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-   -   What's Your Top Retirement Insight (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f28/whats-your-top-retirement-insight-79626.html)

skipro33 11-24-2015 04:02 PM

I shower a lot less.

I play with the grand children more. (otherwise, I wouldn't shower at all!)

Dave in VA 11-24-2015 04:37 PM

Time for enrichment
 
I loved singing and acting in musicals when I was in school, but never had time during my work life. Retired almost 2 years ago, am now taking voice lessons, sing in a church choir and a small community chorus. Have also been involved in community theater, with roles in productions of "Fiddler on the Roof", and "Annie Get Your Gun".

I think its important to have goals for self improvement and growth, even after you stop working.

kneehigh 11-24-2015 10:37 PM

You define your retirement
 
I love the comments of people here. The nice thing about being retired is that you get to define it anyway you want :)

What's my top retirement insight? I don't know if I have a top insight, but I'd say whatever I'm doing at the moment is the most important thing I can do for myself or for others.

You can actually enjoy just moving whether it's riding a bike, hiking at Koko Head in the middle of a heavy rain, washing the dishes or cooking for the wife. When you move, all those happy hormones moves with you. Smell the roses. Stop and look at the mountains, the beaches and the sky. I wish I had a painter's sight. When he looks out to the distant mountain and sky, he sees things differently every day just like a two year old. How it must be so awesome. Visit the grand-kids. Be creative and laugh with them. It's easy to make them smile and you'll learn a lot from them. The older I get, the more I want what the little ones have--a sense of wonder about the things around them.

Solve the world's problem with your older retired neighbors. They are a gem of wisdom when you share your problems with them. Help someone who can't do things unless you're there. Buy lunch for someone who can't afford it. Laugh and find things to laugh at or with. You cannot take life too seriously. Be brave and learn to forgive so you can laugh again and again. Value the present. It's a gift after all. Look forward to every day. Find your small group to keep you sane and accountable. Rest, anytime you want. Explore with your sight, smell and your mind. Do not take the same road you've always taken. Take the scenic route. Widen your interest. Learn a new trick. Definitely take time to enjoy what you have been given. Don't be jealous of what others have. Some people can't enjoy what they have and they have a lot more than you. The trick is to enjoy and be grateful for what you have. Play those music that makes you happy over and over again.

It's your book and you're the author. The pages are empty. Let your imagination splash across the pages. You'll find that you are an awesome writer. :)

FreeBear 11-24-2015 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kneehigh (Post 1661392)
I love the comments of people here. The nice thing about being retired is that you get to define it anyway you want :)

What's my top retirement insight? I don't know if I have a top insight, but I'd say whatever I'm doing at the moment is the most important thing I can do for myself or for others.

You can actually enjoy just moving whether it's riding a bike, hiking at Koko Head in the middle of a heavy rain, washing the dishes or cooking for the wife. When you move, all those happy hormones moves with you. Smell the roses. Stop and look at the mountains, the beaches and the sky. I wish I had a painter's sight. When he looks out to the distant mountain and sky, he sees things differently every day just like a two year old. How it must be so awesome. Visit the grand-kids. Be creative and laugh with them. It's easy to make them smile and you'll learn a lot from them. The older I get, the more I want what the little ones have--a sense of wonder about the things around them.

Solve the world's problem with your older retired neighbors. They are a gem of wisdom when you share your problems with them. Help someone who can't do things unless you're there. Buy lunch for someone who can't afford it. Laugh and find things to laugh at or with. You cannot take life too seriously. Be brave and learn to forgive so you can laugh again and again. Value the present. It's a gift after all. Look forward to every day. Find your small group to keep you sane and accountable. Rest, anytime you want. Explore with your sight, smell and your mind. Do not take the same road you've always taken. Take the scenic route. Widen your interest. Learn a new trick. Definitely take time to enjoy what you have been given. Don't be jealous of what others have. Some people can't enjoy what they have and they have a lot more than you. The trick is to enjoy and be grateful for what you have. Play those music that makes you happy over and over again.

It's your book and you're the author. The pages are empty. Let your imagination splash across the pages. You'll find that you are an awesome writer. :)

+1 Agreed, and beautifully written kneehigh!

All these things you mentioned that lead to a wonderful life are so much easier in FIRE. We have much more time and emotional bandwidth to enjoy our close friends and passions.

FreeBear 11-24-2015 11:14 PM

I learned that I'm a joyful and positive person. I knew that ER would be good, maybe even great. Still, it's a little surprising to find my days filled with joy.

