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Old 11-09-2019, 09:17 AM   #541
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Knock on wood, zip the lips. Keep the good ju-ju. I look at the numbers and smile to myself. Happy to be here in this moment.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:04 AM   #542
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I just did a pretty exhaustive calculation of the returns across all of our accounts, taxable, 401k, IRA and Roths, including cash and things like I-bonds.

The YTD return for everything is 22.7%

Heavy lifter was 401K, which is 55% in VANG RUS 1000 (22.26% return) and 45% in VAN IS S&P500 IDX (25.53% return). This one account is 57% of our net invested assets.


Amazingly poor performers (relatively) for being indexes were a Roth with Vanguard VSIAX (16.5% return) and VTIAX (15.28%)

Best performer was not my Robinhood trading account (112% return) but actually one of my Roth accounts with an impressive 119% return. Go figure.

But I am not going to complain at a overall 22.7% return YTD!
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Old 11-09-2019, 12:11 PM   #543
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15% YTD.... AA has migrated from 60/35/5 at beginning of year to 53/42/5 today as a result of redeeming equities to buy credit union CD specials averaging 3.33% in the second and third quarters... very happy with 15%.
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Old 11-09-2019, 12:43 PM   #544
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Oh, I am currently 73% stocks, 26% cash, 1% i-bonds

No CDs or any other type of bond.

This is really aggressive for being retired, but we are only 49 and 50.

If I sold all of our other assets (land, cars, etc.), we would be something more like 60% to 65% stocks and 35% to 40% cash.
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Old 11-27-2019, 08:24 AM   #545
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I usually avoid posts to this thread other than end of month, but when I updated Quicken I noticed that I had crossed another six-figure hurdle.

YTD is 16%! Wow, what a year!

And note that Wow is a W-word but not the dreaded 4-letter W-word with an exclamation point.

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15% YTD.... AA has migrated from 60/35/5 at beginning of year to 53/42/5 today as a result of redeeming equities to buy credit union CD specials averaging 3.33% in the second and third quarters... very happy with 15%.
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Old 11-27-2019, 08:36 AM   #546
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Took a quick look Monday and retirement accounts are up 20% YTD!
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Old 11-27-2019, 08:36 AM   #547
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Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
I usually avoid posts to this thread other than end of month, but when I updated Quicken I noticed that I had crossed another six-figure hurdle.

YTD is 16%! Wow, what a year!

And note that Wow is a W-word but not the dreaded 4-letter W-word.

Congratulations!! I forget what day it actually happened, but I recently broke another six-figure hurdle as well. I'm hoping we can stay above that level today and Friday, so I can record it for posterity, as the final entry for this month in my spreadsheet.
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Old 11-27-2019, 08:44 AM   #548
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17.69 per MoneyChimp with a 50/50 AA The bond funds have helped carry the load this year. 2 intermediates vbtlx and vbilx along with vscsx as short term.
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Old 11-27-2019, 11:02 PM   #549
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Even my 40/60 401K is up 15.5% Wow... Overall, it's probably around 18% (Roughly 50/50). I only have 10% in international as for the equity, and more concentrated on domestic, and that might have worked in my favour this time around...

There were a few months a while back I didn't even want to check and I didn't, but I was looking forward to checking it tonight.
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Old 11-27-2019, 11:55 PM   #550
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Oh, I am currently 73% stocks, 26% cash, 1% i-bonds

No CDs or any other type of bond.

This is really aggressive for being retired, but we are only 49 and 50.

If I sold all of our other assets (land, cars, etc.), we would be something more like 60% to 65% stocks and 35% to 40% cash.
I am 70/28/2 also early 50's. Torn on changing allocation, but will consider it next year. I have FA friends who are split 100% stocks (because bonds approaching more negative risks when interests come back up) to 50% stocks for us.
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Old 11-28-2019, 06:21 AM   #551
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23.4% XIRR 93% equities (with several million in assets outside of the markets).

