Space - The Final Frontier

One thing we all need to keep in mind is that space is still a very dangerous place. Travel, even to LEO is not as "routine" as we've come to expect.

God speed to the crew.
 
My understanding is there were helium leaks in the propulsion system.

Rumor has it that SpaceX will bring the astronauts home, instead of Boeing.

The Dragon capsule will dock, its hatch flung open, and there will be Elon Musk, come to the rescue!

With THC vapes for everyone!
 
Out in space I would think it's humanity against the rest. So if SpaceX need to step in and offer the Starliner crew a lift home both parties would be fine with that.

And it would give Boeing a chance of updating the Starliner without taking too much risk first.
 
Out in space I would think it's humanity against the rest. So if SpaceX need to step in and offer the Starliner crew a lift home both parties would be fine with that.

And it would give Boeing a chance of updating the Starliner without taking too much risk first.
Yes, I think there would be a lot of cooperation where the crew is concerned. Who wouldn't help to keep brave men and women safe.
 
I just saw that Blue Origin is suing to limit the number of SpaceX launches from Florida claiming environmental damage. I guess they better hope they don't need a ride home from the space station.
 
I just saw that Blue Origin is suing to limit the number of SpaceX launches from Florida claiming environmental damage. I guess they better hope they don't need a ride home from the space station.
Blue Origin will first need to develop a manned spacecraft capable of achieving orbit.
 
Yes, I'm sure Blue Origin is deeply concerned about the environment. It has nothing at all to do with trying to tie the hands of the competition. No. They wouldn't do that. Not in Corporate America!

Just like all those waterfront property owners who oppose offshore wind farms. All those poor sea birds! They are so precious! We only want to protect the birds! It's got nothing to do with our view!
 
Space X is going to destroy ISS in 2030. That should be fun viewing. Set a calendar notice :popcorn:
  • NASA will have a spacecraft from Elon Musk’s SpaceX guide the International Space Station’s destruction after its retirement in 2030.
  • The agency awarded an $843 million contract to SpaceX to build the so-called “U.S. Deorbit Vehicle.”
  • The SpaceX-built vehicle will effectively destroy the ISS by pushing the station into reentry from orbit.
 
Space X is going to destroy ISS in 2030. That should be fun viewing. Set a calendar notice :popcorn:
  • NASA will have a spacecraft from Elon Musk’s SpaceX guide the International Space Station’s destruction after its retirement in 2030.
  • The agency awarded an $843 million contract to SpaceX to build the so-called “U.S. Deorbit Vehicle.”
  • The SpaceX-built vehicle will effectively destroy the ISS by pushing the station into reentry from orbit.
Heh, heh, $43 mil for the de-orbit rocket and $800 mil for insurance!??

Hope I'm around for the firew*rks!
 
OOPS!


Emphasis added.

A Chinese rocket being developed by a private company escaped from the launch pad during a static fire attempt and crashed some distance away from the test site. The rocket, Tianlong-3, uses nine kerosene powered engines and is designed to land vertically, similar to SpaceX's Falcon 9. This latest test comes soon after footage from China showed an operational rocket crashing on Earth after successfully launching a satellite. Tianlong-3's manufacturer, Space Pioneer, assured the press in a release that no casualties were reported from the test. China's Tianlong-3 Test Rocket Escapes From Test Pad & Flies Briefly Before Crashing Mishaps […]

SpaceX makes it look easy at times, but space travel is still hard.
 
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Thursday the Falcon 9’s second stage failed a restart and was destroyed. It’s grounded for the duration of the investigation. Apparently there was a leak in the oxygen tank or plumbing.


Another reason for Boeing to get its act together.
 
Thursday the Falcon 9’s second stage failed a restart and was destroyed. It’s grounded for the duration of the investigation. Apparently there was a leak in the oxygen tank or plumbing.


Another reason for Boeing to get its act together.
Better to get the details from the source. (emphasis mine)

"After a planned relight of the upper stage engine to raise perigee – or the lowest point of orbit – the Merlin Vacuum engine experienced an anomaly and was unable to complete its second burn. Although the stage survived and still deployed the satellites, it did not successfully circularize its orbit, but it did passivate itself as normally performed at the end of each mission. This left the satellites in an eccentric orbit with a very low perigee of 135 km, which is less than half the expected perigee altitude.

The team worked overnight to make contact with the satellites in order to send early burn commands, but the satellites were left in an enormously high-drag environment only 135 km above the Earth (each pass through perigee removed 5+ km of altitude from the orbit’s apogee, or the highest point in the satellite orbit). At this level of drag, our maximum available thrust is unlikely to be enough to successfully raise the satellites. As such, the satellites will re-enter Earth’s atmosphere and fully demise. They do not pose a threat to other satellites in orbit or to public safety."

Starlink Mission - SpaceX
 
Thanks, dixonge. I do wonder who writes these things. "Demise" as a verb does not mean what the writer thinks it means, and while "circularize" and "passivate" are not strictly incorrect, they are unusual usages that will be unfamiliar to most readers.
 
Thanks, dixonge. I do wonder who writes these things. "Demise" as a verb does not mean what the writer thinks it means, and while "circularize" and "passivate" are not strictly incorrect, they are unusual usages that will be unfamiliar to most readers.
Demise as a verb seems to be accepted usage for the spacecraft community. For example, from an ESA conference report:
Building a spacecraft such that most of it will demise during the re-entry…
 
Yeah, every "industry" has its own jargon. It makes "sense" after you've gotten used to using it for a while I suppose.
When writing for a general audience, it is best to avoid jargon. The author felt the need to define the words "apogee" and "perigee", so he appears to have understood that he was writing for a general audience. Space industry insiders would not need a definition. Yet he appears to be so immersed in industry jargon that he cannot recognize that it obscures rather than clarifies his message. My inner English teacher gives him a C- for this effort.
 
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