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-   -   Ideas for healthier eats (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f38/ideas-for-healthier-eats-29382.html)

figner 08-09-2007 12:36 AM

Ideas for healthier eats
 
Along the lines of the whole wheat pasta thread - got any tips to share?

I like yogurt with different kinds of fruit mixed in, so I used to buy the single serving sizes from the grocery. Took me awhile, but recently I realized it's both healthier and cheaper to buy a big tub of plain yogurt and mix in frozen fruit. Less sugar and additives, and I get to pick exactly the kinds of fruit and yogurt I like. For work lunches, I mix it in a small tupperware in the morning and the fruit is thawed by lunchtime.

brookiel 08-09-2007 06:28 AM

Yoghurt is great, just make sure it's natural.

I generally go for foods with no colours, flavours or preservatives, and everything is wholemeal or wholewheat!

Also low carb is still the fad https://paydotcom.com/r/202/freviews/1517384/

Fireup2020 08-09-2007 06:33 AM

Craked wheat (bulgur) or wild rice are much better than any other rice (unless sushi!)

Cook multiple meals at one time, pack in lunch containers, toss in freezer, grab-n-go out the door :) I put a chicken thigh on a bed of wheat and sprinkle some veggies on top, freeze and voila - yummy lunch!

Do you have La Yogurt (plain) where you live? No extra stuff (gelatin, etc) added like the regular groc. store stuff. Mmmm!

Sarah in SC 08-09-2007 07:58 AM

I just read the Omnivore's Dilemma from the Library, and boy, it has certainly changed the way I think about food! I am going to be purchasing some local grass-fed (pastured) pork, chicken and beef this month after learning more than I probably wanted to know about the food supply!

I hope to focus on eating more locally produced (not necessarily organic) vegetables and fruits as well. I was surprised to learn of the impact of corn on nearly everything we in America eat.

But I figure, since we only eat about 1200-1500 calories a day--why shouldn't I try to put the best stuff in there possible, healthwise?

I like barley and Quinoa for whole grains--very tasty alternatives to rice!
I need to do that with the yogurt instead of buying the vanilla flavored--just add vanilla to the plain stuff (I already add fresh fruit).
Sarah

Khan 08-09-2007 10:22 AM

I like the Dannon plain whole-milk yogurt.

In the summer I make a lot of salads.

I roast or broil a hunk of protein (bird mammal fish) or use canned;

Eat some while hot.

After cooling the rest, chop it up into small pieces (inch to half inch) and put a serving size in a lidded container with large amounts of chopped raw vegetables and baby greens.

I also like small amounts of olives or chopped pickle.

Will also throw in small amounts of crumbly/shredded cheese, chopped cooked potato, pasta or rice.

Add some vinegar oil herbs spices (I raise my own herbs); put on lid and shake.

A squirt of mustard is nice with beef.

Put into fridge.

Eat at meal time.

It's always different (right now the garden is producing many peppers).

I've been experimenting with different oils and vinegars.

lazygood4nothinbum 08-09-2007 03:20 PM

my idea of healthier eats is to try to eat only what my body neither immediately rejects nor produces long term ill-effects. so, for instance, i avoid foods that give me heart burn or clog my arteries, even if they taste good and even if there is a pill to alleviate, or more likely, simply disguise symptoms. i also figure that foods with ingredients difficult to pronounce are also foods difficult to process so i try to avoid them too.

figner 08-09-2007 04:18 PM

As far as yogurts go, I like Trader Joes brand, the kind made from cows without rBST (well, it doesn't actually consist of cows, but I dunno how else to say it...). Greek yogurt too. And yup, whole grains, few additives are things I look for on ingredient labels. I think my habits are mostly healthy except for fairly frequent splurges on chocolate and ice cream, *sigh*. At least it's high quality chocolate.

bright eyed 08-09-2007 07:23 PM

i've started to integrate the quinoa - i mix it with rice

for the kids we do whole milk, organic yogurt - plain, add frozen organic fruit, honey, spinach or kale and blend! best smoothies ever and lower sugar than store bought fruit yogurt.

regular, favorite healthy meal is grilled wild salmon, rice/quinoa and broccolini (longer variety, avail at tj's)...sauteed w/ olive oil and garlic kids like it too!

steel cut oatmeal w/ milk, honey and flax seed oil...add an egg for the kiddo's and it's like souffle

this is all to balance the pizza and other quick foods we eat the rest of the week!

cute fuzzy bunny 08-09-2007 07:47 PM

Brown Cow whole milk yogurt. Often found in the refrigerated section of the "health food" aisle in supermarkets.

Always wins the taste tests. Gabe devours a whole container over 4-5 days.

I think theres some healthy recipes in the ER Forum Cookbook...?

Khan 08-09-2007 08:02 PM

Quote:

Brown Cow whole milk yogurt.
Brown Cow is good, but I'm used to the Dannon taste/texture. (I use it as a dip for fresh fruit).

