Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-28-2015, 01:47 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,582
I get anywhere from 50-70K on my tires. When the originals get in that range (2-3 years for me) I replace them with Michelins.
__________________

__________________
braumeister is online now   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-28-2015, 02:02 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
JoeWras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,513
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunningBum View Post
I put a little less on my Miata. It was riding pretty rough and I asked my mechanic about it. I think the tires were 7-8 years old and he said to replace them, and if that didn't work we'd look at the alignment and other things. New tires fixed it. I also agree about the blowout risk.
Right. Old tires have issues. The compound gets hard (bad for winter especially), the structure gets wonky (you get a bad ride), and there is the blowout risk from just drying out and rotting.

Tread life is another matter because it is hard to compare depending on the amount of city vs highway driving. Some people can get 70k if it is a lot on the highway.

One other thing: I always replace all 4. I think replacing only 2 of the 4 is asking for trouble since it upsets the handling.
__________________

__________________
JoeWras is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 02:06 PM   #23
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 731
The media just had a story on tire age and tire recalls on the CBS and NBC nightly news.


The NTSB declared the current industry method of issuing tire recalls 'broken'.


Several cases of tire stores selling tires over 6 years old and that several deadly accidents were due to 'old' tires (again over 6 years old).


It did not matter if the car was only occasionally used and garages - the tires still become a risk with age.
__________________
BBQ-Nut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 02:40 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Car-Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Citizen of Texas
Posts: 2,465
Depends a lot of the brand/type of tires, vehicle and driving styles. For me, I'm probably harder on tires than most. Also, I won't keep a set of tires that's older than 5 years old and I replace them well before the ware bars are even with the tread. With that said, even with some of the best tires (Michelin's or Pirellie's) the best I get is 40k miles. Usually it's closer to 30k miles.

Example, when I would run Goodyear's on my Corvette, I would "need" to change them in 12 to 15k miles. However, if I would put the equivalent Michelin's on the same car I could easily get 30k+ miles.
__________________
Car-Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 02:42 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
JoeWras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,513
Hey Car-Guy, most car guys I know are lucky to get 20k. That's just one of the "joys" of being a car guy!
__________________
JoeWras is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 02:52 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,988
I got 66,000 miles on my Original Equipment Michelins. I replaced them with the exact same tires, as they seem to ride and handle well on my vehicle, a 2006 Toyota Highlander.

omni
__________________
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 02:54 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,056
Sportier cars usually have "stickier" tires that wear out quicker. Plus, sportier cars are intended to be driven a bit more, well, sportily, so I guess it would make sense the tires would wear out quicker.

FWIW, my old Intrepid had Goodyear Eagle GAs with a 300 treadwear rating. I think they were a bit on the "sticky" side. I hated the fact that I wore them down to racing slicks in less than a year though, although in retrospect, I did deliver pizzas as a second job in those days, which is why I hit 30K miles in about 11 months. And, that was somewhat spirited driving.

I replaced them with some fairly cheap tires called Continental something or other. They were a bit harder, with a 460 treadwear rating. I thought it was interesting that the 300 treadwear rating tires made it 30K miles, and the 460 rating tires made it about 46K miles. The next set of tires were a Yokohama Avid something or other, and its treadwear rating was somewhere in the 620 range I think. So I extrapolated and figured I might get around 62K or so out of them. But, they went in a random fashion starting at around 130K miles (54K on the tires). There was a blowout, one got stolen in a parking garage, and then I finally replaced the other two. I'd have to check my records to see at what mileage the last two were replaced at.
__________________
Andre1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 03:16 PM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
mn54's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: mpls, mn
Posts: 440
The OEM tires I had on my '04 camry lasted 30K miles. Replaced with michelins that lasted 90K. Just replaced those last month. I always buy my tires from a tire specialty retailer, discount tires, because they go through so many tires, you won't get some tires that have been sitting on the shelf for a few years. Plus free lifetime rotation and repair.
__________________
mn54 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 03:17 PM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
frayne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: 19th Hole
Posts: 2,527
Living in the south and pretty much no snow or ice or severe driving conditions usually get around 60K on a set of tires. On my motorcycle around 6K. Riding on two wheels as opposed to four makes a world of difference.
__________________
A totally unblemished life is only for saints.
frayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 03:25 PM   #30
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,612
When "good" about maintaining alignment and proper inflation, I usually got 50-60K out of a set that is rated for at least 60-65K. After that point either the inflation or the alignment was just enough out of whack that at least 2 of them needed to be replaced, and since all were nearing end of life, might as well replace all 4 (with a wheel alignment) at that point.

But now, I only drive about 6-7K miles a year, and since I don't like driving on really old tires, I really don't need tires rated for much more than 50,000 miles.

Brakes, on the other hand.... I have a 2005 Toyota Matrix which just hit 90K miles. Most of them are highway miles and the place where I just replaced my tires and had the state inspection in August said my *original* brakes were still in good shape and had close to 40% of their life left. That's one good thing about life in the boonies; most of your driving is highway miles so your brakes can easily last 100K miles or more.
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 03:27 PM   #31
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
I don't want to take even the slightest risk with my tires, though. I agree completely with JoeWras about that.
Exactly. Those few square inches of tire contact "patch" as it's sometimes called is what you're riding on.

