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-   -   What's your exercise plan in colder months? (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f38/whats-your-exercise-plan-in-colder-months-30613.html)

Achiever51 10-14-2007 03:58 PM

What's your exercise plan in colder months?
 
The cooler weather is here in the midwest, which means that shortly I'll have to put away my bicycle. This year, I've really enjoyed taking long rides as part of my exercise regime, along with twice a day walks with my dogs.

Shortly the lousy winter weather will blow in, making outdoor exercise difficult -- and then impossible. I have a treadmill, a small trampoline rebounder, fitness cords and exercise DVDs, and I try to work out nearly every day, but it's surely not the same as being outdoors. Moving to a warmer climate is not an option right now. So, for those of you in the northern climates (or anyone else for that matter), any hints on keeping fit during the "indoor" months?

travelover 10-14-2007 04:30 PM

I mall walk. It's cheap unless you buy something.

toofrugalformycat 10-14-2007 04:47 PM

I have a gym habit. It started with required rehabilitation of an injury, but now it's a big part of my daily socialization. It's like jury duty - exposure to a wide range of people I would never otherwise meet. If you have a choice, shop around to find one that suits you.

HFWR 10-14-2007 05:18 PM

Bought a $45 universal machine off Craigslist to replace the fitness center membership, and plan to use that a few days per week. Also like to mall walk. Gets one out of the house, staving off cabin fever, and the scenery, at least in the suburban malls north of Big-D, is very stimulating inspirational... >:D

CybrMike 10-14-2007 05:52 PM

Personal trainer at life time fitness. Otherwise my fat ass can't get motivated to work out.

Ed_The_Gypsy 10-14-2007 05:56 PM

exercise?

kumquat 10-14-2007 06:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Achiever51 (Post 566504)
The cooler weather is here in the midwest, which means that shortly I'll have to put away my bicycle.

I'm not really into exercise, but I live north of the 52nd and a friend from my ex-j*b still rides his bike 365 days/year at 64 years old. It gets down to minus 50F here (but he's still out there), can't be that bad now where you are.

Me, I just shovel snow.

W2R 10-14-2007 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Achiever51 (Post 566504)
The cooler weather is here in the midwest, which means that shortly I'll have to put away my bicycle. This year, I've really enjoyed taking long rides as part of my exercise regime, along with twice a day walks with my dogs.

Shortly the lousy winter weather will blow in, making outdoor exercise difficult -- and then impossible. I have a treadmill, a small trampoline rebounder, fitness cords and exercise DVDs, and I try to work out nearly every day, but it's surely not the same as being outdoors. Moving to a warmer climate is not an option right now. So, for those of you in the northern climates (or anyone else for that matter), any hints on keeping fit during the "indoor" months?

I have spent my entire adult life in warm weather areas, but I plan to retire in southern Missouri where there is (gasp!) SNOW and cold weather.

I plan to continue going to a gym (I do that now, and really enjoy it because it is often too hot to exercise outdoors here).

Also, it may take me a few years to learn to drive in snow and ice. So for that reason, I plan to set up a home gym for days when the weather is really bad. I plan to get a treadmill, exercycle, and other equipment, and set them up in a room with a TV.

I love the variety of equipment at my gym, and could never afford enough to be as happy with my home gym. But I can set something up to get me through cold weather times.

NotSoonEnough 10-14-2007 07:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Achiever51 (Post 566504)
The cooler weather is here in the midwest, which means that shortly I'll have to put away my bicycle.

I have a rule, I don't ride my bike when the outside temp is below 20 degrees F. I ride 10 to 20 miles a day most of the year, and on those days when the temp is lower than the rule I go for a 4 to 6 mile walk instead.

[Edit] I live in SW Idaho...

dumpster56 10-14-2007 07:33 PM

Put on warmer running clothes and go out and continue to run.

sailor 10-14-2007 08:57 PM

Wuss ;)
 
Just dress little warmer.
For inspirations see:
Icebike Home Page
and
Chicago Bike Winter -- Welcome Page

sailor,
year around bicycle commuter
PS: Here is a gift little sailor is getting soon, before morning temps drop below freezing: Bobike Bike A Way Voetenzak Maxi - (eBay item 290056874741 end time Oct-26-07 06:15:20 PDT)

FinallyRetired 10-15-2007 07:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailor (Post 566589)
Just dress little warmer.
For inspirations see:
Icebike Home Page
and
Chicago Bike Winter -- Welcome Page

Any icebreaker sails?

