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Old 08-06-2012, 09:01 PM   #21
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I agree keep enjoying it till someone tries to take it.
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Old 08-06-2012, 09:05 PM   #22
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10 years is a long time. I am increasingly worried about some of the latest virus mutations. I tend to be a pessimist by nature.
Are we talking seal flu? Ebola? Something else?
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Old 08-06-2012, 11:01 PM   #23
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I also lean more toward the pessimistic side. I worry about many of the same macroeconomic and political challenges so thoughtfully described by web_diva a few posts above. I am especially worried about the impact of the massive government and personal debt, whether it be slower economic growth, inflation, higher taxes, or worse.

That said, I appreciate the optimism expressed by most of the responses here. It makes me feel a little better that so many smart people feel pretty good about the future.
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Old 08-07-2012, 12:24 AM   #24
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I don't have a clue as to what will happen over the next ten years but I do know that we will make it thru whatever comes our way as a nation and we will come out stronger as a result.
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Old 08-07-2012, 12:25 AM   #25
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I try (not always successfully) to divide the potential nasties of the future into:

1. things I can do something about: manage my investments well, not hand over money to the wrong people, managing our expenses, helping our children grow and develop, looking after our health etc. It took a long time, but I eventually got to the point where I don't worry about these things anymore - I manage them and just deal with whatever happens. As far as the financial stuff is concerned, I've stuck around in the work force for an extra year or two so that the additional margin for error means I have a lot less to worry about.

2. things I can't do anything about ( or not much anyway) : wars, natural disasters, tax increases etc. If I can't do anything about them, I might as well press on and enjoy my life.

Speaking of attitude to future unknowns, time to update my signature line.
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Old 08-07-2012, 04:40 AM   #26
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For the next ten years I see a gradual turnaround, and we will end up with about 20 years of prosperity (2012-2032). Unfortunately the uptick will not encompass a great number of workers who have lost their jobs and need skills which are very different. This will place greater burden on social welfare systems. The system can't save its way out of two wars and a great recession, so taxes will need to rise. Megacorp continues to hold cash and not hire, so I feel there will be some dramatic tax law change that jump-starts small business. Businesses will get back to the idea that they must produce something that the market wants to buy.
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Old 08-07-2012, 06:50 AM   #27
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I have no idea what the next ten years will be like. But I too am a pessimist by nature. I got through the last financial crisis OK and hope to again if we have another one. So not going to worry about it. I always have my med's to fall back on I do plan to travel this fine country of ours over the next 10 years so I'm looking forward to that.
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Old 08-07-2012, 07:03 AM   #28
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Yes, among others. A flu pandemic is long overdue.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brewer12345

Are we talking seal flu? Ebola? Something else?
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Old 08-07-2012, 07:11 AM   #29
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I think the don't haves will take from the haves on an unprecedented scale.

Cheers
A similar concern was posted on another thread recently and I see this as a notable change coming over the next 10 years.

I"ve personally noticed a marked change in sentiment toward the 'haves'. We used to admire the rich guy; now we have an attitude that if someone is rich, it's because they screwed someone else.

Just yesterday I was at the train station and a homeless guy was walking around saying "c'mon, give me some money...all you people work and have jobs...you have too much already"

Not to be provacative, but personally, I have no long term hope for this country. We've gone from a meritocracy to an entitlement nation...not the end of the world, but in 40 years we'll be like Greece (but with worse food and lousy weather)

I just gotta get through the next 30 years.
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Old 08-07-2012, 07:14 AM   #30
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Not to be provacative, but personally, I have no long term hope for this country.
We're doomed, I tell you, DOOMED!

http://www.mayanapocalypse.com/
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Old 08-07-2012, 07:23 AM   #31
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We're doomed, I tell you, DOOMED!

The Official Mayan 2012 Countdown
Well, I was speaking mostly from a cultural viewpoint.

The US will continue with it's ups and downs financially, folks on this forum will continue to figure out how to dodge the tax man and we'll all be writing about our travel adventures.

I've learned that the worst projections never happen and that life goes on no matter what.

It's just that as a culture, we'll have a more divided nation. John Edwards was right about one thing: "there are two Americas" (the reality just wasn't what he was implying)
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:20 AM   #32
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Good question, Some folks above said 10 years is a long time, I believe it is a very short time. The priest at my dear mother’s funeral commented on what she said when she was dying at age 80. Words he said heard from so many people on their deathbed… “It all went by so fast”. I often think about that and how fast life really has been.

What do you see happening between now and 2022, or whatever your time line is for retirement?

I do not believe we will have a dramatic economic recovery. With today’s global economy I believe there will be a flattening of wealth throughout the world. We have seen a lot of this already with the changes in India and China. I just don’t believe we will bring the industries we have lost back to the country in just 10 years. I work in an international business and believe me, we have no plans on the horizon. Business has gone global.

I believe we will continue to view the world in a more global nature and those who can work beyond the boundaries of their culture and nation will be very successful.

I can predict with some certainty that I will still be driving the same pickup truck I have today as I really won’t need another for at least 20 years.

