Anxious about retiring so early at 38

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I just do not understand why 30 posters put out so much negativity even if I did sound braggadocios. I was called troll by a moderator, and many others and Porky Pig, racist because I simply mention me mom's ethnicity in a positive salute to her.
Imagine what potential posters might think if they had a background even slightly to the group here.
Proud?
Sir, nobody on this forum would ever refer to you as Porky Pig. Perhaps Porky will post a reply, and you will understand.
 
A little bit, yes.

This is a very welcoming place I find, yet as everywhere has a certain culture. I invite you to take your time to understand it and adapt, or decide it's not for you. As a fellow 38 year old Phd with finance experience, if I can do it, you can too!

If not, why invest your time?
Wait, this board won't accept that you have a PhD:D
How are you adapting to retirement? Miss any of the stress and constant pressure to perform.
Mentioned earlier, at home with a sick best friend, up way early with her, had my clothes on at 4 AM ready to roll. Just joined and mod said, introduce yourself.
I thought that meant details, I should have made it one line.
"Happy to join, 38 wanting to get feedback on what to expect."
Eye opening.
 
OK, but a 10 hour total of 1,202 is the best Fantasy Posting score, ever! $100,000 in ad revenue, I want my share.

Sorry I am leaving for the vet now, back in a bit, bring on the lovely thoughts?
 
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"Happy to join, 38 wanting to get feedback on what to expect."

It does mean details, in an engineer sort of way, not banking MBA style ;)

My background: was FI since a few years ago, took lots of time off (FIRE?), started up a new venture with some others - last time, I swear .. lots of reasons, going back to performance pressure was not one of them :(

What to expect .. dunno .. decompression is a big thing, reverting to former personality traits another, some times all the way back to childhood. Lower threshold for emotional pain, a bit of increased confidence. Having financial backup is a nice crutch to lean on. Beware of social isolation. The usual for retirees applies, regardless of age.

Thing is I guess, in the end, wherever you go, you take yourself with you. Stress doesn't go away, it changes form. Status disappears if you had it, so watch out for that. My brother is miserable without it, I don't mind.

Lots of changes for lots of different folks. The big thing compared to later retirement from what I gathered so far is you still have lots of potential left and energy. Up to you to write the next chapter, whatever it may be.

I especially like this view:
Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - 2012-09-02
 
My OP said "Now we travel about 4 times per year for month long visits. "
Think, could I have meant me traveling to see her 3 times during which time she worked and her visiting me" and not all countries have 1 week per year rules. Outside the US people are allowed much more vacation.

Not sure how you conclude "now its changed", really?

+1
As an "outlier" here, I just wanted to chime in! I enjoy your post's and outside of the "education stuff" I feel a connection and look forward to your sharing in the future. I retired at 33/34 (31 years ago) and still have nightmares about going into work even for one more day.

Too the point of your post: I live in Peru and my young wife still works in the medical field. From day 1, she was entitled to a months vacation each year. She can also carry unused days over into the next year and also earn comp days by working Latin American holidays (there are many) or even weekends.

So far, this year she has taken a month off for our international travel and in two weeks, she will take another month off to visit Amsterdam/Istanbul/Dubai/Brisbane.
 
Why would somebody spent 5 years for a PhD in Physics and then immediately jumped to an MBA accelerated program. As if in these 5 years they had no clue how much people get paid for the teaching profession.

I went from a PhD in computer science to strategy consulting.

You don’t go straight from one program to another.

My brother went from an M.Sc. straight to MBA. Unusual, but I've seen it. Also inverse: after MBA to an accelerated PhD. Depends also on the MBA type. Stanford or Kellogg would've been nigh impossible since they want some work experience, but many don't require it.
 
It does mean details, in an engineer sort of way, not banking MBA style ;)

My background: was FI since a few years ago, took lots of time off (FIRE?), started up a new venture with some others - last time, I swear .. lots of reasons, going back to performance pressure was not one of them :(

What to expect .. dunno .. decompression is a big thing, reverting to former personality traits another, some times all the way back to childhood. Lower threshold for emotional pain, a bit of increased confidence. Having financial backup is a nice crutch to lean on. Beware of social isolation. The usual for retirees applies, regardless of age.

Thing is I guess, in the end, wherever you go, you take yourself with you. Stress doesn't go away, it changes form. Status disappears if you had it, so watch out for that. My brother is miserable without it, I don't mind.

Lots of changes for lots of different folks. The big thing compared to later retirement from what I gathered so far is you still have lots of potential left and energy. Up to you to write the next chapter, whatever it may be.

I especially like this view:
Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - 2012-09-02

I like the comments, and I am already feeling social isolation missing lots of colleague get togethers. I think Ive decompressed but who knows, sometimes feel like going over and asking what's up? But don't.

Status is fine since I was way down the chain, most were 30-40 year pros, me stuck with small potato dealings. So I'm fine being considered laid-off, unable to find work.

And like your brother, mine wanted his status, so much so he named his business John Doe, Inc. And went to conventions in Vegas dressed way out of character.

Thanks, as for next chapter, I've been wanting to try culinary school, next Paul Bocuse? Or maybe mayor of Sequim, WA.
 
I went from a PhD in computer science to strategy consulting.

I think this is common, Phd can go into consulting or hedge fund.

My brother went from an M.Sc. straight to MBA. Unusual, but I've seen it. Also inverse: after MBA to an accelerated PhD. Depends also on the MBA type. Stanford or Kellogg would've been nigh impossible since they want some work experience, but many don't require it.

