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Thinkin of retiring next month
Old 06-28-2011, 04:35 PM   #1
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Thinkin of retiring next month

I am gainfully employed at a large aerospace company with great job security. They turned down my voluntary layoff application two years ago, and even created a new position for me recently. But corporate has just announced another voluntary layoff program again. They are offering me a bonus of 6 1/2 months pay to accept a layoff and have stated that they probably will not turn me down again, although they want me to stay. I have a 5 year old son, a 41 year old wife who is going to junior college to find out what she wants to be when she grows up. She sold her business 5 years ago and has not worked since. I am not sure the colledge will help her in the job market with all the space shuttle workers with advanced degrees around here that have just been laid off. I have around $650K in my 401 with most in bonds, mid cap, and foreigh investments. Retirement pay is around 40% of current pay. At 59 it will be 3 years till I can draw SSI. Not sure I should retire now or slug it out for three more years or wait until health forces me out. I am a diabetic and recovered (16 years) alcoholic. No life insurance to speak of with little chance of getting some. I do have health insurance from work but it will be around $1200 a month. I would like some dfferent points of view from retireees out there.
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Old 06-28-2011, 04:43 PM   #2
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One of the critical pieces of information you need to analyze is your expense analysis - both pre and post retirement. I would also suggest you try the FireCalc link at the bottom of this page.

Good luck and welcome!
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Old 06-28-2011, 06:16 PM   #3
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Welcome,

I see that you have a son and a wife that are younger than the norm for a person of your age that appear to completely depend on you financially. You have to plan for that fact and realize some of the traditional rules might not apply in your case as your wife has 20 + years before she can begin to collect SS.

Your health seems to be a factor in this decision.

Don't let the buyout try to influence your decision too heavily. Aerospace jobs with stability are hard to come by.

Are you a candidate for disability?
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Old 06-28-2011, 06:20 PM   #4
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Sounds to me that when you take SS at 62 your child and wife will also be able to collect.
This should give you about 4K a month which should make things a lot easier.
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Old 06-28-2011, 06:53 PM   #5
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Sounds to me that when you take SS at 62 your child and wife will also be able to collect.
This should give you about 4K a month which should make things a lot easier.
Why would the wife and kid get SS? Don't they only get it if he dies?
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Old 06-28-2011, 07:03 PM   #6
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You didn't mention how much 40% of your pay is...we'll assume it's $40k. If you take out the $1200 monthly for insurance (you may want to look into a high-deductible plan for you and the wife...), you are left with $26k.

If you have expenses of $60k, you'll have to draw the additional $34k from $650k for 3 or so years. Once on SS, you should be fine unless you get deathly ill or something.
Unfortunately, your fam is quite young and susceptible to your future health probs. This is a tough one for me to give an opinion...
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Old 06-28-2011, 09:39 PM   #7
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I would recommend you also enter your numbers here : Merrill Edge| See Where You Stand
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Old 06-28-2011, 09:46 PM   #8
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Why would the wife and kid get SS? Don't they only get it if he dies?
It seems that if you are eligible for SS and have a child under 18 the child can receive SS. They then will pay your DW to take care of your child as long as she doesn't make more than 15K a year. I think that # is about right.'

I learned this when my neighbor took his SS at 62 2 years ago. He was amazed that he received SS money for his wife and underage child.

This country is crazy! Make children over the age of 45 and when you become 62 everyone else gets to pay to take care of the spouse and child.

If you're dumb enough to make children over the age of 45 you should take care of them, not your neighbors.
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Old 06-28-2011, 09:59 PM   #9
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I would recommend you also enter your numbers here : Merrill Edge| See Where You Stand
Yeah, and if you're using Merrill make sure to save 50% more so you can afford to pay your advisor.
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Old 06-29-2011, 03:45 AM   #10
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Hello 73ss454 - the online tool is free.
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Originally Posted by 73ss454 View Post
Yeah, and if you're using Merrill make sure to save 50% more so you can afford to pay your advisor.
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Old 06-29-2011, 06:08 AM   #11
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Don't make any decisions until you have created a comprehensive financial plan!


If you need to make a decision in the near-term (soon) and do not have the back ground to do it (i.e., educate yourself on the topic)... You may need some help.

Does your Mega Corp provide you with access to a financial planner as a company benefit?

If not, you might consider finding a fee based financial planner for some advice and to help you. Make sure you do your due diligence effort in selecting a financial planner. As you know from your professional experience (in your job) there is a range if skills, knowledge, and capability. You want to ensure that you selected the most capable (and honest) person available to you... yes, as in all fields, there are some number of incompetent to mediocre people in it... and a few dishonest ones!
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Old 06-29-2011, 07:18 AM   #12
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I'm not a retiree, yet. But as you are apparently doing,you should think long and hard about retiring now. With a non-working (i.e., no earnings currently coming in) spouse, a young child, and your health issues it would appear you need more than $650,000, and I say that without even knowing your current annual expenses.
Children are expensive to raise, and especially in your case you need to consider your health and how that might impact family finances.
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Old 06-29-2011, 07:33 AM   #13
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Don't make any decisions until you have created a comprehensive financial plan!
I agree.

Also, it might be a good idea to "measure yourself" (physiologically speaking) to see if your "number" will tempt you (or more specifically your young family) to just "have fun" in the early years of your retirement.

I only bring this up due to discussions I've had recently with my DW, concerning folks she are aware of who did not participate (other than have a 401(k) plan at work, with little knowledge of investing) who, upon retirement, saw this "pot of money" - for the first time available to them, and often the largest single asset, to be used for "immediate needs", in the first few years of retirement.

For many folks who approach retirement as a long-term exercise in money/investment management (rather than have it done "on automatic") the temptation to spend in the early years of retirement are great; especially when you have this "pent up desire" of not only having the freedom to do what you want, but also have a bit of money to live out your dreams. I believe this is especially a consideration since you have a young family, which may have desires/needs differenent than a typical "old couple" (such as DW/me ) are, and have fulfilled many of our desires along the way, as we grew older.

There are financial and physiological attributes to be considered in retirement, regardless of your age. Both are important to your (and your families) ongoing success - when you no longer have a paycheck.

Good luck to you.
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