Achiever51 10-15-2007 07:38 AM

Thanks everyone for the good ideas -- I had forgotten completely about mall walking...but then I haven't stepped into a mall since I retired! I'll check it out.

A question for those who ride/run throughout the winter: How do you deal with ice and snow? Seriously, do you go out in that kind of weather? I'm in Michigan and it is not unusual to get snowfalls of 6" or more. I'll get exercise shoveling it, but can't imagine taking a fitness walk/run/ride in it.

travelover 10-15-2007 07:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Achiever51 (Post 566636)
Thanks everyone for the good ideas -- I had forgotten completely about mall walking...but then I haven't stepped into a mall since I retired! I'll check it out.

A question for those who ride/run throughout the winter: How do you deal with ice and snow? Seriously, do you go out in that kind of weather? I'm in Michigan and it is not unusual to get snowfalls of 6" or more. I'll get exercise shoveling it, but can't imagine taking a fitness walk/run/ride in it.

I'm in Michigan and I walk regularly in the ice and snow (when I'm not mall walking). When it gets icy I use Yak Trax on my boots. They really help.

Yaktrax Walker Shoe Traction

smileydog 10-15-2007 08:08 AM

Unless it's raining (which we are wishing for in Atlanta) I hit the road or nearby trails. Treadmill and Eliptical are 2cnd choice - I much prefer being outside.

RunningBum 10-15-2007 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Achiever51 (Post 566636)
A question for those who ride/run throughout the winter: How do you deal with ice and snow? Seriously, do you go out in that kind of weather? I'm in Michigan and it is not unusual to get snowfalls of 6" or more. I'll get exercise shoveling it, but can't imagine taking a fitness walk/run/ride in it.

I love a walk during a snow because it is so quiet. Fewer cars out, and those that are out aren't making so much noise with their tires. I generally don't run while it's snowing/sleeting/cold rain.

Once roads have been plowed and sidewalks shoveled, you're really not dealing with snow and ice, just cold, and you dress in layers appropriately. I run in the middle of the day before melted snow refreezes in places. If there is likely to be some snow and ice on the surface I run in trail shoes, which have a much better grip. Some even use gore tex to help keep the wet out.

After a good snow I also snowshoe on the golf course.

ziggy29 10-15-2007 08:50 AM

We have the opposite problem here in Texas. We hibernate during the hot summer and enjoy the outdoors during the cool winter!

The problem is that summer doesn't seem to want to end and fall is late in arriving. We're paying for the relatively mild weather we had in June and July. Still hitting close to 90 here with regularity.

haha 10-15-2007 10:15 AM

Rain
 
Here on the NW Coast the issue is rain. Only once or twice a year do we get snow at sea level, at least recently.

In the city it isn't bad to just use an umbrella and walk. Up and down hills, you don't really have to run, though plenty people do especially in the typical light drizzle.

For people who have to walk or run on well traveled 2 lane roads, darkness is an issue. It really isn't safe for them.

Weather makes outdoor exercise kind of yucky and hard to embrace, but once started not too bad.

Ha

RunningBum 10-15-2007 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by haha (Post 566699)
Weather makes outdoor exercise kind of yucky and hard to embrace, but once started not too bad.

Ha

Yep, I actually enjoy a nice drizzle once I've started running. It is tougher to get started though. When I do avoid is the cold rain, like 40 degree rain.

Ronstar 10-15-2007 08:08 PM

walking on treadmill and bowflex in front of the tv. But its not as enjoyable as being outside

FinanceDude 10-16-2007 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by travelover (Post 566639)
I'm in Michigan and I walk regularly in the ice and snow (when I'm not mall walking). When it gets icy I use Yak Trax on my boots. They really help.

Yaktrax Walker Shoe Traction

Kinda like chains on trucks in the mountain passes, I like it........;)

W2R 10-16-2007 03:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FinanceDude (Post 567055)
Kinda like chains on trucks in the mountain passes, I like it........;)

Those look great! I'm going to get some in a couple of years when I ER to Missouri and try them out. Thanks! ;D

clifp 10-16-2007 04:49 PM

I put a rash guard on because Hawaii water drops below 80 in the winter...>:D

Nords 10-16-2007 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clifp (Post 567189)
I put a rash guard on because Hawaii water drops below 80 in the winter...>:D

... right after I look for all the open windows in the house and try to remember how to shut them...