I think this is also not unusual. Google CEO did it.

But I doubt from a PhD in Physics to accelerated MBA. You go from deep thinking to not deep thinking. I googled and there’s about 5 accelerated programs in Southen California. CSULB is one of them. I’m not sure graduates from these programs make more than a low teaching salary. Graduates from these non top MBA programs are not highly thought off. I doubt about the Golmand Sack employment also. If somebody has connection, why is it necessary to get one of these accelerated MBAs.
 
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+1
As an "outlier" here, I just wanted to chime in! I enjoy your post's and outside of the "education stuff" I feel a connection and look forward to your sharing in the future. I retired at 33/34 (31 years ago) and still have nightmares about going into work even for one more day.

Too the point of your post: I live in Peru and my young wife still works in the medical field. From day 1, she was entitled to a months vacation each year. She can also carry unused days over into the next year and also earn comp days by working Latin American holidays (there are many) or even weekends.

So far, this year she has taken a month off for our international travel and in two weeks, she will take another month off to visit Amsterdam/Istanbul/Dubai/Brisbane.
Lucky dog, early retirement + Peru is a dream for me and Miraflores is also a dream. Yeah, being roasted here about mentioning "month off" but wait till you visit Brisbane, the Aussies get 3 months off after long-term status. And a one-time 6 month break after 10 years I will strongly advocate eating tons of Moreton Bay bugs, on the deck of an old trawler at east side of downtown. Will be a great treat when washed down by a cold VB. Trip sounds great, enjoy. Oh, also in Australia, if you like wine, the McLaren Vale and Barossa Valley varieties are superb. Travel, travel, travel.
 
Exactly. They probably never met the Nigerians and Persians. Amy Chua would disagree with OP. Here is a link to other culture that she thinks are exceptional.

https://nypost.com/2014/01/04/tiger-mom-some-groups-are-just-better-than-others/


I also have doubt about the timeline. Why would somebody spent 5 years for a PhD in Physics and then immediately jumped to an MBA accelerated program. As if in these 5 years they had no clue how much people get paid for the teaching profession. Unbelievable naive, or bad trolling. Also it takes time to apply to these programs. You don’t go straight from one program to another. If you do, It means you plan very well. So the naive part even comes into question. Again I keep coming back to bad trolling.[/QUOTE

So just curious what's "good trolling":dance:

Funny how some folks use distortion. I discovered the prospects of working as an instructor for years about 3 years into the process and jumping ship at that point would have been a wasted, I'm now Dr. Antsy with a MBA. I applied for MBA 8 months before acceptance, so can you support your opinion by providing any actual facts as to what you assert is a valid application time, as usual, no you cannot.
 
I thought from the guy who rode the van with me, he graduated from one low level UC with a PhD in Computer Engineering, not even Computer Science, he’s pretty smart(Persian) and he sweated so much that he’s absolutely terrified of the time he had to defend his thesis. In fact, he didn’t know he passed until very late. I’m sure there are some geniuses out there who could take the GMAT test, getting letter of recommendations from your professor, etc.. yeah, like I said, many doubts.
 
I went from a PhD in computer science to strategy consulting.



My brother went from an M.Sc. straight to MBA. Unusual, but I've seen it. Also inverse: after MBA to an accelerated PhD. Depends also on the MBA type. Stanford or Kellogg would've been nigh impossible since they want some work experience, but many don't require it.

Just chiming in, example, my best friend is brilliant and he went to Georgia Tech for undergrad engineering, joined me at USC for grad school, then MBA and about 3 years later decided to pursue medical school at U of F. Quit year 2 disgusted that students with the good-ole-daddy is a doctor treatment.

He went to Loral in Sunnyvale and became the Chief Scientist.

So adapting to you situation is very hard for some to fathom, sad.
 
I thought from the guy who rode the van with me, he graduated from one low level UC with a PhD in Computer Engineering, not even Computer Science, he’s pretty smart(Persian) and he sweated so much that he’s absolutely terrified of the time he had to defend his thesis. In fact, he didn’t know he passed until very late. I’m sure there are some geniuses out there who could take the GMAT test, getting letter of recommendations from your professor, etc.. yeah, like I said, many doubts.

Defending a thesis IS terrifying because the professors are there to uphold the university reputation, not feel bad they are destroying you. I recall a fellow candidate saying he didn't tell his parents when he was scheduled for fear of being rejected.

The process causes suicides, you worked your ass off, done everything asked of you, in severe debt and needing a job and a privilege Ivory Tower group judges you.

The process rendered Ted Kaczynski, supposedly a great kid all his life.
 
Defending a thesis IS terrifying because the professors are there to uphold the university reputation, not feel bad they are destroying you. I recall a fellow candidate saying he didn't tell his parents when he was scheduled for fear of being rejected.

The process causes suicides, you worked your ass off, done everything asked of you, in severe debt and needing a job and a privilege Ivory Tower group judges you.

The process rendered Ted Kaczynski, supposedly a great kid all his life.

Sounds similar to wading full throttle into a forum.
 
Thanks for the interesting discussion. As always, this serves as a reminder to refresh ourselves on the community rules (link at bottom of the page).

Including, importantly:

"Friends don't always agree on everything or even on most things. They can agree to disagree. When that happens, they try to keep their discussions logical and free from name calling and so forth, or more often they just spend their time on other topics. They don't take every opportunity to express their disagreement, incite argument, insult each other, and fan flames."


 
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