Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-13-2012, 01:33 PM   #21
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 265
I have some revere ware that is 37 years old and I still use it daily. Also, that can opener looks very familiar. I am looking for a recommendation for an easy-to-use, manual corkscrew. The one I have was very cheap and it doesn't work well.
__________________

__________________
FIYes is online now   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-13-2012, 01:58 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Indialantic FL
Posts: 1,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxfirev5 View Post
My wife bought our cast iron frying pans for $5 in 1976. We use them nearly every day. Best ROI of anything in our kitchen.
love our cast iron too. Nothing purchased retail, all from yard sales.
__________________

__________________
JimnJana
"The four most dangerous words in investing are 'This time it's different.'" - Sir John Templeton
jimnjana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 02:50 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
David1961's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,076
I'm generally very frugal, but in areas relating to health and safety, I loosen up. I have regular doctor's appointments, have regular blood work, etc. done. I will spend a little more and buy healthier foods than the absolute cheapest food. I figure an investment in my health will be worth it. Also, I don't skimp on tires or brakes for the car. Also, when it comes to air conditioning or heating, I will spend the extra if it makes me comfortable.
__________________
David1961 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 05:08 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
I look for Revere Ware, Pyrex and Corning Ware in the thrift shops. ISTM I remember that some of these well-regarded brands have in the last decade or so removed their manufacturing from the US to China and/or changed formulation, so what you get now is no longer the same thing you got when buying the same brand fifteen or twenty years ago.

I don't know whether any small kitchen appliances are manufactured to last any more. My mom still has the electric mixer she got as a wedding present in 1949, and other than replacing the cord a few years ago, it is all original and still works great. It isn't used that frequently, but it wouldn't surprise me at all if it lasts another generation. I have an almost equally aged upright vacuum that was given me as a gift some years back, and though it weighs a ton, it still works fine. Maybe household appliances are no longer made so they last half a century or more, because nobody expects the marriages to last that long.

My contribution to this thread from my own experience: if you buy a trap snake (for clearing toilet clogs) get one where the spring-like part that goes down the drain is nice and thick--approaching half an inch or maybe more. I got a little skinny one maybe 5/16 or 3/8" diameter and after a few years, the spring kinked and the snake was no longer usable. I don't have a long plumber's snake for clearing obstructions further down the drain, but I would imagine "thicker is better" would be good advice for those as well.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 05:33 PM   #25
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
freebird5825's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: East Nowhere, 43N Latitude, NY
Posts: 9,017
I have a short list of things I never skimp on...

Tools of all types
Lawn equipment
Kitchen equipment and pots/pans
Mattress and pillow
Winter gloves and boots
Bath towels
Mayonnaise
Coffee
Real butter
Seafood including canned tuna
Cheese...I am lucky to have excellent NYS locally manufactured cheese at outlets and all grocery stores. An example here http://colossecheesestore.com/Retail.aspx
Maple syrup http://adirondackstughill.com/histor...e_syrup%20.php
BACON (I buy it at mom-n-pop butcher shops)
Envelopes with security liner and peel and press adhesive strip
Real vintage stockings (via eBay), not cheaply made pantyhose..gotta keep Mr B smiling...
__________________
"All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." - Walt Disney
freebird5825 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 07:19 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
Quote:
My contribution to this thread from my own experience: if you buy a trap snake (for clearing toilet clogs) get one where the spring-like part that goes down the drain is nice and thick--approaching half an inch or maybe more. I got a little skinny one maybe 5/16 or 3/8" diameter and after a few years, the spring kinked and the snake was no longer usable. I don't have a long plumber's snake for clearing obstructions further down the drain, but I would imagine "thicker is better" would be good advice for those as well.

Oh yeah!... I forgot... a MUST.
@ $100/visit from the plumber, that $24.95 for a top of the line snake looks awfully good when the grandkids flush a dishcloth town the toilet.
The thicker 50 ft. snake is best, especially for those homes with "iffy" drains.
__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 09:14 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Indialantic FL
Posts: 1,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post

I don't know whether any small kitchen appliances are manufactured to last any more. .
Most are not. Our VITAMIX is built to last. Our kitchen aide stand mixer is as well. Every other small appliance in our kitchen is something we bought at a yard sale. When they die, we find a replacement or in the case of coffee makers we keep a spare in the garage.
__________________
JimnJana
"The four most dangerous words in investing are 'This time it's different.'" - Sir John Templeton
jimnjana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 09:32 PM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,471
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrayHare View Post
My general rule is the more often you use an item, be it a pot, a hammer, a TV, a deck, whatever, the greater the emphasis you should put on quality. Yes, it will cost more than the cheap alternative, but if selected wisely quality will pay for itself in enjoyment and/or durability.
Yep, definitely. We spend money on good quality items that we will use frequently for years and that we can expect to last for decades. And beyond that, we don't buy much stuff! It's a real pleasure cooking when you are using good quality utensils. I know when I go to my Dad's house and cook there it's so frustrating using crappy knives and pots and stovetop. It's such a relief to get back to my kitchen.

