How to Position Investments for the Coming Depression?

Sure they would (stand again in line for soup)!!! People will do what they have to do to survive - personally I have stood in line for cheese as a child on more than one occasion. I'm quite confident people will adapt and make do.

hmmm...surplus government cheese loaf...:p I bet goes well with a slice of "spammo"...I am still thinking that is part of "solution"...learning more basic survival skills esp. if you learned how to live on less growing up if the economy dumped by 50% or more....you would learn to live without starbucks...
 
hmmm...surplus government cheese loaf...:p I bet goes well with a slice of "spammo"...I am still thinking that is part of "solution"...learning more basic survival skills esp. if you learned how to live on less growing up if the economy dumped by 50% or more....you would learn to live without starbucks...

What are "starbucks"? Is that the proposed new US currency now that the dollar has dropped in value?
 
Okay - to indulge in such morbid fantasies...

The original poster made no mention of inflation - I assume it stays close to 0 (he did say deflationary period)

In that case, the scenario is not that scary. A 30% decline in the market (assume that the DOW represents the market) & staying flat from there for 10 years has already been factored into the SWR studies that are often cited here. If you've got a good asset allocation - say 60% equities & 40% bonds, you should be fine! If you're diversified internationally & in even more uncorrelated assets, even better.

Stick to your AA with regular rebalancing, choose a withdrawal strategy that's shown to last 40+ years, be conservative in your spending and get a part-time job if you must. You'll be set for when the market does start up. 10 years for an early retiree isn't that long a time.
 
Booze probably did pretty good 1933 and on. Bootleggers probably did pretty well the 13 years before that :)

My grandparents and greatuncles/aunts on my Dad's side of the family, kept the family going throughout the "Great Depression" through their bootlegging operations in the St. Louis area. Booze provided a steady stream of income, when they didn't have jobs or paychecks to rely on.....it also provided weekly "bonus" cash to the local beat cop. My Dad said the beat cop was like Shultz on Hogan's Heros......."I see nothing! I know nothing!" He had a family to feed too. :rolleyes:
 
My mom tells the story of having to eat a squirrel. Everybody came out fine and did very well afterwards, but it was scarring.

Dang! Scarring? We ate a lot of squirrel while I was growing up, and we always looked at as something special! We'd go hunting and bag a bunch of those bushy-tailed tree rats, bring 'em home and clean 'em, then my Mom or Grandma would fry 'em up. Tasty! Same for rabbits (sorry CFB), pheasant, quail, 'coon, and miscellaneous other critters.

There's a sh*tload of bushy-tailed tree rats running all over the place around here.....just waiting for the [-]End of the World[/-] "Coming Depression" so they can be pan fried for my dining pleasure.....just hope it doesn't cause any 'scarring'. ;)
 
Heck rabbits,pheasant,quail, turtles all good eating. Never had coon though. Gator isnt bad either. See be at ease worriers lots of good eats running around outside. Look at a Great Depression as a way to broaden your horizons.
 
You also do not want to have any debt. Good luck with that.

I heard the same thing on a local radio program and I wondered why this is so. I was thinking that I would conserve cash and not pay down debts in hopes of negotiating lower rates. Wouldn't rates be ultra-low in a depression? ...or would loans be called and credit be non-existant?
 
Heck rabbits,pheasant,quail, turtles all good eating. Never had coon though. Gator isnt bad either. See be at ease worriers lots of good eats running around outside. Look at a Great Depression as a way to broaden your horizons.

My neighbor and his pals go 'turtling' once or twice a year and bring home 25-30 snappers each time. After he butchers them he either give us some to cook up ourselves, or else he has us over to eat. I've got a great neighbor! He also supplies us with venison and fish.

One of my buddies makes the best BBQ 'coon around. He used to take it to church potlucks, and most folks thought it was chicken. ;)

I've eaten a lot of deep-fried gator......and boiled crawfish, jambalaya, gumbo, etouffée, and my favorite (which I had Friday for supper) red beans & rice! It's nice having a Cajun restaurant a few miles away.
 
I heard the same thing on a local radio program and I wondered why this is so. I was thinking that I would conserve cash and not pay down debts in hopes of negotiating lower rates. Wouldn't rates be ultra-low in a depression? ...or would loans be called and credit be non-existant?

Inflation is good for debt -- the principal is worth less with time.

Deflation is bad for debt -- the principal is worth more with time, so you wouldn't want to keep debt. Most people associate a depression with deflation.

