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Old 02-06-2016, 11:57 AM   #41
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Re-cutting the opening is an inviting option, but I'm not sure how messy it can get or how expensive it might be. Above the oven is a cabinet, below is a drawer. The drawer has plenty of height to "give away". Between the drawer and the oven above is a shelf of some sort, thickness unknown. That shelf would need to be cut out or removed, and a new one put in about 3 to 4 inches lower. The drawer itself would need a smaller front, the challenge would be to match the formica.
I had built some new cabinets to replace an island that just wasn't working out in our kitchen with a slide-out pantry, extra cabinets, and breakfast bar. When it came to matching the cabinet doors/drawers of the existing cabinets I was able to find those online to purchase directly from a manufacturer. Ours were stained to match, but it should be possible to match a formica cabinet face too. For our project I built the cabinets but had a local cabinet maker take care of the counter-top ordering and installation. I felt their price was pretty reasonable for that, and I'm pretty much a DIY cheapskate. If you contact some local cabinetmakers and ask them to quote doing the modifications, even if they don't work out chances are you might learn some good ideas from their perspective on it based on the existing cabinet structure. My thought is reworking the space below would be preferable to keep the working height of the oven more comfortable.
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Old 02-06-2016, 05:11 PM   #42
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You are entirely missing out on the opportunity of using this as an excuse to tear out the cabinets and put in new cabinets which will allow you to also put in new counters and a new backsplash and all new appliances while you are at it.

Of course, I equally approve of the option to just buy a new house....

In all seriousness, I wanted to replace my gas cooktop with an induction cooktop. The counter was odd shaped and when I looked at it closely the clearances made it difficult (and perhaps impossible) to put in the new cooktop. So we needed new cabinets, which would mean new counters. By the time we worked through the options we had an entire kitchen remodel planned. (We won't actually do it because we plan to downsize even more in a few years so it doesn't make sense to do a complete remodel here.)
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Old 02-07-2016, 02:04 PM   #43
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To all those that suggested a new kitchen, thanks, but no thanks. That is not the way to get invited to my next cookout, either.

Repairing the ovens isn't practical. The coating (enamel, porcelain?) is flaking off inside one. There is a cloth / asbestos gasket that runs around each door, and both are badly frayed and burned. The lower oven does not heat well.

I stopped by Lowes this morning. They are interested in selling the new appliance but not the cabinet work. Tomorrow I'll start looking at craigslist for kitchen / woodwork folks.
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Old 02-07-2016, 03:04 PM   #44
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Do you use the drawer under the ovens? If not, leave open with no drawer front and use for storing a short step stool or use a basket or decorative box in the opening for storing bake ware.
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Old 02-16-2016, 07:31 AM   #45
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What was the outcome?
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Old 02-16-2016, 07:36 AM   #46
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None yet. The plan is to remove the old oven, widen the cutout, relocate the outlet, then put in a new oven. Looking for a way to do that without spending megabucks.
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Old 02-16-2016, 02:40 PM   #47
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I agree with posts 10, 11, 23, & 32. Did this back in 1993 (bummer that wife's father died right in the middle of the project and it ended up stretching out about 10 days to get finished). If you trim the cabinet doors at the top and move them up, no worry about having to move the handles. Also, by leaving the bottom section alone, you won't have to worry about hurting the integrity of the oven, knowing it will have a solid base to sit on since the base has always supported the other oven.
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Old 02-16-2016, 05:19 PM   #48
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I agree with posts 10, 11, 23, & 32. Did this back in 1993 (bummer that wife's father died right in the middle of the project and it ended up stretching out about 10 days to get finished). If you trim the cabinet doors at the top and move them up, no worry about having to move the handles. Also, by leaving the bottom section alone, you won't have to worry about hurting the integrity of the oven, knowing it will have a solid base to sit on since the base has always supported the other oven.
I thought so too, until MichaelB mentioned his wife's height, then I remembered the difficulty that my friend has with her oven being to high.
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Old 02-16-2016, 05:30 PM   #49
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But either way the oven is going to be within 1 1/8" or so of where it has always been so I doubt that his DW will notice 1 1/8"....
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Old 02-16-2016, 05:36 PM   #50
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But either way the oven is going to be within 1 1/8" or so of where it has always been so I doubt that his DW will notice 1 1/8"....
You wanna bet?
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Old 02-16-2016, 05:39 PM   #51
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Would you care to elaborate on that?
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Old 02-16-2016, 05:45 PM   #52
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Would you care to elaborate on that?
Well, now that you asked, this

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I thought so too, until MichaelB mentioned his wife's height, then I remembered the difficulty that my friend has with her oven being to high.
We need to get someone here who can look at the installation and compare the options of cutting up or down. Then we can make a choice. The current oven is already high for her, so I assume we'll cut low, but both options are still open.
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Old 02-16-2016, 05:50 PM   #53
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Whew!
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Old 02-16-2016, 07:20 PM   #54
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I just did an oven replacement like what you're doing. My situation involved a 1963 double electric oven electric connected on the bottom to a single oven connected on the top. I had to adjust the cabinet wall from 24" to 27" wide. Based on what I had, the wall cabinet had extra space on the bottom to accommodate the electric wire whip with is about 1" thick, and was hard wired into my appliance. I ran the whip to a new junction box on the back wall and the new oven had it's own wire whip that I connected to the box. Worked out well for me and should apply to your situation. I would recommend looking at taking space from the bottom as you have a filler strip and lowering the support cleats to holds the oven weight. If there is space, then no cabinet face mods needed. Otherwise, you have dead space below the bottom cabinet which you can take if needed, you could leave the cabinet face alone but it would be lower than the cabinet connect to it. Or you could trim the bottom of the cabinet face (using a router or sander?), but tape the area first to avoid any chip outs. Most people rarely ever look down this low to notice any small flaws.
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:30 PM   #55
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I also did an oven/microwave replacement that required cabinet work. The home was custom built for the previous very tall husband and wife. The built-in microwave above the oven was so tall, I had to use a step stool to reach it! When I was admiring a new Kitchenaid combination oven/microwave unit at Sears, I was referred to a contractor who could do the cabinet modifications to bring the height down to a more user-friendly level. He came to our house, proposed what he could do, and gave a reasonable estimate.

Alas, when he tried removing the existing oven and microwave, he failed to notice that the units were not attached to each other, and the microwave began sliding off as he was removing the oven. He managed to catch the slippery microwave before it crashed to the wood floor, but not without gouging the custom oak framework in 3 places on the adjacent doorway. He apologized, and said he would repair the damage.

He completed the interior cabinet work and installed the new combination oven and microwave. He then said he would return to fix the damaged oak frame. He never did return, and he never mailed us a bill for the significant amount of work he did. I guess he decided it was a wash.

Our luck returned when we discovered our neighbor was a retired woodworking teacher. He proposed making new cabinet doors above our now lowered appliance that perfectly matched the style and wood stain of the surrounding cabinets, and he repaired the oak frame. He quoted us a fair price, and the work was absolutely professional. I could not have been more pleased with the work.
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Old 02-23-2016, 09:46 AM   #56
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In a similar position, we went for the new kitchen. I wish I had done it 10 years earlier. I always hated the original builder cabinets.


It was definitely a budget buster, though.
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