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Old 03-26-2016, 12:00 PM   #21
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Based on earlier research at repairclinic.com, I had already ordered a pump & motor assembly (cost $117.64) and it arrived a few days ago.

Luckily for me, this assembly includes a new washer and a new diverter valve which would have cost $5.55 and $77.80 respectively. Also included as part of this assembly is a new pump (part cost separately $129.95 ) and the complete plastic sump base (part cost separately $54.15) which includes the gasket (which provides the seal at the 'floor' of the dishwasher) that is molded right into the upper edge, along with the three tabs that hold it in place.

BTW, this sealing gasket at the floor of the dishwasher (which we suspected earlier as possibly having dried-out and started leaking is not available as a separate part as it is integral to the sump assembly). My inspection of the old sealing gasket indicates that it seems to be flexible and not cracked/dried out. And as I was inspecting things underneath the dishwasher, I could see a little evidence of prior leakage, but it seems to have stopped.

Next step, install this assembly and see what happens.

omni
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Old 03-26-2016, 12:18 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
Based on earlier research at repairclinic.com, I had already ordered a pump & motor assembly (cost $117.64) and it arrived a few days ago.

Luckily for me, this assembly includes a new washer and a new diverter valve which would have cost $5.55 and $77.80 respectively. So for the extra bucks, I'll also have a new pump (part cost $129.95 ).
Good detective work at finding the torn gasket. This is shaping up to be a worthwhile project--you would have paid a lot more than this to have somebody come look at it and do the swaps. The big challenge if I were in your boots is being able to >find< the pump I removed if I ever needed it again. My technique: Put it in some spot on a garage shelf, leave a note >inside the dishwasher< saying where it is. Then hope I don't move it/throw it out while cleaning up.

Or just repurpose the old pump. A spa? A water feature?
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Old 03-26-2016, 12:33 PM   #23
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Good detective work at finding the torn gasket. This is shaping up to be a worthwhile project--you would have paid a lot more than this to have somebody come look at it and do the swaps. The big challenge if I were in your boots is being able to >find< the pump I removed if I ever needed it again. My technique: Put it in some spot on a garage shelf, leave a note >inside the dishwasher< saying where it is. Then hope I don't move it/throw it out while cleaning up.

Or just repurpose the old pump. A spa? A water feature?
Thanks.

I didn't make myself very clear. I am planning on installing the entire (new) assembly...which includes the new pump (I figured it came as part of the replacement part assembly, so I might as well use it.)

In the interests of not hoarding keeping my life simple and uncluttered, I plan to dispose of all of the old parts as soon as I confirm that the leaking has stopped.

omni
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Old 03-26-2016, 12:45 PM   #24
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....In the interests of not hoarding keeping my life simple and uncluttered, I plan to dispose of all of the old parts as soon as I confirm that the leaking has stopped.omni
Good plan, something I should have started doing years ago....
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How to remove corrosion on a CONNECTOR?
Old 03-26-2016, 02:23 PM   #25
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How to remove corrosion on a CONNECTOR?

In the process of reassembling everything, I noticed that there's a lot of corrosion on the electrical connector that was attached to the circuit board on the base of the diverter valve. This is the general area where the water was leaking, so this corrosion developed over time.

I am attaching a photo of the OLD diverter valve circuit board to give you an idea of the level of corrosion. (BTW, there is a completely new diverter valve on the assembly that I am installing, so this is just to demonstrate the level of corrosion.)

I am hoping to reuse the old electrical connector. (As it is small and convoluted, the corrosion is difficult to see....which is why I am not attaching a photo of it.)

I tried mechanically scraping the connector with a knife, hoping to expose some clean metal to make a good contact.

My concerns are twofold -- 1) will this scraping expose enough metal in the connector to make a good contact when I reassemble things? and 2) will that electrical contact remain over time, or will the remaining bits of corrosion on the connector keep corroding and eventually break the contact?

Is there some way to clean the corrosion off the CONNECTOR easily? I saw a video online where they used 2 solutions: one is a super-saturated table salt & vinegar solution to remove the oxidation/corrosion, followed by a baking soda & water solution to neutralize everything from the first solution. Does this work? or Am I better served by doing something else to get rid of the corrosion short- and long-term(and what would that be)?

omni
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File Type: jpg diverter valve circuit board 2.jpg (129.1 KB, 4 views)
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Old 03-26-2016, 03:54 PM   #26
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.............
Is there some way to clean the corrosion off the CONNECTOR easily? I saw a video online where they used 2 solutions: one is a super-saturated table salt & vinegar solution to remove the oxidation/corrosion, followed by a baking soda & water solution to neutralize everything from the first solution. Does this work? or Am I better served by doing something else to get rid of the corrosion short- and long-term(and what would that be)?

omni
Muriatic acid works fast, but you need to quickly rinse it off before the terminal disappears.
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What I learned.....
Old 03-26-2016, 05:27 PM   #27
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What I learned.....

Looks like the 2-solution process is working on the corrosion on the electrical connector.

It looks like the corrosion mostly gone after sitting in solution 1 (table salt and vinegar) for about 45 minutes (interspersed with gentle brushing with an old toothbrush).

I'll give it a bit more time to soak to make sure it's 100% corrosion-free and then dip it in solution 2 (baking soda and water) to neutralize solution 1.

omni
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The dishwasher is working!
Old 03-26-2016, 08:46 PM   #28
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The dishwasher is working!

After cleaning the corrosion (using the 2-solution process and a toothbrush) off the connector, I reassembled the dishwasher and just ran it thru its short cycle (1-hour).

Everything looks and sounds good. There's no evidence of any water beneath the unit.

While I was at it, I did install Amazon's #1-selling water sensor and alarm. I placed the detachable (wired) sensor unit strategically positioned beneath the diverter valve.
Glentronics, Inc. BWD-HWA Basement Watchdog Water Sensor and Alarm - Household Alarms And Detectors - Amazon.com

Thanks, again, everyone for all your ideas, support, and encouragement.

This was an interesting learning experience. And having a functioning dishwasher as the end result was a great outcome. Yay!

(And whoever at Whirlpool designed that crappy grommet-washer/diverter valve location and interface needs to go back to the drawing board. I hate to think how many similar dishwashers (which cost ~$500-$800 new, plus installation) have been relegated to the trash heap after only 3-4 years of service due to this same water leak (for a grommet-washer part costing $5.50!) Whirlpool, Kenmore, JennAir, KitchenAid and IKEA were the names I saw in the repair forums that seemed to share the same leaking faulty grommet-washer issue. )

omni
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Old 03-26-2016, 09:12 PM   #29
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Excellent news, Omni! Dishwashers can be strange beasts to diagnose sometimes, but it sounds like you have it fixed.


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