM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
right now i am couple houndred thousand short... that would cover medical insurance. i could save that in about 1 - 1 1/2 years.
i could ask my wife to pick up a few more hours at her pt job at macy's and get medical, but want that safty net ... i figure personal medical insurance to be 10k per year.
me: 40
i have 1.2 million -- just about $1 million brokerage acct, the rest in iras... townhouse free and clear. Pretty darn close...
but medical insurance is the thing holding me back at this point.
Every day i get closer and closer...
I consider myself truely blessed, but have worked for every penny!

poyet 01-13-2006 02:19 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Well, my modest experience from what I saw (parents and close persons) is that the chances of getting cured of a severe illness, say a cancer by medicare (meaning good medical system available to developed countries) are much lower than the chances of "self-engineering" one by being stressed at work or stressed in general, fighting with contracts, bosses, people, family, etc.

Hell everyday for medicare (and then you need it and it does little to rescue you) or happiness right now for a decent and reasonable life with good sleep, no smoking (whatever), no drinking, no stress... ?

Everything can happen to me, I can be dead tomorrow of a hart attack (happened to a friend of mine last year - 46yrs 4 kids), why should I worry about medicare (which I wont have for at least 10 years...) I should worry about living my life ! not you ?

I'm not telling you go ahead without having made clear choices. But medicare is an invention designed to put us in slavery as well, as work wages are. Big Brother (BB) knows that and speculate on fears of people to enslave them with security (case of civil servants doing stupid jobs but have security to die at their jobs), claiming that you need a "Carte Vitale" - vital card - to get medicare ! come on I need no card to be alive !, insurance of the insurance in case you would not be entirely covered, etc...

Fear and greed. I'm greedy to live everyday as a free man, ignoring BB as much as I can. Well, I stop my rambling (still the best dump of my real thoughts !)

dex 01-13-2006 08:54 PM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nords

I think the resolution only happens when there's a significant life experience-- an unexpected buyout or mass layoff, a health crisis or even death (yours or family), or a major family problem (aging parents, kid delinquency). Suddenly it's too crazy to continue the "normal" routine-- life's priorities realign themselves, you get a different routine with perhaps some reflection time, and maybe you even catch up on sleep a little. Maybe you're spending too much time in waiting rooms (or emergency rooms) with plenty to think about. However it happens, you have more time to analyze the situation and the way becomes a little clearer. Perhaps at that point there are so many more significant problems that money isn't the issue it was allowed to be.
.

This is an excellent point. (Note 3rd glass of wine). It is a little like the frog and the pan anology. (For those who do not know it: Put a frog into a pan of water and put on the heat. The frog will stay there and eventually be cooked. Have a pan of hot water and put a frog into it and it will jump out i.e. live.)

In some way it is more challenging/harder to leave a job where you don't have any negative issues and life is easy. I will use myself as an example - I make $150K/year without any pressure or overtime - TV in my office and 13 people that report to me to do the work. I could do this job until I was 90 without any problem. I have enough money to retire now. I'm planning on May of this year. And yet I feel the urge/need to put my resume together, contact a head hunter and see what I can get in the marketplace.

There are many individual issues to consider in the decision. I would guess that one issue is that we all share is the belief that we will not be dying/physical issues any time soon so we put off the decision. Also, we do not notice our physical and mental heath changing.

Another way of thinking about is from the point of war. Do those who join the armed forces during times of war think they will be the person to be killed and never enjoy life again? I don't think so; it will alway be the other guy. This is human nature. That is why it is the young who do it. It is those who are older and know what is to be lost by death or injury. Never again to enjoy the bliss of life or to have your options limited by injury.

The decision on RE is swimming against the stream of the mass of humanity and your past!

wstu32 01-14-2006 03:57 AM

Re: The Blog of a Man Who Plans to Retire at 37
 
nice post...even on your 3rd glass of wine. :D


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