Celany 08-13-2007 11:44 AM

smoothies. I do smoothies a lot, sometimes I do them for dinner with only a light salad, & small piece of meat. they can be really filling, and very healthful.

I use rice milk in my smoothies, fresh or frozen berries & fruits, nuts, flax seeds, chia seeds, raw honey, & maca. anyone that wants to simply that can just do the 1st 3 ingredients, thought I strongly recommend adding the flax seeds for added health benefits. helpful tip: buy a little coffee bean grinder to grind up nuts (I use almonds the most) & flax seeds. it makes for a smoother smootie.

not to knock the yogurt-lovers, but any ladies out there that have some 'personal female issues' on a regular basis (if you have them, you probably know what I mean), daily yogurt consumption can cause that. I used to eat yogurt every day, but when I stopped a number of health problems cleared up. oh, yogurt & all other dairy, would be a more exact way of putting it. I still use dairy, but as sparingly as possible. I've noticed a huge difference.

bright eyed 08-13-2007 12:41 PM

the "green" smoothies have helped ensure fresh greens get in the little kids diet eaily...you can't taste it at all...we use spinach and kale mostly but have heard of people using romaine etc...i used leftover spring greens too and had no taste.

i've seen suggestion for 40/60 percentage mix - 40 being the greens...but you can tilt the percentage as you get used to it.

blueberries help cover the taste and color well - in case the kiddos are scared of greenish juice.

i also just got the bamix hand blender which is worlds better than the cheapy one i had before (and died as a consequence of daily use)...it even crushes ice! woo hoo...and can use in the pot for soups etc...

unclemick 08-13-2007 06:14 PM

Crap - bad to the bone New Orleans diet or Kansas City BBQ - whole wheat bread/water for a few few days until the guilt wears off and then more of what I like.

The weird healthy stuff gives me the runs!

heh heh heh - probably die young! :rolleyes:;D

Fireup2020 08-14-2007 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Celany (Post 546402)

not to knock the yogurt-lovers, but any ladies out there that have some 'personal female issues' on a regular basis (if you have them, you probably know what I mean), daily yogurt consumption can cause that. I used to eat yogurt every day, but when I stopped a number of health problems cleared up. oh, yogurt & all other dairy, would be a more exact way of putting it. I still use dairy, but as sparingly as possible. I've noticed a huge difference.

Hmmmm....I have read and been advised that yogurt consumption is GOOD for preventing the "issues" you mentioned in addition to digestive issues. I guess it depends on the person's chemistry. All is well here :rolleyes:

windsurf 08-15-2007 06:50 AM

Check out arthurdevany.com. Go the the categories listing on the right and click on "meals."
Best common sense advice: shop mostly on the perimeter of the supermarket b/c that's where the whole foods are found. Fruits, vegetables, meat and dairy. All of the processed crap is in the middle.

Eyerishgold 08-27-2007 05:59 PM

Try mixing salsa and tuna in a bowl and spooning it onto a piece of toasted whole wheat bread.

IT'S DELICIOUS!

Dawg52 08-29-2007 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eyerishgold (Post 550589)
Try mixing salsa and tuna in a bowl and spooning it onto a piece of toasted whole wheat bread.

IT'S DELICIOUS!

Hmmmmm.......I'm gonna assume you are female and pregnant. :eek:

I'm gonna give myself a big pat on the back. Just back from the store on a health kick run. Bought bananas, apples, grapes and all natural Dannon yogurt. Oh yes, fat free milk. Did all that before I saw this thread. :)

For lunch today I had grilled chicken, green beans and mac & cheese. Tonight, a smoothie like drink using slim fast powder mix, milk, banana, and several cubes of ice mixed in the old blender. Tomorrow, not so good as I will tailgating at a football game. Plenty of fried chicken, hamburgers and all the sides washed down with a cold one. Oh well, can't be good all the time. :p

TromboneAl 08-29-2007 04:01 PM

1 Attachment(s)
This yogurt recipe from The Tightwad Gazette has worked first time, every time for me. Nice firm yogurt. For starter, just use any yogurt that says "Live active cultures." Freeze some of the yogurt you make in ice cube trays to use for starter in the future.

Start where it says "The FZ Preferred Method."

By recording the heat up and cool down time, you don't need to sit there and watch the temperature.

Martha 08-29-2007 04:23 PM

Looks like someone forgot to defrost first. :)

Al, this was close to the way we made yogurt when growing up. However, we did not add powdered milk. The powdered milk probably just gives a thicker yogurt. I was told the only reason to heat the milk to below boiling was to kill bacteria--I am not sure that is relevant anymore and it seems like you would be fine just starting with warm milk.

We kept a yogurt culture going for years.

twaddle 08-29-2007 04:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martha (Post 551300)
I was told the only reason to heat the milk to below boiling was to kill bacteria

I thought the only healthful thing about yogurt was the bacteria. I'd be interested in hearing why people think the various foods they mention are good for you. There seems to be such a tenuous connection between health and diet, at least in terms of hard science.


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