ugh almost ready to give in to panic

wallygator69

Recycles dryer sheets
Joined
Jan 27, 2006
Messages
373
Hey,

Maybe a sign for you guys to buy more.

We are 44 retired almost 2 years, down 4 years living expenses even with pretty conservative allocation from the peak. 40% stock, 40% bond and cash, 20% commodities.

This time it really looks like it maybe different. Too much bad news everywhere. Subprime mess and bailout, oil, inflation, economy, Israel vs Iran, blah blah...

What are you folks ER'd under 50, doing to keep sane and not bail?

Thanks, had the butter knife to my wrists twice today but couldn't go thru with it..

W
 
This time it really looks like it maybe different.

Doesn't it look like that every time there is a big market swing both up or down?

The sooner folks who are susceptible to panic reach the point where they do, the sooner we'll hit bottom and can begin to move on.

>:D Panic away...
 
I'm not in panic mode because I've ridden this wave before but I'm awful reluctant to spend fun money while this is happening .
 
I'm not under 50 but....

Watching CNBC today and many experts were saying not to buy now. But I remember that these were the same experts telling m to buy- buy- buy only a year ago.

So I bought some more today. If it really is different this time I don't have a clue how we get out of it so I'm going to assume that it is just like it always has been - the market goes up and down. Down hurts but there are more ups than downs and they are bigger.
 
The sooner folks who are susceptible to panic reach the point where they do, the sooner we'll hit bottom and can begin to move on.
If that were the case, then the stock and bond markets should have started rebounding a month ago. In the course of two months I've gone from planning an ER at 55 to now working until I'm 60 because I'm obviously not prepared for ER. That should be enough panic to cause the stock market to pop up 10%.

I'm with the OP on this one. There is enough bad news to keep this bear market going for quite some time. And much of the rest of the world doesn't seem to have a problem sticking it to the US this time around.
 
Doesn't it look like that every time there is a big market swing both up or down?

The sooner folks who are susceptible to panic reach the point where they do, the sooner we'll hit bottom and can begin to move on.

>:D Panic away...

I believe there is a lot more to it than that. Major financial institutions are on the verge of collapse. They will have lost almost a trillion dollars when it's all over. I don't ever remember things this bad before, even during the Carter years.
 
If that were the case, then the stock and bond markets should have started rebounding a month ago. In the course of two months I've gone from planning an ER at 55 to now working until I'm 60 because I'm obviously not prepared for ER. That should be enough panic to cause the stock market to pop up 10%.

There are always some who are early adopters...;)
 
W, I share your anxiety about it. I just turned 46, been semi early retired for a few years. Today is hitting me hard because yesterday I saw how much my funds had dropped recently -- I hadn't been following things closely for a few weeks. So yesterday was sobering -- and now what do I call today?:rant:

Then I reminded myself there will be a lot of this in the years to come.

Practically speaking, I set things up so if I had to rely only on income from fund distributions I could meet expenses with some room for fun. That should work for a few years. I also did not include social security or an inheritance in my plans. And I have a second house to sell if I have to.

I think we 40 somethings have a lot in our favor, though obviously many years of possible downturns in our futures.

I might start checking my accounts quarterly in the future.

kate
 
I'm 50 and DH is 54. I've been retired for almost 10 years and he has one more year on the job.

It took a long time for us to finally reach an asset allocation that we can live with. I update our financial spreadsheet once a month and look at the percentages. When we are off about 5% in our allocation, I rebalance.

Reaching our comfort level with our allocation was the key....

...and a shot or two of JD doesn't hurt. ;)
 
Don't worry - Be happy :duh:

You will see plenty of posters here
sing the praises of "buy and hold"

I'm not one of them... I cashed out
quite a while ago.
 
I suspect we are close to a bottom because Dad called out of the blue today and wanted to know if we should sell everything because the market was crashing.
 
Hey,

Maybe a sign for you guys to buy more.

We are 44 retired almost 2 years, down 4 years living expenses even with pretty conservative allocation from the peak. 40% stock, 40% bond and cash, 20% commodities.

This time it really looks like it maybe different. Too much bad news everywhere. Subprime mess and bailout, oil, inflation, economy, Israel vs Iran, blah blah...

What are you folks ER'd under 50, doing to keep sane and not bail?

Thanks, had the butter knife to my wrists twice today but couldn't go thru with it..

W

I am right there with you! ER'd at 52 last year and have seen my funds greatly diminished.....too dumb to listen to the experts here and did not diversify like I should have....so my portfolio (heavy in the financial sector) has lost $450K....yep, you read it right....$450K gone....poof*** - gone...

Oh...and I tried to BUY MORE while stocks have been going down....and I am currently ALL BOUGHT OUT - nothing left to buy with.....and I actually think that's a good thing as I'm sure that I'd buy something else that would head directly south.....