Achiever51 10-16-2007 06:15 PM

Okey dokey;), I was wondering how long it would take before the warm weather contingent chimed in. Y'know, it isn't nice to brag!

clifp 10-16-2007 10:37 PM

Hey we pay big bucks for the bragging rights. You guys can get edible tomatoes and apples for under $1/lb we pay $3+/lb for lousy tomatoes. Just today I spent $15 shipping on $35 Halloween Costume (first bought costume in I don't know how long), on site with a zillion banner ads offering free shipping.*

*Free shipping offer good in the lower 48 states, doesn't apply to Alaska or Hawaii...

Linney 10-17-2007 12:04 AM

We had some nice weather in the PNW last weekend so I got to do a 30 mile bike ride. I too prefer outdoor exercise, but I suspect that is in part because non-rainy outdoor time is so precious here.

For colder months I hit the gym and do weight training and a variety of aerobics (elliptical, recumbant bike, circuit training, etc). This provides a built-in variety to the yearly routine -- outdoor activities for late spring/summer/early fall, and then gym work for late fall/winter/early spring.

I do like going to the gym because over the years we have formed social connections there and enjoy seeing some of the same folks who have been there for years as well. Oh, and we use a community gym -- that way we work out with the people who are there because they care about their health, this place doesn't get the 'posers' at least not for long.

--Linney

Linney 10-17-2007 12:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by travelover (Post 566639)
I'm in Michigan and I walk regularly in the ice and snow (when I'm not mall walking). When it gets icy I use Yak Trax on my boots. They really help.

Yaktrax Walker Shoe Traction

I've used the regular ('walker') version as well and it is a good product. Has anyone tried the 'pro' version? Is it worth the extra bucks?

Comparison: Yaktrax Walker and Yaktrax Pro

RunningBum 10-17-2007 06:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Want2retire (Post 567160)
Those look great! I'm going to get some in a couple of years when I ER to Missouri and try them out. Thanks! ;D

You seem really concerned about snow in Missouri, aren't you? Do they really get that much? Springfield, right? Is it hilly? That's the biggest problem in snow. Where it's flat and straight, you just have to drive slower so you can stop where you need to. It's a bit tougher to control on hills.

I'd guess that when they do get snow it melts pretty quickly, so you just have to either keep the pantry stocked in the winter or make a grocery run before a storm hits and just not go out while it's on the roads. But I wouldn't buy too much snow gear until you see if you really need it.

W2R 10-17-2007 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RunningBum (Post 567370)
You seem really concerned about snow in Missouri, aren't you? Do they really get that much? Springfield, right? Is it hilly? That's the biggest problem in snow. Where it's flat and straight, you just have to drive slower so you can stop where you need to. It's a bit tougher to control on hills.

I'd guess that when they do get snow it melts pretty quickly, so you just have to either keep the pantry stocked in the winter or make a grocery run before a storm hits and just not go out while it's on the roads. But I wouldn't buy too much snow gear until you see if you really need it.

Well, I haven't really been in snow much at all in my adult life and yet I am planning to retire to snow country. I would not decribe my attitude as "concerned", so much as "preparing" and "learning". Maybe I am over-preparing? I don't have any idea - - my goal is to be sensible. The stunning girl in my avatar is not me - - in reality, I am 59, nearsighted, and kind of klutzy, and need to be careful to not fall in the snow.

Yes, it's in the Ozarks so it is hilly. They don't get that much snow compared with Buffalo, but they do get that much snow compared with New Orleans! :) I am most definitely planning to keep a well stocked pantry, and to get a well insulated house with a fireplace and an attached garage. I plan to try not to drive during snow, at least during my first few years there, since I do not yet know how to drive (or walk) in the snow safely. I agree - - I have not been planning to buy any snow gear until I get there (including the Yaktrax, see above post). Right now, I am trying to become aware of what is available so that I can see a need, and know what to buy for it, once I am there.

Living in snow is just instinctive to people who have lived in snow. I think they don't really realize how much knowledge they have about it. There's a lot to learn. I have all sorts of things to learn about. Like, if you have a house with a basement, do you have to heat the basement to not get frozen pipes? Or, if you have a car, are snow tires (and changing your tires twice a year) the best solution? I suspect a lot of this varies with location so I will just have to play it by ear when I get there.