On the 2003 GMC 4WD pickup I got ~60k miles on the OEM tires (Bridgstones, I think) and at 95k miles the second set is still good. The Honda Accord has only 30k miles on it and the original tires are still good. We had a nail in the sidewall of one and that can't be repaired so replaced the tire.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 03:32 PM   #32
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,065
While getting new batteries for my truck last week at WallyWorld I was looking at a group of tires marked for sale at 50% off. Several of them had three digit date codes - meaning they were manufactured prior to January of 2000. Yikes. How to Find Out How Old Your Tires Are

The hot and dry weather around here is rough on tires. I replace all of my auto/truck/RV tires once they reach their sixth birthday. Most have a lot of tread left on them.
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 03:41 PM   #33
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
While getting new batteries for my truck last week at WallyWorld I was looking at a group of tires marked for sale at 50% off. Several of them had three digit date codes - meaning they were manufactured prior to January of 2000. Yikes.
Yikes indeed! I wonder if their legal staff has a clue as to what the liability is putting those out on the shelf?

Any attorney with at least a double-digit IQ could win a lawsuit from one of those tires failing.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 03:44 PM   #34
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
Yikes indeed! I wonder if their legal staff has a clue as to what the liability is putting those out on the shelf?

Any attorney with at least a double-digit IQ could win a lawsuit from one of those tires failing.
Everyone should go check the date code on your tires now to see when they were made.

It is typically a 4 digit 'code'. Eg 4105 which decodes to made 41st week of 2005.
__________________
BBQ-Nut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 03:57 PM   #35
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
While getting new batteries for my truck last week at WallyWorld I was looking at a group of tires marked for sale at 50% off. Several of them had three digit date codes - meaning they were manufactured prior to January of 2000. Yikes. How to Find Out How Old Your Tires Are

The hot and dry weather around here is rough on tires. I replace all of my auto/truck/RV tires once they reach their sixth birthday. Most have a lot of tread left on them.
No doubt they were carefully stored in a facility with temperature and humidity control.

Seriously, I'd never heard of a 6 year lifespan for tires, and when it comes from this thrifty bunch there must be something to it.
__________________
MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 04:11 PM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
38Chevy454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 1,577
As REWahoo pointed out, you can read the date code on your tires to determine date of mfr. Thereis also a tread wear number that indicates the approx softor hardness of the tread. Higher number is longer lasting. In general, the more sport-oriented the tire, the lower the number and the less miles they will go before tread depth gets low.

A lot also depends on the roads you drive on, the load on the tires vs the weight capacity of the tire, and temps.
__________________
After Monday & Tuesday even the calendar says, W-T-F...

Semi-Retired 7/1/16: working part-time (60%) for now [4/24/16 changed to 80%]
Retired Aug 2, 2017; age 53
38Chevy454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 04:15 PM   #37
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,065
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
No doubt they were carefully stored in a facility with temperature and humidity control.
Yep. Stored in a #2 mayonnaise jar on Funk & Wagnalls' back porch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Seriously, I'd never heard of a 6 year lifespan for tires, and when it comes from this thrifty bunch there must be something to it.
From the How to Find Out How Old Your Tires Are article I linked in my previous post (my bold):

Quote:
As a precaution, the Department of Transportation recommends changing even new-looking tires once they hit 10 years old, and many manufacturers recommend swapping them out at six years old. Of course, this aging is highly dependent on where the tires live. Tires in hot dry climates have much shorter lives than those in moderate, moist climates.
This is no country for old men tires.
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 04:15 PM   #38
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Seriously, I'd never heard of a 6 year lifespan for tires, and when it comes from this thrifty bunch there must be something to it.
It's not a hard and fast rule but can vary depending on exposure to the elements.

If you "garage" the car outside where there are long, hot and dry summers, I wouldn't even trust 6 years. In the direct hot sun, tires can dry out and crack sooner than that. Elsewhere it wouldn't surprise me if you could make it 10 years. Still, tires aren't the type of thing you mess with if there is *any* doubt. They are, in some very literal sense, your "lifeline" while driving.
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 05:22 PM   #39
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,822
OK, after reading this thread, checking the internet, and especially talking it over with Frank, we're headed for the tire place tomorrow to see about replacing my tires.


Although it is not as dry here in the summer as it is in Texas, still it does get very hot and I parked outside 100% of the time until a couple of months ago.

Oh man, it's going to cost a lot. I'm almost tempted to trade in the Venza on a new car instead.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2015, 05:22 PM   #40
Recycles dryer sheets
DFA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 311
Well, on pickup, about 60K, on the Mini about, 36K, on retirement car 8k; 2014 Camaro ZL1, 600HP, Supercharged.
__________________

__________________
DFA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
November I Bond rate set with a .2% fixed composite set at 1.38% Mulligan FIRE and Money 1 11-10-2013 05:02 PM
So how many miles a week are you running now? newguy88 Health and Early Retirement 256 04-28-2010 06:38 AM
How many miles on your cars? thefed Other topics 52 11-25-2008 12:12 PM
Used Cars- How old and how many miles? RedHawk Other topics 36 11-12-2007 03:53 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:39 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.