I expect my quality of life will improve somewhat as I will be retired and the pressure of work removed from my personal life. Although, I do believe it will remain somewhat the same for all in general.. No massive improvements, no massive reduction in quality. I have faith in people, and we will overcome the barriers that are set in front of us.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:33 AM   #33
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As for myself? I have no idea and don't fret about it. What will happen, will happen without my planning or influence on the "greater picture".

Heck, 10 years ago I/DW were still actively employed without any plan or desire to retire until our FRA age of 66.

I've been retired a bit over five years (at age 59), DW joined me at the end of March (at age 63).

So much for planning.

If the next 10 years turn out to be as good as my last five (in retirement), I'll be happy...
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:52 AM   #34
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Just remembering some past times

50 years ago we had the Cuban missile crisis, people were building bomb shelters in their back yards and everyone feared nuclear attack

40 years ago the war in Vietnam was at its peak, people were rioting in the streets

30 years ago Japan was becoming the country that would dominate the world

At all those times the view of the future was bleak and pessimistic. Since then global poverty has been reduced, human life expectancy has been extended, and the standard of living in the US has improved. Our greatest challenges do not require major discovery or scientific breakthrough, just some free will. I'm optimistic as ever.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:55 AM   #35
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I have the opposite concern. Never in recent history has the deck been stacked so far in the favor of the haves against the have nots, and yet all I ever seem to hear is rich people whinning about how tough they have it.

We have the lowest tax rates in fifty years. We can buy our children a huge advantage via better schools, good nutrition, better health care, and solid upbringing. If we get into legal trouble, we can buy ourselves a totally different brand of justice than the poor get.

Never in our history have our wealthy had such an oversized view of their relative worth compared to the rest of the country.

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A similar concern was posted on another thread recently and I see this as a notable change coming over the next 10 years.

I"ve personally noticed a marked change in sentiment toward the 'haves'. We used to admire the rich guy; now we have an attitude that if someone is rich, it's because they screwed someone else.

Just yesterday I was at the train station and a homeless guy was walking around saying "c'mon, give me some money...all you people work and have jobs...you have too much already"

Not to be provacative, but personally, I have no long term hope for this country. We've gone from a meritocracy to an entitlement nation...not the end of the world, but in 40 years we'll be like Greece (but with worse food and lousy weather)

I just gotta get through the next 30 years.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:56 AM   #36
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In the next ten years the concept of early retirement will continue to elude most people. I am five years younger than my DH who retired early this year from MegaCorp - the same place where I still work. I fear in the next ten years the corporation will gradually push up the retirement age in contract agreements. I just hope not in the next five years as at present I am set to leave at 52 after 30 years of service.
At present there are many retirees who draw a pension for a longer length of time than they actually worked as life spans have increased from previous generations. The writing is on the wall.
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:59 AM   #37
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Worrying only makes sense when we can do something about the problem. Beyond that, worry could almost be considered a pathology.
Literally true, but it's wise to monitor and adjust/plan for things even though we can't realistically do anything about them. I've known people who take 'it's out of my hands so I'm just going to enjoy myself' a little (or even much) too far, and then want to blame others when things go south. An overly fatalistic come-what-may approach could also be considered a pathology. But after doing what you can to protect yourself, I agree worrying is definitely pointless and self-destructive.
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Old 08-07-2012, 10:56 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by marko
A similar concern was posted on another thread recently and I see this as a notable change coming over the next 10 years.

I"ve personally noticed a marked change in sentiment toward the 'haves'. We used to admire the rich guy; now we have an attitude that if someone is rich, it's because they screwed someone else.

Just yesterday I was at the train station and a homeless guy was walking around saying "c'mon, give me some money...all you people work and have jobs...you have too much already"

Not to be provacative, but personally, I have no long term hope for this country. We've gone from a meritocracy to an entitlement nation...not the end of the world, but in 40 years we'll be like Greece (but with worse food and lousy weather)

I just gotta get through the next 30 years.
I certainly agree with you that the entitlement mentality is stronger than ever, but it appears to me the media is making more noise about taxing the rich than the public is. As long as the money is coming (borrowing of course) I don't think the general public cares if the rich are getting taxed more or not. This Gallup poll suggests it isn't a major priority issue.

http://dailycaller.com/2012/07/30/po...-voters-radar/
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Old 08-07-2012, 12:25 PM   #39
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I don't see how we can sustain an economy when technological advances are making American labor more and more irrelevant and less necessary over time.
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Old 08-07-2012, 12:36 PM   #40
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Literally true, but it's wise to monitor and adjust/plan for things even though we can't realistically do anything about them. I've known people who take 'it's out of my hands so I'm just going to enjoy myself' a little (or even much) too far, and then want to blame others when things go south. An overly fatalistic come-what-may approach could also be considered a pathology. But after doing what you can to protect yourself, I agree worrying is definitely pointless and self-destructive.
Thanks for the +1 on exactly what I thought I pointed out in the rest of my post. Worrying and fretting after one has already planned for and prepared for future disasters, is just flagellating oneself and IMO borderline pathological. The point of doing all that planning and preparation is so that afterwards, one can stop fretting and enjoy life.
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