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Old 01-04-2014, 03:53 PM   #161
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You mean this talk?

http://www.tedxchapmanu.com/2013-talks/#Shotwell

Click on Shotwell.
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Old 01-04-2014, 04:30 PM   #162
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Yup I fixed my link, sorry about that.
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Old 01-28-2014, 02:40 PM   #163
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When Galaxies Collide! you saw it here first!

Star-Crossed Galaxies
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Old 01-28-2014, 04:13 PM   #164
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When Galaxies Collide! you saw it here first!

Star-Crossed Galaxies

I have read of this before, but the video was great. Thanks for the link. It's amazing what science has discovered.
I like to learn new things, especially the unknown unknown's.

The strangest idea that I have now come to consider as somewhat possible is we may just be a simulation... The "Real" Final Frontier. ;-)




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Old 04-03-2014, 12:33 PM   #165
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Interesting note from NASA to Russia. What will this mean for companies like SpaceX, Sierra Nevada Corp, and NASA's own Orion spacecraft? The note itself is obviously politcial, IMHO, but I think it is interesting to see if the current problems with Russia will spur this country to speed up the manned space program. It's already taken us longer to get back into space than it did to launch the first Mercury astronauts back in the early 60's.

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Given Russia's ongoing violation of Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity, NASA is suspending the majority of its ongoing engagements with the Russian Federation. NASA and Roscosmos will, however, continue to work together to maintain safe and continuous operation of the International Space Station. NASA is laser focused on a plan to return human spaceflight launches to American soil, and end our reliance on Russia to get into space.
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Old 04-03-2014, 06:06 PM   #166
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It seems that an important Air Force tracking station caught fire a few days ago, so nothing is being launched from the Cape until it is fixed.
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Old 04-04-2014, 03:18 PM   #167
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It's already taken us longer to get back into space than it did to launch the first Mercury astronauts back in the early 60's.

Wow that is a telling factoid.
It in case people missed it 60 Minutes had a piece on Elon last week, very little new about either Tesla or SpaceX
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Old 04-04-2014, 03:45 PM   #168
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It's already taken us longer to get back into space than it did to launch the first Mercury astronauts back in the early 60's.
I was wrong. The first American satellite was launched in January of 1958. Shepard's flight was in May of 1961 about 3 1/2 years difference.

The last space shuttle flight was July of 2011. NASA anticipates launching a manned American craft in 2017. So assuming all goes well there will be about a six year gap. Granted the SpaceX or other manned craft will be a lot more sophisticated and capable than the first Mercury capsules, but consider that it took just over 8 years to go from Alan Shepard's sub-orbital flight to landing on the moon. We are really operating in slow motion these days. IMHO.
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Old 04-04-2014, 05:27 PM   #169
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The first American satellite was launched in January of 1958.
Vivid memories of those days.
When the first satellite was launched in 1957 (the Soviet "Sputnik"), it absolutely stunned the world.
My father drove the shuttle bus that just went round and round JFK Airport in New York (it was still called Idlewild in those days), so his bus route immediately became known as the Sputnik, as in "When you land at the TWA terminal, jump on the Sputnik and get over to the American terminal."
That name stuck for decades, but I doubt if it's still called that today.
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Old 04-04-2014, 08:22 PM   #170
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I remember going out at night and looking for Sputnik to come over. We did finally find it.
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Old 04-04-2014, 11:44 PM   #171
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I was wrong. The first American satellite was launched in January of 1958. Shepard's flight was in May of 1961 about 3 1/2 years difference.

The last space shuttle flight was July of 2011. NASA anticipates launching a manned American craft in 2017. So assuming all goes well there will be about a six year gap. Granted the SpaceX or other manned craft will be a lot more sophisticated and capable than the first Mercury capsules, but consider that it took just over 8 years to go from Alan Shepard's sub-orbital flight to landing on the moon. We are really operating in slow motion these days. IMHO.

I would bet the difference is desire and budget....