We're sticklers for good quality groceries too. It's expensive, but it's a priority and budgeted for. Well, Costco helps (keep the cost down), and even Amazon for some items.
__________________
Well, I thought I was retired. But it seems that now I'm working as a travel agent instead!
audreyh1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 09:49 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,471
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIYes View Post
I have some revere ware that is 37 years old and I still use it daily. Also, that can opener looks very familiar. I am looking for a recommendation for an easy-to-use, manual corkscrew. The one I have was very cheap and it doesn't work well.
Those double-hinged waiter's corkscrews work very well. I've used many but always go back to it. Nice and small too. Pulltap's Double-Hinged Waiter's Corkscrew, $7?
__________________
Well, I thought I was retired. But it seems that now I'm working as a travel agent instead!
audreyh1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 08:52 AM   #30
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 265
AudreyH ...thanks for the recommendation. My dollar tree corkscrew has chewed up the cork onlast two bottles of wine that I have opened
__________________
FIYes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 08:52 AM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
One thing I've found, as an amateur woodworker, is that sometimes the cheapy tools are okay, but only if they'll get light use. While installing radiating barrier in my attic, I overshot the duty cycle of my el-cheapo B&D staple gun, and the coil/solenoid got hot enough to melt the plastic it was mounted on, just enough so that it "jiggled" around within the housing, and therefore could not apply maximum force to drive the staple.

I have bought and used some Harbor Freight stuff, and it's adequate for occasional use, but accounting for duty cycle, and for precision needed, sometimes it's better to spend more. I certainly wouldn't buy HF or consumer-grade tools if I was a contractor...

I have an iron skillet and griddle I bought at WM that I'll probably hand down to my heir, but I also bought a brand-spanking new 12" Lodge skillet off the clearance rack at Cost-Plus for $19.95. Made in America, and also likely to outlast me, and maybe my son.

Bought a mid-priced SS cookwear set from WM, which worked reasonably well when I had an electric range, but it doesn't work as well on the gas range, so will likely replace at some point. Have another PTFE-coated set I bought at Target years ago that is much better at heat transfer, but I really don't like using Teflon.

Don't spend that much on clothing, and use Kohl's 15-20% coupons, which I seemingly get once every week or two, for that. As long as I don't "outgrow" my pants, I keep jeans and jean/cargo shorts for years...

I've been buying more "American-made" stuff, which does usually cost more, but I figure it's an investment in keeping a neighbor employed rather than depending on the dole... Any extra cost works itself out, since I'm not your "average" consumer. There are companies that make jeans in the USA, and the aforementioned Lodge cookware is made here as well.

I once bought a Proctor-Silex drip coffee maker for $8, and used it for maybe ten years before it bought the farm. Doubt Proctor-Silex is anything but another name for "cheap Chinese crap" these days, but around my house the coffee maker gets a workout!
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 09:26 AM   #32
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
For those who prefer to buy American and who live in the Midwest, keep an eye open for the frequent "Made in America" sales at Menards home improvement stores. The inserts are in the Sunday paper or can be found online, seems like they do it a few times per year. There are still a wide variety of products made here, and many compete well on price and quality with foreign products. FWIW, I find the selection and prices at Menards to be better than HD or Lowes, and their lumber is better.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 12:34 PM   #33
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
For those who prefer to buy American and who live in the Midwest, keep an eye open for the frequent "Made in America" sales at Menards home improvement stores. The inserts are in the Sunday paper or can be found online, seems like they do it a few times per year. There are still a wide variety of products made here, and many compete well on price and quality with foreign products. FWIW, I find the selection and prices at Menards to be better than HD or Lowes, and their lumber is better.
That wouldn't be difficult; unfortunately, the nearest Menard's is in Wichita, KS...
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 10:37 PM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: North of Montana
Posts: 2,753
Why buy 'things' that may last 50 years unless you know how long the owner will last?
__________________
There are two kinds of people in the world: those who can extrapolate conclusions from insufficient data and ..
kumquat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2012, 12:36 AM   #35
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by kumquat View Post
Why buy 'things' that may last 50 years unless you know how long the owner will last?
Oh, that's an easy answer: to burden your adult children with them!
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2012, 07:53 AM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,038
When you get old enough, buying green bananas may be a long shot.
__________________
In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not.
Lazarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2012, 08:08 AM   #37
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,976
Quote:
Originally Posted by frayne View Post
I have always been a proponent of buying quality and keeping things until they are completely used up.
Me too. I am interested in the best value over the life of the item, something reliable of used often, not always the cheapest. And I would add try to avoid buying anything we don't absolutely need (can I make do with something else, or borrow/barter for use of what I need) and try to buy items that serve more than one purpose (ie, no one needs a bagel slicer, flour sifter when a strainer works great, toaster when a toaster oven is more versatile, etc.)
__________________

__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:45 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.