We've spent perhaps a third of our lives in school in order to prepare for w*rk, then then at least another third at w*rk to buy stuff and save $$. A little joy was squeezed between "getting stuff done" all my life. Now after FIRE joy struts center stage, and everything else waits in line. :dance:

Snowcat 11-24-2015 11:24 PM

So true...joy and happiness. I feel blessed everyday. Maybe it comes from the feeling of 'owning' your day.


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Meadbh 11-25-2015 01:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by throwdownmyaceinthehole (Post 1661263)
i thought i would be thinner and my house would be cleaner. Neither has happened.

+1 😂

Totoro 11-25-2015 05:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sojourner (Post 1660831)
As a single 40-something semi-retiree with no children, (..)

I have also struggled with the "what am I going to do all day" issue pretty often. Even though I do some hourly consulting work for several organizations each week, I still have a lot of free time on my hands and haven't quite come up with a consistently satisfying way of filling those hours yet. I've only been semi-retired for about two years, so it's definitely a learning process that's constantly evolving.

It's a learning curve for me too. I'm pretty much in your situation (35, single, no kids) and still figuring things out. Haven't even ruled going back in the workforce or start a business although I have developed a tremendous dislike of the concept of something basically claiming my entire life all the time.

Did three gigs this year (all part-time), which were fun to do. Now going on a 3 month or longer trip to New Zealand, maybe Korea.

Guess my top retirement insight is not so much retirement related but more flexibility / options related. I have the financial means to say no to a very broad range of suboptimal ways (to me) of arranging my life. So it's up to me now to find an optimal one.

Also someone has/had as a signature that they reinvent FIRE every 5 years. I always really liked that attitude.

Socially I'm trying to fill in the gaps mostly with helping friends out in thinking about their business / career (under the radar) if they let me. Fun to do. Helped structure a pitch for launching a VC fund recently for example.

petershk 11-25-2015 08:35 AM

I was listening to Johnny Cash

"Money can't buy you your youth when you're old... Or you friends when your lonely... Or a love that's grown cold.

The wealthiest man is a pauper at times... compared to the man with a satisfied mind."

Preach Johnny...

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ExFlyBoy5 11-25-2015 08:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Totoro (Post 1661433)
It's a learning curve for me too. I'm pretty much in your situation (35, single, no kids) and still figuring things out. Haven't even ruled going back in the workforce or start a business although I have developed a tremendous dislike of the concept of something basically claiming my entire life all the time.

Did three gigs this year (all part-time), which were fun to do. Now going on a 3 month or longer trip to New Zealand, maybe Korea.

Guess my top retirement insight is not so much retirement related but more flexibility / options related. I have the financial means to say no to a very broad range of suboptimal ways (to me) of arranging my life. So it's up to me now to find an optimal one.

Also someone has/had as a signature that they reinvent FIRE every 5 years. I always really liked that attitude.

Socially I'm trying to fill in the gaps mostly with helping friends out in thinking about their business / career (under the radar) if they let me. Fun to do. Helped structure a pitch for launching a VC fund recently for example.

New Zealand. I have traveled the world and seen A LOT. But I gotta tell you, NZ was definitely my favorite destination. Fabulously nice people, great food, lots to do...oh, it's my closest thing to Heaven on Earth. If you haven't been...I can't recommend it enough.

kimcdougc 11-25-2015 09:12 PM

Why didn't I do it sooner! I was 50 DH 57. Life is pretty good now. No regrets...yet!

frugal-one 11-26-2015 04:29 PM

Insights...
Make a list of the things you want to do and learn.... and start to do them!!!

Make a daily list of things you want to do ... otherwise nothing will be crossed off the list. There is SO much to do that some structure is valuable.

Everyday I am thankful to have the opportunity to be retired... to do what is important to ME. I talk to others that are retired and it is interesting on how we each envision what retirement is. To me, it is the ability to do the things I want to do, with no obligations to anyone else. I refuse to volunteer at this point. I want to do the things that make me happy and do not want the responsibility of commitments. I may change later but for now this is what is important to me!

Tailgate 11-26-2015 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by texcurtis (Post 1660725)
Retired since 1.31.15:
1. How much I enjoy Sunday nights, not having to gear up for work the next day
2. How much I don't miss work (although I enjoyed it most of the time)
3. How much naps are essential for my well being
4. Having time to improve family and friend relationships.
5. Deliberately keeping an open schedule to allow retirement to unfold, allowing new interests to grow in a way I didn't have time prior to retirement.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum

+ all 5.. texcurtis nailed my insights completely!


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