Back then it was part of the cold war and we spent big time to show we were better.... now we do not care and budgets are tight....
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Old 04-06-2014, 06:06 PM   #172
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....
The last space shuttle flight was July of 2011. NASA anticipates launching a manned American craft in 2017 IMHO.....
The lifting ability of the SLS will allow the rocket to deliver payloads to a position called L2 (a stable orbit beyond the moon), perform an asteroid mission, or even fly an unmanned sample return from the moons of Mars.

NASA's Biggest Rocket Yet Aims for 2017 Test Flight | Space Launch System (SLS) | Space.com

Stable orbit beyond the moon. I guess we are getting the high ground (again). Recent events have seemed to move this up to the front burner I think.
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Old 04-06-2014, 07:01 PM   #173
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The lifting ability of the SLS will allow the rocket to deliver payloads to a position called L2 (a stable orbit beyond the moon), perform an asteroid mission, or even fly an unmanned sample return from the moons of Mars.

NASA's Biggest Rocket Yet Aims for 2017 Test Flight | Space Launch System (SLS) | Space.com

Stable orbit beyond the moon. I guess we are getting the high ground (again). Recent events have seemed to move this up to the front burner I think.
I'll admit to have thoroughly drunk the Elon Musk, Koolaid. Still with the Falcon Heavy having nearly the capabilities of the SLS system and scheduled to be launched at the end of this year or early 2015. Why spend money on developing a more expensive rocket that won't be available until 2017?
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Old 04-18-2014, 03:01 PM   #174
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The latest launch of the Dragon space craft to the ISS went off without a hitch.

What's of more interest to me is the recovery effort of the first stage booster. They were going to attempt to restart the first stage rockets to slow it down, deploy the landing legs, and then watch it slowly descend into the Atlantic. Elon Musk estimates about a 40% chance of success on this first try, though they have successfully restarted the first stage engines at hypersonic speeds in a previous launch.
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Old 04-18-2014, 07:57 PM   #175
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Apparently they succeeded in 'soft' landing the first stage on the water. It transmitted data for 8 seconds after contact until it went horizontal. Salt water is hard on electronics. :-)
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Old 04-18-2014, 09:14 PM   #176
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Apparently they succeeded in 'soft' landing the first stage on the water. It transmitted data for 8 seconds after contact until it went horizontal. Salt water is hard on electronics. :-)
I find it really interesting that SpaceX is piggybacking experiments along side of commercial launches. In hindsight it seems obvious, but its not something that I've seen NASA or other Aerospace companies do very often.

Evidently the 1st stage account for roughly 60% of the cost of launch so being able to reuse them will make a big difference in terms of cost.
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Old 04-19-2014, 12:39 AM   #177
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I find it really interesting that SpaceX is piggybacking experiments along side of commercial launches. In hindsight it seems obvious, but its not something that I've seen NASA or other Aerospace companies do very often.
This flight has some crazy stuff. On the way up it deployed the KickSat, which will then deploy 104 Sprite satellites about 15 days from now. Yah. One Hundred Four.

The KickSat and Sprites are sending back telemetry til they re-enter. Ground stations (Hams with handheld antennas and radios linked to laptops) are competing to receive the telemetry.

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Old 04-19-2014, 06:55 AM   #178
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Among the other cool experiments the Dragon is carrying to the space station is a bunch of microbes to see how they grow and behave in outer space.

The really cool thing is where and who collected the microbes. Most of the were collected at various sports stadiums and the scientist who collected them were current and former NFL cheerleaders. Who have graduate degrees, and lot post doc work in science or engineering.



More on the biology here
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Old 04-19-2014, 11:07 AM   #179
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Here's an article on the ocean 'landing'. Apparently, there are still some bugs to be worked out.

SpaceX Claims Milestone With Bold Reusable Rocket Test | Space.com
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Old 04-24-2014, 10:21 AM   #180
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An interesting report on the latest SpaceX launch from MIT Technology Review

SpaceX Achieves First Booster Flyback During Space Station Mission | MIT Technology Review
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