Good Regional Food

yakers

Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
Messages
3,348
Location
Pasadena CA
Is there still good regional food that is worth traveling for? If I had to pick one region for food it would be New Orleans/Cajun country. I have had good Cajun food elsewhere but there are so many good places that ‘the good drives out the bad’. I like the Mexican food in New Mexico more than Cal-Mex or Tex-Mex or even most of the food I had in Mexico. The best lobster I had was in Maine, don’t know why, the area is known for lobster but why is their’s better? Is salmon better in the Pacific NW or is it equally available everywhere now? Oh, yeah, I’m originally a Chicago boy and the pizza there is great. I have found decent stuff now & then around the country but it is consistently good there, another case of ‘the good driving out the bad’.

I guess what I am looking for is if I am out on a road trip what is available in specific locals that is not readily available everywhere that I should not miss?
 
I really want to do a BBQ roadtrip. I've been to most of the spots, but I want to make a round trip of it.

I'd head down to Memphis for some dry rubbed ribs, Carolina for pork shoulder, texas for brisket and hot links, and wind it up through Kansas city.

I would stop for an angioplasty somehwhere in the middle.
 
Any bbq recommendations in St. Louis? I'll be there for a couple of nights next week...

Also, any suggestions in Atlanta?

saluki9 said:
I really want to do a BBQ roadtrip. I've been to most of the spots, but I want to make a round trip of it.

I'd head down to Memphis for some dry rubbed ribs, Carolina for pork shoulder, texas for brisket and hot links, and wind it up through Kansas city.

I would stop for an angioplasty somehwhere in the middle.
 
Peaceful_Warrior said:
Any bbq recommendations in St. Louis? I'll be there for a couple of nights next week...

Also, any suggestions in Atlanta?

Suprisingly St. Louis is not a hotspot for BBQ. When I'm there I usually spend my dining energy and $$$ on italian food on "the hill" cunettos is my favorite http://www.cunetto.com/

One place that others have mentioned is Bandanas which has a bunch of bbq restaurants in St. Louis. I have not been there, but they do use the real Southern Pride smokers which is always a good start.

http://www.bandanasbbq.com/Flash/locations.htm

If you're nuts like I am you would drive 90 minutes to Murphysboro IL and go to 17th Street BBQ and Grill. The owner Mike Mills has won the Memphis in May competition 3 times I believe. It good enough that it's worth the drive!

As for Atlanta, I'm usually with clients when I'm there and don't get to look for good food on my own. That being said, check out the smoke ring forums, they are a very good source. http://www.thesmokering.com/forum/index.php
 
saluk -

Do yourself a favor and go during the "Blues Fest", best of both worlds. First weekend in May I believe. I always try to go but it usually conflicts with Derby weekend.
 
Peaceful_Warrior said:
Any bbq recommendations in St. Louis? I'll be there for a couple of nights next week...

Also, any suggestions in Atlanta?
we ordered on line from corkys in memphis. the ribs were flown out over night and were simply amazing
 
mathjak107 said:
we ordered on line from corkys in memphis. the ribs were flown out over night and were simply amazing

Can't go wrong with Corky's. I just ate at one last week in Jackson, MS. I'm gonna put in a plug for another bbq restaurant known as 'Moe's Original Bbq' located in Vail, Colorado and in Gulf Shores, AL. My nephew is a partner in the business and manages the one in Gulf Shores. Not a fancy place, but great bbq. If you are in the area, you might want to try it.

http://www.moesoriginalbbq.com/
 
yakers said:
Is there still good regional food that is worth traveling for? If I had to pick one region for food it would be New Orleans/Cajun country. I have had good Cajun food elsewhere but there are so many good places that ‘the good drives out the bad’. I like the Mexican food in New Mexico more than Cal-Mex or Tex-Mex or even most of the food I had in Mexico. The best lobster I had was in Maine, don’t know why, the area is known for lobster but why is their’s better? Is salmon better in the Pacific NW or is it equally available everywhere now? Oh, yeah, I’m originally a Chicago boy and the pizza there is great. I have found decent stuff now & then around the country but it is consistently good there, another case of ‘the good driving out the bad’.

I guess what I am looking for is if I am out on a road trip what is available in specific locals that is not readily available everywhere that I should not miss?

Italy. 8)
 
yakers said:
Is there still good regional food that is worth traveling for?
Thai.

Especially northern Thai.

Kao soi... mmmm....
 
Martha said:
Come visit and have head cheese and viilia. um um good :p

Head cheese on rye with a touch of mustard.

Yum.
 
Khan said:
Head cheese on rye with a touch of mustard.

Yum.

Maybe some blood sausage for color?

We have made special trips to Thunder Bay, Ontario to eat beige food at the Hoito. :)
 
Blood sausage, head cheese, onion butter(milk comes out funny when cows gorge themselves on spring onions)...