Frankly, I don't care if it's a depression, a recession, stagflation, slow-growth, deflation, or inflation. I just want my purchasing power to increase with time -- all the time. :)
 
If you really believe it and you are not a kid, buy an SPIA. Or, better, research your state annuity guarantees and buy several small SPIAs from different insurers. Better get em now while you still have the funds.
 
Heck rabbits,pheasant,quail, turtles all good eating. Never had coon though. Gator isnt bad either. See be at ease worriers lots of good eats running around outside. Look at a Great Depression as a way to broaden your horizons.

There are mighty fine Canadian geese roaming all the golf courses up here near Chicago--just one of those ought to feed a family of six to eight and help out the golf course, too.
 
My neighbor and his pals go 'turtling' once or twice a year and bring home 25-30 snappers each time. After he butchers them he either give us some to cook up ourselves, or else he has us over to eat. I've got a great neighbor! He also supplies us with venison and fish.

One of my buddies makes the best BBQ 'coon around. He used to take it to church potlucks, and most folks thought it was chicken. ;)

I've eaten a lot of deep-fried gator......and boiled crawfish, jambalaya, gumbo, etouffée, and my favorite (which I had Friday for supper) red beans & rice! It's nice having a Cajun restaurant a few miles away.

He is a good neighbor if he cleans the turtle for you. Hard to skin :bat:
 
If we go into a Depression.....so will I.........:)
 
There are mighty fine Canadian geese roaming all the golf courses up here near Chicago--just one of those ought to feed a family of six to eight and help out the golf course, too.

I suggested to the local grocery store that they should sponsor a goose roundup (retention ponds): people could pay a small fee to catch the geese; local folks could pay to set up booths/tents where they would offer plucking/gutting/cooking services.

This would provide food to people, provide money to local entrepreneurs, and get rid of some of those #$%^ geese.
 
I suggested to the local grocery store that they should sponsor a goose roundup (retention ponds): people could pay a small fee to catch the geese; local folks could pay to set up booths/tents where they would offer plucking/gutting/cooking services.

This would provide food to people, provide money to local entrepreneurs, and get rid of some of those #$%^ geese.

Great idea--they could use the same system to cull the deer too. And the feathers and leathers would be a secondary market--low-cost pillows and purses for everyone as long as the depression lasts.
 
no pressure on me; i'd need a buyer to put pressure on me. that sailboat is going over the horizon all on it's own. think my best case scenerio now is sell out and vagabond while living very below my means for two years. rebuy a cheapo beach house or apt while i still maintain a homestead advantage just when daytona bottoms out. rent a room to cover costs, travel on the cheap five or 6 months/year for three/four years until the cruising kitty builds up again. that should put me back on my pre-bubble track, you know, that bubble that popped right before the depression hit.

so if the depression hits in five years (i assume it is ok that i'm market timing the depression) i'll collect what i can from the beach house squatters while i'm fishing for preprepared tofu dishes as i sail off the coast of southeast asia. that's my plan and i'm sticking to it.
 
Gold, guns, and freeze dryed food(7 yrs worth).

All these posts and no - Psssst Wellesley! Come on folks get serious - that actually worked for me last time around.

Still have the 10% interest in that patented gold mine in Colorado - we couldn't con er I mean convince the Boy Scouts to buy as a camping area.

The timberland/evil Spotted Owls became vacation plots - the last sold in 2005. I don't think I even kept up with inflation.

Never did buy 7yrs of food but some of the backpackers meals that came out were pretty good.

heh heh heh - :D. To do over again with hindsight - hey psst Wellesley works for me or Wellington in the accumulation phase or balanced index plus a tad commodities(ala PCRIX type), a small dose foreign bond fund if availible.

Of course if you are bad to the bone - 4th edition of Ben Graham's Intelligent Investor was written in 1972 - a tome I never mastered.

One more time - with hindsight Psst Wellesley and putz around the edges. ;).
 
I feel rather foolish asking this but would someone please explain "tin foil hats" for me?
 
I feel rather foolish asking this but would someone please explain "tin foil hats" for me?

Tin foil hat

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A tin foil hat in profile.


A tin foil hat is a piece of headgear made from one or more sheets of tin foil, aluminium foil or similar material. In theory, people wear the hats in the belief that they act to shield the brain from such influences as electromagnetic fields, or against alien interference, mind control and mind reading.
The idea of wearing a tin foil hat for protection from such threats has become a popular stereotype and term of derision. The phrase serves as a byword for paranoia and is often used to characterize conspiracy theorists.




Aluminum Foil Deflector Beanie
 
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