Electric rates throughout the year?

Surewhitey

Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
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Mar 5, 2011
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North TX
So my 3 yr contract is coming to the end & my choices jump from $.10/kwh to ~$.15/kwh (for another 3 years). What's your experience with fluctuations of rates or is this the "new normal" I need to expect?

I know the $.10 was awesome, even at the time, just a hard pill to swallow... We're in DFW and our options are Constellation (current & slightly more) and Shell.
 
So my 3 yr contract is coming to the end & my choices jump from $.10/kwh to ~$.15/kwh (for another 3 years). What's your experience with fluctuations of rates or is this the "new normal" I need to expect?

I know the $.10 was awesome, even at the time, just a hard pill to swallow... We're in DFW and our options are Constellation (current & slightly more) and Shell.
We don't have choices like that with Hawaiian Electric. They are moving to at least "some" form of time of day metering, but they're vague on the details. We average about $0.40/KWh once all the little "extras" are added in.

I'm pretty sure our rates are going up (way up) to cover HECO's liability for the Lahaina Maui fires, but details are also lacking.
 
We don't have choices like that with Hawaiian Electric. They are moving to at least "some" form of time of day metering, but they're vague on the details. We average about $0.40/KWh once all the little "extras" are added in.

I'm pretty sure our rates are going up (way up) to cover HECO's liability for the Lahaina Maui fires, but details are also lacking.
That's crazy high, but I have to believe you don't use as much as us TX folk. I'm in a small 1150 sq ft home and we range from 700-1600 kwh / mo.
 
FWIW, my new mini-split heat pump has cut my electric bill (I had electric base board heating) by $54 a month. I’m on a level payment plan so the cost and the new savings are spread out over 12 months. It won’t pay for itself, but I am also warmer in the winter and have AC for the few Summer weeks when I really need it.

I read an interesting article the other day by an economist. He thinks that as more and more people acquire EVs and charge them overnight, night time will become the new peak rate time or at least lose its luster as a lower cost off-peak time.
 
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That's crazy high, but I have to believe you don't use as much as us TX folk. I'm in a small 1150 sq ft home and we range from 700-1600 kwh / mo.
I know folks with $400 electric bills, but, fortunately, our 1100sf condo is oriented with the trade winds and we do not have (or need) AC. Our hot water is included in our HOA dues, so our typical monthly electric bill is around $70. Our daily/monthly usage is about 5/150 KWh.
 
FWIW, my new mini-split heat pump has cut my electric bill (I had electric base board heating) by $54 a month. I’m on a level payment plan so the cost and the new savings are spread out over 12 months. It won’t pay for itself, but I am also warmer in the winter and have AC for the few Summer weeks when I really need it.

I read an interesting article the other day by an economist. He thinks that as more and more people acquire EVs and charge them overnight, night time will become the new peak rate time or at least lose its luster as a lower cost off-peak time.
We don't have an option for peak vs non peak. They have gimmicks like free nights or weekends, but base rate is so high, it doesn't work.

I did see an EV option that was good, but they require you actually have an EV. Apparently they get a tax credit from the gubmint but have to verify the EV.
 
I know folks with $400 electric bills, but, fortunately, our 1100sf condo is oriented with the trade winds and we do not have (or need) AC. Our hot water is included in our HOA dues, so our typical monthly electric bill is around $70. Our daily/monthly usage is about 5/150 KWh.
Yeah, location makes a big difference. We have friends with a condo in Minden, NV & don't have an a/c in their condo as it's dry heat & drops dramatically in the evening.

We have the curse of high humidity and heat. We also run a dehumidifier half the year too, but nat gas heat and hot water as a plus.
 
We have very low rates, but we and all customers pay a fixed "Basic Utility Charge" of $48/month plus a usage charge. Our usage rates are 7.67 ¢/kWh in Summer and 7.29 ¢/kWh in Winter. There are a couple small fees as well, just a couple $/month. I know we are lucky, not complaining...