I grew up on a farm with German/Polish immigrant maternal grandparents, and tenants and neighbors who were central European refugees; and paternal grandparents were small farmers in rural Maine.
 
Khan said:
Head cheese
Just in case there's one or two of you readers who don't know what head cheese is, I looked it up and I'm heartily sorry that I did so. Ignorance is bliss.

You head-cheese eaters should be permanently banned from donating blood. I thought the lutefisk & haggis threads were bad enough. Bleagh!
 
Nords said:
Just in case there's one or two of you readers who don't know what head cheese is, I looked it up and I'm heartily sorry that I did so. Ignorance is bliss.

You head-cheese eaters should be permanently banned from donating blood. I thought the lutefisk & haggis threads were bad enough. Bleagh!

Movin' in on 20 gallons on blood donation.

They don't ask about haggis or head cheese.

:D
 
Copper River Salmon from Alaska is the best in the world. It's expensive but worth every penny (about $14 - $20 a pound if I remember correctly). You start seeing it around mid-May in the PNW.
 
Trek said:
Copper River Salmon from Alaska is the best in the world. It's expensive but worth every penny (about $14 - $20 a pound if I remember correctly). You start seeing it around mid-May in the PNW.

OH NO! Don't start the salmon debate again! I don't think I can deal with another one of those threads.
 

Yep.. kinda hard to get here on a road trip.. DH's current breakfast cold-cut (we go for bread and cheese or ham over a cereal or other sweet breakfast) is head cheese. I took a pic to show my sister. I can't stand the sight of it but DH loves it.

The reason lobster is so good from Maine is the cold ocean water which is where they live/grow best.

I remember growing up in RI there were some specific foods unavailable elsewhere.. none of them particularly good for you:

• Hot weenies.. these are particular, small hot dogs with a Vienna-sausage-style form, topped with raw onions, celery salt, and a type of mildly peppery meat sauce (NOT to be confused with chili).The little diner/dives that served these have all but disappeared.. they were always named "So&So's NY System" but AFAIK there is no link to NY.

Edit: Sliced hot dog roll ONLY (please, no buns with the crust all around.. those are NOT hot dog rolls)!

Either I remembered badly or things have changed.. as the pictures here show:
http://www.olneyvillenysystem.com/photos.asp
All the other kinds of "regular" hotdogs, lobster rolls and so forth used sliced rolls. When at some point we began to see "whole" hotdog buns in the supermarket it was a novelty as far as home use was concerned.

Anyway the weenies are often very small.. 2-3/person is usual

• Clam cakes.. Deep-fried fritters with bits of chopped-up clam. Served at the beach. I can hear the surf now.

• Fried squid with hot peppers.. before "calamari" became the rage. Take your regular fried calamari and  put some slices of jarred hot cherry peppers over it.

Also particular to my childhood but which I have not seen elsewhere were tiny fried bay scallops.. the size of one of your top finger joints.. mmmm.. sWEET and good!

• Quahogs, esp. stuffed quahogs.. A kind of giant clam.

• Coffee milk and coffee ice cream.. Mom always kept some "Autocrat" coffee syrup in the cupboard as an alternative to Hershey's. Slogan: "a swallow will tell you" (icon of a yellow bird). Coffee ice cream is common everywhere now but when I was growing up people outside of our area had never heard of it. My sister when she moved out to LA would "import" Autocrat syrup for coffee milk.

A couple other Italian-influenced RI items:
• Doughboys (fried dough.. but should be very light and digestible)
• Del's lemonade.. a summer staple. A kind of very fine lemon slush w/fresh lemons made to order.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1677.jpg
    IMG_1677.jpg
    32.4 KB · Views: 11
  • IMG_1677.jpg_thumb
    36.3 KB · Views: 3
The gullah cuisine of coastal Carolina is worth a trip; the culture probably won't survive development pressures in the area.
I'll post my low country shrimp & grits recipe when I find it.
 
That's one of the things we really enjoy about our RVing lifestyle.

We have been known to extend our trip when running into a area with exceptional regional cuisine. Most memorable - Cajun area around Mardi Gras. Stopped near Lafayette LA for a week fo visit a friend and some local wildlife sanctuaries. We extended our stay another week because of restaurant crawling. The food was so good we had to stay to revisit several places, plus we were in the peak of crawfish season!! Oh my! Them cajuns sure know how to eat!

And we are always excited to travel through New Mexico to get a fix for wonderful NM style traditional mexican food. It's worth an extra couple of days.

And we enjoy all coasts - fresh regional seafood - wonderful!

When we visited our RV factory in Yakima Washington for some repairs, we took advantage of the incredible array of regional wineries and summer seasonal fruits (like cherries!!!!).

And then Oregon is well known for great brew pubs......

I'm just getting started here!!!!

Audrey
 
Back
Top Bottom