Moemg 10-17-2007 06:00 PM

You need all weather tires ,front wheel drive ,a snow blower ,boots ,warm clothes and a bag of sand or kitty litter to carry in the trunk of your car with a snow shovel .

W2R 10-17-2007 06:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moemg (Post 567710)
You need all weather tires ,front wheel drive ,a snow blower ,boots ,warm clothes and a bag of sand or kitty litter to carry in the trunk of your car with a snow shovel .

OK... Thanks! :p Never thought about front wheel drive, or all weather tires. See? I'm learning (slowly but I'll get there).

RunningBum 10-17-2007 09:29 PM

Just making sure you weren't over stressing about it. Sounds like you just want to prepare, and that never hurts. It'll be fun!

Some quick answers...keep the thermostat at least at 55, maybe higher depending on the house; you can wrap pipes with pipe insulation, and leave water dripping slowly on hard freeze nights. Tires--an all-season tire like Goodyear TripleTreds should be fine for that area. I keep a small shovel, cat litter (for traction), and a blanket, cap, warm gloves, etc in my car in winter in case I get stuck, so I won't freeze if I try to dig myself out, or have to stay overnight in the car (latter has never happened). Practice driving in an empty parking lot if you get a chance and learn how to turn in the direction of a skid and how long it takes to stop, and how the antilock brakes will feel.

Darryl 10-17-2007 09:54 PM

Walk outside much of the year but winter is back to the YMCA treadmills rowing machines, nautilus and some raquetball with my son.

W2R 10-18-2007 07:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RunningBum (Post 567775)
Just making sure you weren't over stressing about it. Sounds like you just want to prepare, and that never hurts. It'll be fun!

Some quick answers...keep the thermostat at least at 55, maybe higher depending on the house; you can wrap pipes with pipe insulation, and leave water dripping slowly on hard freeze nights. Tires--an all-season tire like Goodyear TripleTreds should be fine for that area. I keep a small shovel, cat litter (for traction), and a blanket, cap, warm gloves, etc in my car in winter in case I get stuck, so I won't freeze if I try to dig myself out, or have to stay overnight in the car (latter has never happened). Practice driving in an empty parking lot if you get a chance and learn how to turn in the direction of a skid and how long it takes to stop, and how the antilock brakes will feel.

Interesting! Great - - if I can keep the basement at least somewhat cool and wrap the pipes, and let the water drip, then a house with a basement wouldn't necessarily be too much more expensive to heat. These are good things to know. Thanks! I agree that it will be fun (for me). To me, it is a huge adventure. :)

I am also planning to live in town, as opposed to neighboring rural areas, and they do plow the major streets. I'll put all that stuff in the trunk of my car, and I probably wouldn't venture very far from home when weather is bad.

Achiever51 10-18-2007 08:09 AM

Want2Retire --
Don't fret too much about the winter "experience." Except in rare instances -- I'm talking a major, major snowstorm -- you'll be able to get out and about within hours of most snow falls. When I was buying my last car (a rear drive model) I expressed my concern about how it might handle in the snow. The salesman asked me how many days a year did I think we had BAD weather(i.e., bad enough to stop me from driving unless urgent); I thought about it and decided probably 8 to 10 days would fit the bill. I ended up buying the car and haven't had any significant issues driving in the snow, rain, whatever.

And, yes, a basement can be a wonderful thing...as long as it doesn't leak -- but your pre-purchase inspection should reveal that problem if it exists.

travelover 10-18-2007 11:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Want2retire (Post 567819)
Interesting! Great - - if I can keep the basement at least somewhat cool and wrap the pipes, and let the water drip, then a house with a basement wouldn't necessarily be too much more expensive to heat. .........

Basements, being set into the ground, don't need extra heat unless you want to use it for some living activity. In fact, a major savings is to be had in sealing all the heat ducts so they don't leak heat into unheated areas like the basement. And in the heat of the summer, it is cool down there.

lazygood4nothinbum 10-18-2007 03:22 PM

humidity levels are starting to drop. just as soon as "winter" sets in i'm gonna start mountain biking along our florida trails again. love it but summers are just too hot for me. and i'll be able to road bike during the daylight hours instead of late at night. i've got a great light set up for night rides but i go faster when i can see farther.

as for the 10 days between now and next spring when it might dip below 50 degrees, i've got the indoor pool at the gym. i'm set.

edit to add some florida biking trails:

Biking the Lake Okeechobee Trail, Okeechobee, Florida

Everglades National Park: Shark Valley Trails

GORP - Biking Florida - From the Panhandle to the Keys

Club Scrub - Jonathan Dickinson State Park Bike Trails

Florida Trail Reviews at MTBR.com

tangomonster 10-18-2007 03:35 PM

In the winter, I mall walk and do the exercise bike at home.