Our utility is running a pilot program offering peak and non-peak rates, but that's not available to all customers (yet). I did the math and I am not sure I'd save $ on that program even though I do all my EV charging at night. AC in Summer is our biggest load by far (annually so of course summer months), and it runs mostly during peak hours when rates would be MUCH higher.
 
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Sounds like you have a pretty good deal. Like many here we can't choose our power provider. For your reference we live in a much more moderate climate here (we're on one of the "mountains" surrounding Chattanooga and we have a newly constructed home (1900 sq ft) that's well insulated and sealed (with an air exchange system). Last year our monthly electric bill (for heating/AC/water) averaged 664 kWh/month and an average bill of $83/month ($0.125/kWh). I'm not sure if there are any increases planned in our near future...
 
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Our rates are flat and they went from $0.13/kWh to $0.17/kWh within the last couple years. We have no other choice. I don't think $0.15 is bad at all especially if it is locked in for 3 years. Ours goes up every year.
 
We pay $0.11/kWH, plus a meter charge of $11/month, same as a year ago. It's one of a handful of municipal-owned utilities in Wisconsin. The employees all live in the municipality. When the power goes out, which doesn't happen very often (usually a fallen tree), it gets fixed fast.
 
IIRC TX is unique in running its own grid and not being connected nationally. If that's the case, non-TX SGOTI's advice will probably be off the mark. I'd start with whatever consumer information is available from your state utilities commission and from large TX newspapers.

FWIW for others our facilities charge for our city house is about $10/month and the lake house is $50. The lake house coop utility has many more miles of line per subscriber so the cost per subscriber is much higher.
 
We pay $0.11/kWH, plus a meter charge of $11/month, same as a year ago. It's one of a handful of municipal-owned utilities in Wisconsin. The employees all live in the municipality. When the power goes out, which doesn't happen very often (usually a fallen tree), it gets fixed fast.
I guess I live in the wrong part of Wisconsin. Our only option is WE Energies. We get a combined bill for gas and electric. The base charge for electric is $15 just to have access to the service then $0.17154/kWh.
 
I am so jealous of all you folks! We produce most of our electricity with imported oil. We have a very small amount produced by solar panels and even smaller amount produced by windmill.

We used to (maybe still do) import stuff like palm oil to burn to get our "renewable" fraction higher. Nearly as I can recall, electricity produced by imported oil is the cheapest, but that data could be wrong now.

I know that we have virtually reached our limit of solar because HECO can't integrate any more into the grid because of the variable nature of the generation.

We are probably THE state in the nation which COULD go all solar (maybe some wind thrown in) but we can't store the electricity nor can we integrate the ups and downs as sun and clouds do their thing. Kinda sad, really. We have a great "source" of energy, but can't really make use of it with current infrastructure.

I do wonder what our rates could be if we went all solar. Certainly at the beginning, rates would go way up - just to cover the storage costs and changing over to the systems required to integrate variable loads and inputs. I don't think I'll live to see it happen. We pass laws and "goals" then go back to "business as usual." YMMV
 
I am so jealous of all you folks! We produce most of our electricity with imported oil. We have a very small amount produced by solar panels and even smaller amount produced by windmill.

We used to (maybe still do) import stuff like palm oil to burn to get our "renewable" fraction higher. Nearly as I can recall, electricity produced by imported oil is the cheapest, but that data could be wrong now.

I know that we have virtually reached our limit of solar because HECO can't integrate any more into the grid because of the variable nature of the generation.

We are probably THE state in the nation which COULD go all solar (maybe some wind thrown in) but we can't store the electricity nor can we integrate the ups and downs as sun and clouds do their thing. Kinda sad, really. We have a great "source" of energy, but can't really make use of it with current infrastructure.

I do wonder what our rates could be if we went all solar. Certainly at the beginning, rates would go way up - just to cover the storage costs and changing over to the systems required to integrate variable loads and inputs. I don't think I'll live to see it happen. We pass laws and "goals" then go back to "business as usual." YMMV

I wonder if your utility could not invest in storage to store that intermittent energy and release it as needed. I am currently permitting a 40 acre battery farm that is filled with 20' long sea containers filled with lithium batteries plus a substation to bump up the voltage to 230KV. This is instead of a "peaking" plant to handle those peaks of the day.
 