I don't guess that I have to mention my real estate portfolio - hmmm....looks like I have all of the right stuff, huh? It includes an inherited condo that I can't sell or rent that is currently sucking an additional $500 each month out of my ever shrinking retirement funds....

The only way that I have been able to handle it is to LOOK AWAY from it all and try to focus on ANY positive points that I can find.....

Like....I woke up this morning.....I'm healthy and walking 5-10 miles a day....I still have food to eat.....my 15 y/o daughter is an angel.....my dog still loves me....my DW is as beautiful as ever.....
 
Ugh, can't afford panic. Panic in the past always cost me money or pain. Or both.
 
I've reconsidered - we're all doomed. I'm selling everything and moving to Texas. Since everything else has gone to Hell, I might as well too. ;)

My depression era parents, were they still alive, would be laughing at those of us who think these are tough times...
 
Like....I woke up this morning.....I'm healthy and walking 5-10 miles a day....I still have food to eat.....my 15 y/o daughter is an angel.....my dog still loves me....my DW is as beautiful as ever.....

And those things are exactly where your priorities should be. This gloom & doom will eventually pass...
 
I've reconsidered - we're all doomed. I'm selling everything and moving to Texas. Since everything else has gone to Hell, I might as well too. ;)

My depression era parents, were they still alive, would be laughing at those of us who think these are tough times...
We are still living the good life. The tough times are ahead.
 
There have always been reasons for people not to invest in the stock market.

In 1991 people were afraid of investing because we were about to enter into a war with Iraq.

In 1989 people were afraid to invest because of the fear that the government had to bail out the S&Ls.

In 1988 people were afraid after Black Monday.

In 1987 people thought they missed the boat when the Dow hit 2000.

In 1983 people were afraid because unemployment was at 10% and banks were failing.

In 1981 people were skeptical of the future of US businesses when Chrysler needed a $400 million loan to stay in business.

In 1980 people were afraid of a war when Iran was holding US hostages.

In 1977 people were afraid of inflation killing the economy when coffee was at $5 a pound.

In 1976 people were afraid of the stock market when New York City almost went bankrupt.

In 1963 the Dow dropped 4% the day Kennedy was assassinated but recovered all losses on the very next business day.

In 1941 the market dropped 1.72% the first week following Pearl Harbor but recovered in just 5 months.

In every one of those years or any year in between, if you had invested in the stock market, you would be worth a considerable amount more today. Invest for the long-term in the stock market and you will be rewarded.
 
Since I retired last year it's been a steady downward spiral. So I bought more TSM today, that'll show'em.
 
My depression era parents, were they still alive, would be laughing at those of us who think these are tough times...
I don't get it. No one was complaining last year when the market was 20% overvalued. Shouldn't we all be doing the happy dance now that the market is 20% off its peak and heading for undervalued?!?

Just made my spouse's final IRA contribution. Our asset allocations are holding steady, and Berkshire Hathaway is having a blue-light special sale this month.

I'll be surfing...
 
I suspect we are close to a bottom because Dad called out of the blue today and wanted to know if we should sell everything because the market was crashing.

I agree. There is a lot of garbage out there that probably should never have gone public.

But I have been investing a long time, and to me right now a world wide fire sale on blue chips is being held-US, Europe, and Japan. I expect to come out of this with a higher income than I need, mostly made up of strong equities with high profit margins and low to moderate maintenance capital needs and with a long history of frequent dividend increases.

For a long time I have wondered if this would be possible, and it appears that it is.

If you hold solid companies, now is likely not the time to panic

Ha
 
I don't get it. No one was complaining last year when the market was 20% overvalued. Shouldn't we all be doing the happy dance now that the market is 20% off its peak and heading for undervalued?!?

Just made my spouse's final IRA contribution. Our asset allocations are holding steady, and Berkshire Hathaway is having a blue-light special sale this month.

I'll be surfing...


If I had a Cola pension I'd be doing the happy dance. At this point I'm a wall flower.
 
Instead of playing the market - Texas real estate is the answer. Make sure you get the mineral rights.

About 25 years ago I bought 500 arces of prime Texas pasture land. Then about a year or so ago lady luck smiled on this poor devil.

YouTube - Beverly Hillbillies Color Intro

God Bless Us All:angel:
 
Instead of playing the market - Texas real estate is the answer. Make sure you get the mineral rights.

About 25 years ago I bought 500 arces of prime Texas pasture land. Then about a year or so ago lady luck smiled on this poor devil.

YouTube - Beverly Hillbillies Color Intro

God Bless Us All:angel:

Congrats Wags. You on the Barnett shale?

Ha
 
Congrats Wags. You on the Barnett shale?

Ha

Thank you.

I have been thinking about changing my middle name to Buddy Ebsen or J.D. Clampett.

God Bless Us All :angel:
 
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