Not a bad return for a lazy couch potato indexer.
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Old 11-28-2019, 07:03 AM   #552
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17.69 per MoneyChimp with a 50/50 AA The bond funds have helped carry the load this year. 2 intermediates vbtlx and vbilx along with vscsx as short term.
Yeah, while I'm still happy with my decision to buy 3.5% and 3.0% CDs earlier this year, I didn't get the pop in value from the cuts in interest rates... but at the same time, I won't get the pain when rates rise.
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Old 11-28-2019, 07:10 AM   #553
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Yeah, while I'm still happy with my decision to buy 3.5% and 3.0% CDs earlier this year, I didn't get the pop in value from the cuts in interest rates... but at the same time, I won't get the pain when rates rise.
+1
Left bond funds last year, but also got some good CD deals, which will last 5 years. Then we will see.
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Old 11-28-2019, 08:52 AM   #554
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Yeah, while I'm still happy with my decision to buy 3.5% and 3.0% CDs earlier this year, I didn't get the pop in value from the cuts in interest rates... but at the same time, I won't get the pain when rates rise.
True be it, I think your way is a good call also. Last year the same funds took a bit of a hit. Cds just seem like too much work, but you could convince me otherwise.
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Old 11-28-2019, 08:55 AM   #555
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+1
Left bond funds last year, but also got some good CD deals, which will last 5 years. Then we will see.
I agree with your thinking, and I would not advise to jump into the bond funds now. I am buy and hold, so I ride the waves as they come. You will do as well or better over the long term.
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Old 11-28-2019, 09:10 AM   #556
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True be it, I think your way is a good call also. Last year the same funds took a bit of a hit. Cds just seem like too much work, but you could convince me otherwise.
Not sure about too much work, but there is some work/hassle involved, especially in my case since the CDs are all in tIRAs.

1. Join the credit union and make a small deposit to establish a share account (usually $5 and done all online or by phone).

2. Set up a tIRA account

3. Fund the tIRA account through a transfer from Vanguard (worst part and takes the longest IME).

4. Buy the CDs from the funds in the tIRA.

All told, 5-10 hours of effort depending on how smoothly step 3 goes. But for me, 3.5% to 3.0% for 5 years FDIC insured seems worth the effort.
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Old 11-28-2019, 09:43 AM   #557
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Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
Not sure about too much work, but there is some work/hassle involved, especially in my case since the CDs are all in tIRAs.

1. Join the credit union and make a small deposit to establish a share account (usually $5 and done all online or by phone).

2. Set up a tIRA account

3. Fund the tIRA account through a transfer from Vanguard (worst part and takes the longest IME).

4. Buy the CDs from the funds in the tIRA.

All told, 5-10 hours of effort depending on how smoothly step 3 goes. But for me, 3.5% to 3.0% for 5 years FDIC insured seems worth the effort.
No good to buy brokered CDs from Vanguard then?
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Old 11-28-2019, 10:15 AM   #558
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Using the Personal Capital tool. Tells me I'm up 35.95%.

Have a significant holding in AAPL that I can't sell since I'm using the ACA Healthcare subsidy this year, along with some ITOT.

2020 will be the last year for ACA and the subsidy qualify limitation since we will be able to get back on FEHB for medical. Then we can start doing Roth conversions to reduce the potential RMD's in 8 years.
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Old 11-28-2019, 10:37 AM   #559
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Using the Personal Capital tool. Tells me I'm up 35.95%.

Have a significant holding in AAPL that I can't sell since I'm using the ACA Healthcare subsidy this year, along with some ITOT. This is last year for ACA and the subsidy qualify limitation.
Fortunately (or unfortunately) DH’s significant AAPL holding is in his SEP-IRA so he has been able to start trimming aggressively without tax concerns.

On the other hand, such a run up over 20 years means much larger RMDs in another 5 years.

They get you one way or another!

Gosh - you just have to wait until Jan then!
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Old 11-28-2019, 11:20 AM   #560
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Fortunately (or unfortunately) DH’s significant AAPL holding is in his SEP-IRA so he has been able to start trimming aggressively without tax concerns.

On the other hand, such a run up over 20 years means much larger RMDs in another 5 years.

They get you one way or another!

Gosh - you just have to wait until Jan then!
Yes they do Audrey. I meant 2020 will be the last year for the subsidy as we will be able to get back on the Federal Health Care benefit. I just turned 62 so I have 8 years before the dreaded RMD's. Good on you for your husband having it in his tax sheltered account!

Still I'm grateful and in a much better position with AAPL and the taxes than I would have been without any shares starting in 2006.
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