I wonder if your utility could not invest in storage to store that intermittent energy and release it as needed. I am currently permitting a 40 acre battery farm that is filled with 20' long sea containers filled with lithium batteries plus a substation to bump up the voltage to 230KV. This is instead of a "peaking" plant to handle those peaks of the day.
+1. It would seem large scale battery storage (e.g. Megapack farms) would have to be part of any workable solution to integration solar and wind. There has to be a buffer like a battery to (time shift) smooth usage and generation with or without conventional power plants. Net metering isn't helpful at all in the broad scheme of things.
 
I wonder if your utility could not invest in storage to store that intermittent energy and release it as needed. I am currently permitting a 40 acre battery farm that is filled with 20' long sea containers filled with lithium batteries plus a substation to bump up the voltage to 230KV. This is instead of a "peaking" plant to handle those peaks of the day.
If someone is gonna stick a shovel in the ground, it takes 2 years to get a permit, so, NO. It won't happen until the whole process locally is overhauled. Like I said - I don't expect it in my life time but YMMV.
 
Adding in all the various fees and taxes, we paid an average of 9¢ from 2015 through 2020, 11¢ in 2021, 12¢ in 2023, and so far 14¢ this year. So the increase has been steady, but only in recent years.
Roughly the Cincinnati area.
 
14.3¢ is how mine worked out last bill. That's all metered charges without the base customer charge. I'm on time-of day but with my low usage it is pretty break-even with the standard flat rate (save like $10/year).
 
I was close to you... I had a 9 cent rate for 3 years and it expired late last year... I held off buying a new plan and was just doing month to month as gas prices were dropping and I was expecting to see a drop in rates... NOPE.. they went up... finally bit the bullet and bought at 14.1 cents...

I think it is the new normal...
 
You made me look.

Usage rate was $0.102/kWh last month

Adding in the fixed charges and taxes it totaled out to $0.128/kWh

Usage last month was 537 kWh

Technically this was still the winter rate. It will go higher next month, as will the usage.
 
I am so jealous of all you folks! We produce most of our electricity with imported oil. We have a very small amount produced by solar panels and even smaller amount produced by windmill.
...

The majority of Hawaii is primarily oil, as you said.
Solar and wind though aren't a tiny amount. They look to account for about 25%.
Battery storage also exists today, and more appears to be planned.

 
The majority of Hawaii is primarily oil, as you said.
Solar and wind though aren't a tiny amount. They look to account for about 25%.
Battery storage also exists today, and more appears to be planned.

Yeah, it very much depends on how you look at the numbers and the site doesn't make that easy. It's true that the "system" CAN produce a LOT of renewable energy. But that doesn't mean it all gets used and that the oil-produced electricity can be retired. Lots of the electricity is produced by boilers and those don't come on line when the clouds roll in. I think we have some "peaking" turbines, but even those don't react quickly enough to deal with sudden clouds. I've seen our skies go from clear to totally overcast in less than 10 minutes.

The sun shines a lot in the Islands, but we have whole weeks of overcast from time to time. Heh, heh, and then there are those pesky nights! :facepalm: Also, the battery storage is a pittance of the amount that can be produced from solar and wind. So if I had to put money down on the actual usage of renewable energy compared to the total usage, I'd be closer to 10% than the 30% which the site seems to be trying to imply. Call me skeptical and I won't even flinch.

I still maintain that storage capacity is the limiting factor. The average amount of sun we receive should be way more than adequate to generate our energy.

Even though I live in the Islands, I have no special insight into the subject except that I've seen HECO in action for 17 years. Their veracity remains in question for me, but YMMV.
 
We are in DFW with 10KW solar install so I had a very few companies who actually offered buyback at retail price. We average 1500 KWH/month net after solar generation on a 2500 sqft home (all mini-splits). We locked-in a 3 year contract at 10c about a year ago. I wouldn't hesitate to lock in at 15c when time comes. You really don't have much choice other than what market dictates. I prefer a fixed price plan to avoid any winter storm surprise billing.
 
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