Local parks here have indoor aquatic centers and offer hour long water aerobics. I can't imagine what a water aerobics class for seniors would be like. Can anyone explain? I'm "only" 53, so I would take the high energy class. When I was young, I would see some seniors exercise in the water and would unkindly refer to it as the baby hippo water ballet waltz---and now years later, here I am contemplating the exercise I ridiculed! Is it possible to get a good workout and not just splash in the water?

Achiever51 10-18-2007 04:39 PM

Water aerobics can be very strenuous...without the strain on your joints. Depends on what exercises you do. Jogging in place in the pool, for example, is a great workout, as are lunges.

Danny 10-19-2007 10:07 AM

The Y and long walks in the woods...

Zoocat 10-20-2007 01:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by travelover (Post 566639)
I'm in Michigan and I walk regularly in the ice and snow (when I'm not mall walking). When it gets icy I use Yak Trax on my boots. They really help.

Yaktrax Walker Shoe Traction

Ditto. Put on my jacket, boots, and, unless it's icy, go hiking on the snowy trails with my dog who gets very excited about winter weather. But I also have a gym membership and use it more during winter.

Zoocat 10-20-2007 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Want2retire (Post 567819)
Interesting! Great - - if I can keep the basement at least somewhat cool and wrap the pipes, and let the water drip, then a house with a basement wouldn't necessarily be too much more expensive to heat. These are good things to know. Thanks! I agree that it will be fun (for me). To me, it is a huge adventure. :)

I am also planning to live in town, as opposed to neighboring rural areas, and they do plow the major streets. I'll put all that stuff in the trunk of my car, and I probably wouldn't venture very far from home when weather is bad.

In Missouri, your biggest winter challenge will be ICE. There are some nasty ice storms in that part of the country. Been there!

W2R 10-20-2007 03:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oldbabe (Post 568641)
In Missouri, your biggest winter challenge will be ICE. There are some nasty ice storms in that part of the country. Been there!

That's when having a big, well stocked pantry, a woodburning fireplace, and YakTrax on my shoes if I venture outside at all, will really help! At least, that is what I am hoping. I am sure that I have a lot to learn.

Moemg 10-20-2007 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Want2retire (Post 568678)
I am sure that I have a lot to learn.


We all do when we move from one climate to the opposite one . Just buy lots of socks and sweaters .

calmloki 10-20-2007 06:51 PM

Bend over to fill multiple cat dishes. Haul in as many loads of wood as the day and evening will require. 2xweek physical therapy for last month's shoulder surgery. Mowing up leaves from the rentals, pruning. Taking abuse from the physical therapist for doing same. Gym maybe 4xweek for treadmill and crunches and stretching.

daystar 10-21-2007 04:04 PM

There's a tiny fitness center in my apartment complex I can use, or what I usually do is go to Bally's.

Achiever51 10-21-2007 09:08 PM

This is what I don't like about living in a climate that gets snow/ice in the winter. Today the temp was 78 -- perfect blue sky -- DH and I spent most of the afternoon cleaning up flower beds, putting down extra mulch, trimming tree branches. So enjoyable just being outside, watching airplane contrails in the sky, eating dinner on the deck....life is good.

Now, fast forward maybe 90 days -- if typical weather patterns hold, the sky, streets, lawns, trees will all be an unappealing grey color, heavy cloud cover, damp air, ugh!

I know, appreciate what you got when you got it, 'cause soon it will be gone!

thefed 10-21-2007 09:24 PM

i hate exercising, BUT for about 2-3 months total per year, i get 'the bug'....i eat well, work out cardio AND weights etc. This tapers of quickly and morphs into eating bad food "because I'll burn it off", the weights only, then nothing


Then once I get to a weight that grosses me out, I begin again....

TargaDave 10-22-2007 01:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clifp (Post 567189)
I put a rash guard on because Hawaii water drops below 80 in the winter...>:D

North Carolina coast requires a drysuit but I get to burn all those extra calories just staying warm. Also plenty of great weather for running-riding.


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