My BS bucket is too heavy

jime444 - I'm sorry that your ER timing is not yours. But if you are only 20 months away you might find that this is a blessing in disguise. Play with Firecalc. If you could work part time or cut an expense that is only 5 or 6k a year it might make a world of difference in your success rates.
 
I think what is happening is that at some level you know that you really do have enough to retire right now.
So one option for you would be might be to question whether the lack of tolerance of BS right now is you really knowing in your heart that you are FI and that you would be happier just going ahead and retiring before the TMY were up.

Yep - I decided to hang in because I was carrying two houses while we waited for the "big house" to sell after we moved out. Well - it sold in 9 days and now I have more solid numbers. I'm at a 3.25% WR, which was the original goal I set. So yes, I could ER and yes, that has definitely shortened my fuse. The BS hasn't changed but my bucket is much smaller now.

I like the idea that a couple of people mentioned of thinking of myself as a temp. I'm going to hang up a "Live And Learn Temporary Agency" sign on my PC. Since I w*rk from home the boss won't see it and perhaps it will help me keep perspective.
 
I feel exactly this same way. I have until Jan 2015. It has gotten a little easier for me as I have started to learn to not care about other people's stupidity but I cant help but still care about the quality of MY work.

Yes, agreed totally. In reality, for several years before my layoff I increasingly became indifferent about the work I was doing, feeling like I wasn't doing anything to make society better. Only my own professional pride in a job well done kept me appearing to give a damn.

jime444 - I'm sorry that your ER timing is not yours. But if you are only 20 months away you might find that this is a blessing in disguise.

This was true for me. I was already probably within a couple years of calling it quits anyway. But Megacorp forcing my hand not only freed me from agonizing over the timing of it, but helped me avoid "one more year" syndrome and gave me six months pay to boot. I know it's not financially feasible for everyone to feel this way, but getting laid off was the best thing that has happened to me since I married my wife. :)
 
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I can sympathize. I got as far as I did because I cared and always tried to make a difference. Problem is that the mega-corp doesn't usually have the same care for you as you (perhaps in your case and perhaps mine) had for it. I know in my case, the organization has gone downhill since I left. They replaced me with a guy who cares pretty much only for himself, and it is all too obvious to the staff. Now that I'm gone, I'd like to say I no longer care, but the reality is that I do, as I see my own legacy being slowly reduced to ash.

R

I'm going to have to eat my words, a little. Just when I thought megacorp had probably forgotten me, my former boss, the CEO of the US$ 22 billion corporation, called me to see how I was doing and wish me a happy birthday. I was shocked, and I needed a shovel to scrape my jaw off the floor. I was one of his best performing region heads, but did not expect him to keep in contact after I retired. In many ways I have always admired him, even though I did need to have a serious discussion with him about some issues before I retired. Needless to say, even though I admired him and had an amicable relationship with him for the most part, we were not what I would call friends or buddies. I was grateful to receive his call, and I thought I detected serious care and concern for "an old member of the megacorp family". Anyway, it was a nice chat.

R
 
I'm going to have to eat my words, a little. Just when I thought megacorp had probably forgotten me, my former boss, the CEO of the US$ 22 billion corporation, called me to see how I was doing and wish me a happy birthday. I was shocked, and I needed a shovel to scrape my jaw off the floor. I was one of his best performing region heads, but did not expect him to keep in contact after I retired. In many ways I have always admired him, even though I did need to have a serious discussion with him about some issues before I retired. Needless to say, even though I admired him and had an amicable relationship with him for the most part, we were not what I would call friends or buddies. I was grateful to receive his call, and I thought I detected serious care and concern for "an old member of the megacorp family". Anyway, it was a nice chat. R

Happy Birthday Rambler!

My guess is that there will be a follow up call to invite you back. CEOs never call anyone for no good reason.
 
Happy Birthday Rambler!

My guess is that there will be a follow up call to invite you back. CEOs never call anyone for no good reason.

Yeah, that's what DW says too. I wouldn't mind doing a little consulting for them, but going back to them full time is no longer an option.

R
 
I am also making full use of vacation and sick days. Find a way to unplug and it really helps. I took today off to go chase deer (and other critters). The cell phone was off all day and I probabluy hiked at least 10 miles with pack and bangstick. I came face to face with a beautiful buck, but I have a doe-only tag. Could have been frustrating, but really I was almost pitifully grateful to be outside, away from the crap, and watching a beautiful creature bound away into the woods.

You are handling it very well.
 
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